Hospitality Management

Hospitality Management (HM)

HM 100 Calculations in Foodservice Occupations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:MATH 25 or 41, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of mathematical principles in the context of commercial food production. Topics include fractions, percentages, recipe conversions, yields, weights and measures, product yield tests, and recipe and food cost analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply problem-solving strategies to theoretical foodservice problems.
  • analyze production recipes in baking and foodservice.
  • structure mathematical solutions and formulas to foodservice production equations.
  • solve for recipe yields.
  • calculate recipe and menu costs.

HM 101 Introductory Culinary Skills

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the foundational skills required for all entry-level food preparation courses. Topics include the development of job skills, equipment utilization, weights, measurements, knife cut identification, speed and accuracy, as well as kitchen product identification and utilization.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and properly utilize all types of basic professional kitchen equipment, including knives.
  • identify and describe proper uses of each category of fresh herbs.
  • identify and demonstrate classic French knife cuts.
  • organize mis en place.
  • convert recipes using knowledge of weights and measures.
  • maintain kitchen safety and sanitation.

HM 110 Management and Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; or ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the effective management of human resources in the hospitality industry. It includes the study of the functions of both management and leadership, including planning, recruitment, selection, training, performance management, coaching, counseling, and discipline. It also emphasizes management and leadership theories and application.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate management/supervisor obligations to owners, customers, and employees.
  • research and appraise different management and leadership theories.
  • explain principles and potential barriers of good oral and written communication.
  • assess the costs/benefits of a multicultural work environment.
  • develop recruitment strategies for hospitality employees.
  • analyze training theories and procedures.
  • develop a training program for a selected industry segment.
  • evaluate and discuss methods of motivation.
  • analyze methods of discipline and common discipline problems of employees in the food service industry.
  • assess the characteristics of leadership.

HM 115 Advertising and Sales in Food Service

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces principles involved in advertising for food service establishments. Topics covered include menu planning, design, and pricing; marketing plans; market information systems; consumer behavior; and internal and external promotions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the role of marketing a food service operation
  • identify and describe the components of the marketing plan
  • apply the principles of consumer behavior to the development of a promotional scheme for a restaurant operation
  • plan and design a restaurant menu
  • design a comprehensive marketing plan for a restaurant

HM 120 Beverage Operation

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of beverages, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic, used in the food service industry. Topics include non-alcoholic beverages, spirits, beer, and wine, including their production methods and regions, quality and characteristics. Beverage service, wine analysis, service and pairing with food are also covered, as are government regulations, licenses and product costing. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and describe the types of beverages commonly sold in restaurant operations
  • describe production methods, regions, and ingredient sources of each major category of spirits
  • identify and describe styles of beer
  • describe the process for tea and coffee production
  • evaluate quality characteristics in different beverage categories
  • categorize the major world wine regions and the types of wines produced in each region
  • calculate beverage costs for mixed drinks, wine, and non-alcholic beverages

HM 150 Catering

  • Units:3
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 315 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the business and culinary aspects of catering and large-scale food production. It includes the study of starting a catering business, laws, licenses, taxes, insurance and contracts, menu development, pricing, and staffing. It also emphasizes quality and quantity production. On- and off-campus catering events are required. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 6-20 hours which may include setting tables, preparing food, and serving food for catered events.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate basic types of catering services and needs.
  • identify a potential target markets for a catering business.
  • design and develop a catering image and company profile, menus, and pricing strategy.
  • evaluate the kitchen and equipment requirements needed for various catered functions and business models.
  • compose order lists and production schedules for catered events.
  • analyze staff requirements for catered functions and prepare staffing schedules.
  • interpret labor laws, tax laws, licensing, and contract requirements as prescribed by local and state government.
  • design menus and cost recipes for suitability to multiple catered functions and markets.

