Theatre Arts

Theatre Arts (TA)

TA 294 Topics in Theatre Arts

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:27 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.

This course covers topics in theatre which are not included in current course offerings. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 27-216 hours which may include theatrical studies, preparation or performance.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the role of this specific theatre topic in society.
  • analyze the steps needed toward accomplishing the goal of the topic.
  • describe the methods used in this specific theatrical area.
  • develop and evaluate the techniques used in this topic.

TA 300 Introduction to the Theatre

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 111

This course provides a general introduction to live theatre as an artistic and social force. It surveys the literary, cultural, and historical aspects of theatre arts. This is an audience-oriented, non-performance course open to all students. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and evaluate the nature of theatre and its role in society.
  • assess the historical, artistic, social, and philosophical environments in which theatre exists.
  • critically analyze dramatic performances.
  • identify and examine theatrical components in production.
  • propose alternative solutions to theatrical production situations.
  • appreciate viewing theatre as an art form.

TA 302 History and Theory of the Theatre I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 101; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 113

This course is a survey of the history of world theatre from its origins through the 17th Century. The history and evolution of drama and theatre practice are studied in relationship to cultural, political, and social conditions of the time. Plays are read that exemplify major developments and significant artists. Field trips to attend live performances may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the historical development of theatre from its origins to the 17th Century.
  • assess the relationship of theatre arts to other parts of society throughout history.
  • analyze the artistic, social, and philosophical environments in which theatre evolved.
  • evaluate significant work of playwrights from distinct periods of theatre history.

TA 303 History and Theory of the Theatre II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 101; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3A

This course is a survey of the history of world theatre from the 17th Century to the modern era. The history and evolution of drama and theatre practice are studied in relationship to cultural, political, and social conditions of the time. Plays are read that exemplify major developments and significant artists. Field trips to attend live performances may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the historical development of theatre from the 17th Century to the modern era.
  • assess the relationship of theatre arts to other parts of society throughout history, including the present day.
  • evaluate the artistic, social, and philosophical environments in which theatre evolved.
  • evaluate significant work of playwrights from distinct periods of theatre history, including current writers.

TA 306 Diversity in American Drama (1960 to Present)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This course surveys the theatrical expression of Native-American, African-American, Latino, and Asian-American theatre from 1960 to the present. It includes the social, political, cultural, and economic climate reflected in the text and production of the play. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the ways that ritual, music, dance, and storytelling influence and shape the theatrical expressions of various cultures.
  • analyze stereotypes and racism as expressed in the theatre of various cultures in society.
  • describe the ramifications and contributions of the unique theatrical expression of America's diverse populations.
  • identify the negative theatrical images of various cultures and their influence on society.
  • describe the major historical, cultural, political, and economic forces at work within the various groups and in society at large.
  • compare and contrast the theatrical expressions of various groups with mainstream theatrical expression in the same period.

TA 344 Improvisation and Theatre Games

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course explores theatre games and improvisational exercises designed to develop trust, cooperation, mental acuity, and physical and vocal range as an actor. Improvisation technique is built from the ground up, providing a strong foundation for advanced work in non-scripted performance as well as modern rehearsal techniques that involve extensive use of improvisation. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply techniques used in games and exercises to develop physical and vocal range as an actor.
  • analyze character, setting, and objective without the use of a script.
  • compare and contrast improvisational acting techniques with other acting methods.
  • demonstrate an honest imaginative improvisational performance.
  • evaluate the improvisational work of others in a constructive manner using the Viola Spolin technique.
  • create a collaborative group performance using improvisational techniques.

TA 350 Theory and Techniques of Acting I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 and ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: TA 350 and 480 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 151

This course explores the major theories and techniques of acting, including improvisation, physical expressiveness, voice production, character portrayal, and scene work. Field trips may be required. This course is not open to students who have completed TA 480.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize standard practices of ensemble playing in a rehearsal/performance environment.
  • demonstrate basic skills of acting, including physical, vocal, imaginative, analytical, and emotional elements.
  • compose a character analysis based on the text and subtext of a given script.
  • identify the elements of the performance space.
  • assess emotional, behavioral, sensory, and cognitive resources for character development.
  • utilize body and voice as the primary instrument of dramatic expression.
  • analyze dramatic textual components as they pertain to performance.
  • critique a scene from an observer's point of view, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of that presentation.
  • compare and analyze the theories and techniques of acting.

TA 351 Theory and Techniques of Acting II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:TA 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 152

This course covers the application of advanced acting theories and techniques. It includes analyzing and performing scripts from realistic and stylized drama, audition monologues, and complex acting exercises. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate complex techniques dealing with the craft of acting.
  • identify and explain principles of voice production and body movement.
  • evaluate scene work developed from published plays.
  • describe fundamental concepts that comprise effective acting techniques.
  • illustrate an awareness of the importance of discipline, exactness, persistence, diligence, imagination, and teamwork in the craft of acting.
  • analyze the personality and motivations of a given character.
  • synthesize appropriate attributes and techniques to create a character which is believable and appropriate to the style and genre of the play from which a scene is taken.
  • employ imagination to simulate the dramatic experiences of a given character.
  • apply elements of effective acting techniques as a personal standard.