HM 155 Mediterranean Cuisine

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 315 with a grade of "C" or better; AND HM 310 (Sanitation, Safety, and Equipment) with a grade of "C" or better OR a CA Foodhandler's Card.
  • Advisory:HM 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an in-depth look at the ingredients and culinary techniques used in preparing foods from the Mediterranean including France, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Spain, and North Africa, and regional focuses within these areas. The laboratory component includes skills development, production, and the use of equipment specific to the preparation of Mediterranean foods.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between specific Mediterranean areas and foods related to these areas.
  • appraise and properly handle ingredients used in Mediterranean cuisines.
  • identify and safely use equipment in a commercial kitchen.
  • analyze traditional and contemporary styles of food presentation, comparing Mediterranean techniques with modern American techniques.
  • prepare starch-based dishes native to Mediterranean areas.
  • create vegetable-based dishes native to Mediterranean areas.
  • prepare protein-based dishes native to Mediterranean areas.
  • define vocabulary used in Mediterranean ingredients and cooking techniques.

HM 165 Regional American Cuisine

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 315 with a grade of "C" or better; AND HM 310 (Sanitation, Safety and Equipment) with a grade of "C" or better OR a CA Foodhandler's Card.
  • Advisory:HM 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course presents the study of ingredients and culinary techniques used in the preparation of foods from a variety of North American cuisines, including New England, Floribbean, Cajun, Creole, Californian, Midwestern, Southern, and Pacific Northwestern. Topics include the foods indigenous to the regions and the influences of early settlers. The laboratory component includes skills development, production, and the use of equipment specific to those individual areas.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe basic United States geography and the foods indigenous to those areas.
  • choose and properly prepare ingredients indigenous to each U.S. region.
  • identify and safely use equipment in a commercial kitchen.
  • prepare starch-based dishes native to different U.S. regions.
  • create vegetable-based dishes native to different U.S. regions.
  • compose protein-based dishes native to different U.S. regions.
  • define vocabulary used in different regions for ingredients and cooking terms.

HM 180 Garde Manger

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 315 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the art of the cold kitchen with emphasis on both modern and classical techniques. Topics include hors d'oeuvre, canape, salads, brining, pickling, curing, and smoking. This course also includes basic charcuterie with emphasis on forcemeats, mousselines, terrines, pate, galantines, and sausages.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify kitchen tools and implements by name and describe their intended use
  • measure and scale ingredients correctly
  • prepare and evaluate sausages from various countries
  • evaluate charcuterie and its place for buffet presentation
  • create edible and non-edible display centerpieces
  • effectively plan, prepare, and set up cold foods for hors d'oeuvre and buffets
  • select and use forcemeats for preparation of pate, terrines, and galantines
  • evaluate and demonstrate the functions of each ingredient in charcuterie production
  • apply various methods of preservation for different meats and vegetables
  • fabricate both edible and non-edible displays for centerpieces

HM 290 Competitive Culinary Training

  • Units:2 - 4
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 315 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a cooperative effort between the college, The American Culinary Federation and The Capital Chefs' Association. This course offers the skills necessary to compete in regional and national culinary competitions, using the American Culinary Federation format. 54 hours per unit of TBA practices include knife skills and hot food preparation. Field trips to local restaurants are required to work with local chefs. This course may be taken up to 4 times for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate proficiency in all classic knife skills
  • demonstrate problem-solving abilities related to culinary crises
  • prepare a team-directed four-course, sit-down meal in 75 minutes, from start to finish
  • evaluate competitive standards for hot food dishes including seasonality and appropriate cooking methods
  • analyze dessert presentations to maximize usage of all necessary components
  • assemble mis en place under timed conditions
  • judge results of team effort as noted in evaluation handbook
  • plan and implement judge recommended improvements as required

HM 295 Independent Studies in Hospitality Management

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


HM 297 Internship in Hospitality Management

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:6 hours LEC; 36 - 198 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Must have completed 15 units in Hospitality Management with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a cooperative effort between the college and hospitality industries in the community to provide training through practical on-the-job experience. Internship sponsors/employers assist in the acquisition of skills and application of knowledge learned in the classroom. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 36 - 198 hours which may include setting tables, setting up food, and serving food.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply classroom experience and theory to employment in the hospitality industry.
  • compare and contrast various job assignments within the hospitality industry.
  • describe factors that lead to success in the workplace.

HM 300 Introduction to Hospitality - Becoming a Chef

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the history of the hospitality and culinary professions, explores the numerous avenues of opportunity, and studies the advantages of continuing education in the field. It also covers the backgrounds and approaches of successful chefs and restaurateurs. Field trips are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess key business, professional, and career opportunities in the hospitality field.
  • analyze important changes in industry products and trends.
  • identify periodicals, websites, and professional organizations to assist in career and vocational research.
  • describe the backgrounds, history, and philosophies of the most successful chefs, restaurateurs, and hospitality professionals.
  • plan a personal career ladder based on individual professional goals.

HM 310 Sanitation, Safety and Equipment

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers all phases of food sanitation, including the causes, controls and investigation of illness related to food contamination. It covers sanitary practices in food preparation; proper dishwashing procedures, sanitation of kitchen, dining room, and all equipment; cleaning materials and procedures and garbage and refuse disposal. This course includes general safety precautions, maintenance and operation of appropriate food service equipment, along with elements of kitchen planning and types of equipment used. Successful completion of this course results in Servsafe certification.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the importance of sanitation and safety in the food service industry.
  • interpret local, state, and federal laws relating to food safety.
  • describe the three categories of food contamination.
  • evaluate the conditions required for bacterial growth in food.
  • evaluate a hand washing station and explain the requirements of good hand washing.
  • choose and perform proper food storage techniques.
  • operate and clean food service equipment.
  • plan for the selection of physical spaces and equipment for a food service facility.

HM 315 Food Theory and Preparation

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a comprehensive study of basic principles of food science, theory, and techniques involved in food preparation. It includes a study of the factors that influence foods and the changes which occur in foods during preparation. It also emphasizes basic cooking skills, theory application, product, and quality identification.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply principles of food theory to choose and demonstrate optimal cooking procedures for all categories of foods to include, but not limited to: vegetables, fruits, fats and oils, milk products, eggs, cereal grains, legumes, starches, poultry, meat, seafood, and soups.
  • classify, describe, and safely utilize kitchen tools and equipment based on their intended function.
  • demonstrate basic cooking techniques including: poaching, seaming, frying, braising, grilling, roasting, and sautéing.
  • measure and scale ingredients correctly.
  • distinguish between different methods of heat transfer and choose cooking materials and techniques accordingly.
  • evaluate standard quality characteristics in raw and cooked foods.
  • analyze quality defects in cooked products and specify possible errors in technique or ingredient selection.
  • assess sources of food contamination and practice good sanitary techniques in the laboratory.

HM 320 Breads and Yeast Doughs

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 100 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers theory and principles of doughs, yeast, and pastries with emphasis in bread production, sweet and savory doughs, and egg doughs. It includes the study of croissant dough, puff dough, pate-a-choux, traditional breakfast pastries, and American cookies and teacakes. All content is intended for students interested in commercial restaurants, bakeries, and other food service facilities.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and identify ingredients and equipment of fine baking.
  • scale and measure ingredients properly.
  • assess leavening agents and gluten development.
  • assess the purposes and effects of fats.
  • demonstrate correct use of yeast and evaluate yeast doughs.
  • observe the effect of sugar on yeast doughs.
  • evaluate and identify uses for sweet and savory doughs.
  • analyze proofing, resting, sponge, and starters.
  • analyze the effects of eggs on doughs.
  • operate and use equipment safely and properly.
  • produce and evaluate bakery products.

HM 325 Components of Baking and Pastry

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the theory and principles of baking and pastry. It focuses on pies, galettes, tarts, pate a choux, cheesecakes, and custard based desserts. This course is intended for students interested in commercial application in restaurants, bakeries, and other food service facilities.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate quality characteristics of individual pastry components
  • measure and scale ingredients properly
  • assess characteristics and effects of fats and flours on baked goods
  • evaluate and prepare individual pastries
  • describe and demonstrate the method for pate a choux
  • produce and evaluate a variety of cheesecake styles
  • evaluate and demonstrate a variety of pies and galettes
  • evaluate and convert baking formulas for professional use

HM 326 Intermediate Baking Retail Bakery Products

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the theory and principles of baking and pastry with an emphasis on products commonly found in retail bakeries. It focuses on rich doughs, cookies, chocolate and puff pastry applications. This course is intended for students interested in commercial applications in bakeries, restaurants, and other food service facilities.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the quality characteristics of rich doughs including Danish and croissants
  • describe and evaluate the different categories of cookies and bars
  • demonstrate basic chocolate work and piping skills
  • produce and evaluate puff pastry dough
  • assess characteristics and effects of fats and flours on rich doughs and cookies
  • evaluate and describe the characteristics of chocolate and the effects of sugar and fats to the final product

HM 328 Intermediate Baking American and European Cakes

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the theory and principles of both American and European cake tradition. It focuses on baking methods, ingredient selection, filling, and finishing components and techniques. This course is intended for students interested in commercial bakery application.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe and demonstrate the mixing methods for various categories of cakes.
  • identify the components and describe the quality characteristics of American cakes.
  • identify the components and describe the quality characteristics of traditional European cakes.
  • evaluate and produce cake fillings appropriate to a cake style.
  • evaluate and produce cake frostings appropriate to a cake style.
  • demonstrate professional level piping skills.

HM 330 Advanced Baking and Pastry

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 310, 320, and 325 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on commercial production of baked products, pastries, candies, restaurant style desserts, and wedding cakes. It emphasizes advanced baking science and commercial production. Products include European style breads, restaurant style plate presentation, frozen desserts, tortes, cakes, sauces, tarts, pulled sugar, piping, and chocolate work. This course also emphasizes the production of high quality products and professional presentation. Field trips to professional bakeries are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critique and select professional and commercial bakeshop ingredients and supplies.
  • scale and measure baking ingredients accurately.
  • examine the factors that control the development of gluten in baked products.
  • explain the changes that take place in dough or batter as it bakes.
  • assess and demonstrate basic mixing methods for yeast doughs, cakes, cookies, and pastries.
  • describe the use and control of leavening agents.
  • prepare and critique a variety of products to include biscuits, artisan breads, Danish pastry, muffins, coffee cakes, pies, tarts, puff pastry, cakes, cookies, pastry cream, paté a choux, icings, soufflés, ice creams, and meringues.
  • evaluate the quality of finished products.
  • operate bakeshop equipment to include scale, ovens, mixers, processors, proof box, and others.
  • decorate pastry items using the paper cone, pastry bag, and chocolate decorations.
  • analyze quality defects in baked products and specify possible errors in technique or ingredient selection.
  • temper chocolate and explain the procedures of tempering and melting.
  • create and design wedding and specialty cakes.

HM 340 Cost Control in the Food Service Industry

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:HM 100 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers accounting and cost control principles in the food service industry. It includes the use of accounting techniques to analyze food and labor cost control, business operations, budgeting, financing, and profit and loss statements.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain accounting principles and concepts as they relate to the food service industry
  • calculate food and labor cost percentages
  • evaluate a profit-and-loss statement to identify where cost savings might occur
  • evaluate the relationship between food costs, labor costs, and overhead costs
  • evaluate and calculate menu prices
  • analyze a balance sheet, net income, gross income, and a profit and loss statement
  • prepare and assess a break-even analysis
  • compare and analyze methods of internal cost control

HM 360 Professional Cooking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:HM 315 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:HM 100 and 310
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers intermediate and advanced culinary techniques. It includes production standards, recipe analysis, presentation, stocks, sauces, and major ingredients used in professional cooking. The laboratory component includes use of equipment, skills development, and time management in the commercial kitchen.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define vocabulary used in professional cooking.
  • evaluate quality characteristics of protein, vegetable, and starch dishes.
  • create production recipes for commercial cooking to determine scheduling (mise en place), quantities, and characteristics of final product.
  • apply principles of safety and sanitation to kitchen and lab production.
  • evaluate and produce stocks and the full range of sauces used in the professional kitchen.
  • set up and use equipment safely, effectively, and efficiently.
  • evaluate and select techniques in the preparation of meat, poultry, seafood, vegetables, and starches at a professional level.
  • prioritize and demonstrate proper culinary techniques including knife skills, cooking methods, balancing flavor and selection of proper ingredients in the creating of complete plate.
  • identify and demonstrate modern styles of presentation and garnishing.

HM 370 Dining Room Management

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:HM 100 and 310 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:HM 498, to include a minimum of eight hours per week of work experience in the operation of the front of the house for The Oak Café at American River College
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on restaurant management with emphasis on service and the dining room. Topics include the historical view of service, quality, and exceeding guest expectations, methods of service, management of service operations and personnel, internal and external marketing, and daily reports and controls. The work experience component allows for hands-on experience running the dining room of the Oak Café two days a week.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare styles and techniques of service throughout history
  • assess characteristics of professional service and service personnel
  • define quality concepts, including exceeding expectations, constant improvement, and team building
  • evaluate service in the various segments of the hospitality industry and restaurants in particular
  • incorporate standards and procedures for delivery concepts into appropriate restaurant service
  • analyze the manager's role in the delivery of professional service
  • plan effective internal and external marketing relating to particular concepts and menus
  • analyze daily operations data

HM 375 Bakery Management and Production

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:HM 310, 315, 320, and 325 with grades of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:HM 498
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on bakery production, merchandising, and management for a professional bakery/cafe outlet. It includes production techniques, recipe development, customer service, advertising and promotion, menu planning, costing, production, and staff scheduling. Work experience takes place in the Oak Cafe Bakery two days a week.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the basic principles of baking to production recipes.
  • design merchandising displays that encourage sales.
  • critique and prepare accurate and efficient production schedules.
  • evaluate quality characteristics of baked items, including quick breads, roll-in doughs, yeast breads, and patisserie items.
  • structure and execute menus that are seasonal and meet the needs of the client.
  • generate purchase orders for food and supplies using inventories, menu analysis, and cost-effective principles.
  • use formulas to construct and calculate profit-and-loss statements for bakery production.

HM 380 Restaurant Management and Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:HM 100, 310, 315, 320, 325, and 360 with grades of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in HM 498 (to include a minimum of 16 hours per week of work experience in the commercial kitchen of The Oak Café American River).
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an in-depth look at restaurant management with emphasis on the kitchen. It includes the study of successful restaurant concepts, food styles and ethnic influences, production methods and standards, menu design (including specific purchasing and cost control), application of sanitation and safety standards, employee scheduling, motivation and supervision, and product marketing. These concepts are emphasized in the work experience corequisite. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the principles and techniques of cooking previously acquired to large-scale production.
  • design and apply standards of safety and sanitation to daily food production.
  • critique and prepare accurate and efficient production schedules.
  • generate purchase orders for food and supplies using inventories, menu analyses, and cost effective principles.
  • compare styles of successful chefs and restaurant concepts.
  • construct and execute menus considering food, labor, production costs, and marketing.
  • assess quality principles to the management of the restaurant kitchen, for both food and employees, including team building and evaluation.

HM 494 Topics in Hospitality Management

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:18 - 54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better; OR placement through assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to study topics in Hospitality which are job oriented and not included in current offerings. The course may be repeated for up to 6 units of credit provided there is no duplication of topics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply concepts acquired for the special topics
  • demonstrate knowledge received in the class setting or on the job
  • apply critical thinking skills to explain project outcomes as related to specific topic.

HM 495 Independent Studies in Hospitality Management

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


HM 498 Work Experience in Hospitality Management

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position, or job related to hospitality management with a cooperating site supervisor. Students are advised to consult with the Hospitality Management Department faculty to review specific certificate and degree work experience requirements.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of hospitality management. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer-level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce, completion of Title 5 required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site, and developing workplace skills and competencies.

During the semester, the student is required to complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. All students are required to attend the first class meeting, a mid-semester meeting, and a final meeting. Additionally, students who have not already successfully completed a Work Experience course will be required to attend weekly orientations while returning participants may meet individually with the instructor as needed. Students may take up to 16 units total across all Work Experience course offerings. This course may be taken up to four times when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate application of industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in the field of hospitality management related to a transfer degree level career as written in the minimum three (3) learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course
  • make effective decisions, use workforce information, and manage his/her personal career plans.
  • behave professionally, ethically, and legally at work, consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and organizational norms.
  • behave responsibly at work, exhibiting initiative and self-management in situations where it is needed.
  • apply effective leadership styles at work, with consideration to group dynamics, team and individual decision making, and workforce diversity.
  • communicate in oral, written, and other formats, as needed, in a variety of contexts at work.
  • locate, organize, evaluate, and reference information at work.
  • demonstrate originality and inventiveness at work by combining ideas or information in new ways, making connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, and reshaping goals in ways that reveal new possibilities using critical and creative thinking skills such as logical reasoning, analytical thinking, and problem-solving.