TA 356 Acting for the Camera I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:TA 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course introduces the theory and technique of acting for film and video, focusing on the differences between stage acting and acting for the camera. It provides opportunities to apply acting theory and technique in a video studio setting. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the basic fundamentals of the craft of acting for the camera.
  • differentiate the technical and stylistic differences between stage acting and acting for the camera.
  • apply acting skills and talents in a video studio setting.
  • analyze a scene from an observer's point of view using a fundamental technique point of view to identify strengths and weaknesses.
  • demonstrate performance technique for talk show interviews, work in professional commercials, and work in professional industrial films and theatrical films.
  • describe the steps involved in entering the business of acting for films and video.

TA 357 Acting for the Camera - II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:TA 356 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 OR ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; or ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course develops advanced skills of acting for film and television. It provides opportunities in a studio setting to practice monologues, commercials using a teleprompter, and scene work. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the principles of dramatic structure.
  • assess the objectives of a character in a scene.
  • evaluate fundamental concepts of good acting techniques.
  • diagnose the strengths and weaknesses of scene work.
  • evaluate the various methods of creating character through choices in voice, movement, and style.
  • synthesize a methodology for developing a role incorporating skills and character study.
  • analyze advanced skills in the craft of acting for the camera in a video studio setting.
  • demonstrate performance techniques for work in auditions, industrial films and commercials, television, and film scenes.
  • design a film career portfolio.
  • demonstrate performance techniques for work in auditions, individual films and commercial, television, and film scenes.

TA 362 Styles of Acting: Classical

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:TA 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: 362 and 366 combined: maximum credit, 6 units)

This course explores the styles of acting used in Classic Theatre from the Greeks through Restoration. It examines the actor's approach to the text as well as the voice and movement needs of classic styles. Styles include Greek, Commedia dell'Arte, Shakespeare, and Restoration. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the concept of style as it relates to art and to the theatre.
  • analyze and compare personal style to classical styles utilized in dramatic literature.
  • integrate dramatic works within their historical/societal context and develop characterizations appropriate to the dramatic genre.
  • demonstrate versatility of movement and voice that conforms to the classical style of different periods of theatre.
  • apply physical and vocal techniques to public performance of three classic styles of acting.

TA 366 Styles of Acting: Modern

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:TA 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:TA 300 and 351
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: 362 and 366 combined: maximum credit, 6 units)

This course explores the styles of acting required for modern theatre from 1875 to the present. It examines the actor's approach to modern texts as well as the voice and movement needs of modern styles. Topics include Realism, Epic Theatre, Theatre of the Absurd, and contemporary solo performance. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the concept of artistic style as it relates to art and society.
  • analyze personal style and compare and contrast this with the styles of other historical periods.
  • integrate dramatic works within their historical/societal context and develop characterizations appropriate to the dramatic genres.
  • demonstrate a versatility of movement and voice that conforms to the modern style of different genres of theatre.
  • synthesize study of modern acting styles with techniques learned in general acting classes and theatre productions.
  • critique acting performances for their style appropriateness.

TA 370 Theatre Movement

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course is an active participation and performance experience designed to provide opportunities in discovery and to solve movement tasks of the actor. It incorporates exercises to expand the individual's movement for characters and scenes, as well as training in specific movement areas, such as combat, mime, period style, and dance. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate practical techniques of stage combat, dance, mime, and period style
  • compare body movements as they relate to acting problems
  • analyze the manners, dress, and dance forms of historical periods relevant to the stage
  • demonstrate increased physical flexibility, strength, and balance with stage movement
  • generate collaborative ensemble movement
  • develop characters through theatrical movement techniques
  • critique movement techniques of a dramatic performance

TA 375 Voice, Diction and Dialects

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course focuses on the overall improvement of vocal quality, explores monologue and dialogue performances, and develops confidence in speaking and voice production. It emphasizes self-improvement drills involving breath control, resonance, pitch, inflection, and articulation, and introduces a study of the vocal anatomy, its parts, and their functions. Additionally, this course covers the study and application of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), and includes a special study and application of stage dialects and/or accent reduction.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the elements of proper vocal production.
  • locate and describe basic parts of the anatomy that affect and support vocal production.
  • integrate knowledge of proper vocal technique into performances of narration, poetry, and/or dramatic monologues.
  • assess personal strengths and weaknesses in the areas of correct breathing, phonation, resonation, and articulation.
  • identify the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) sounds and their respective symbols and be able to apply them to speech.
  • identify, define, and describe basic areas of IPA sound placement in the mouth.
  • compare and contrast the differences in vowel and consonant formation between standard American speech and select dialects.
  • integrate the fundamental sounds of select dialects into performances of narration, poetry, and/or dramatic monologue.
  • practice and perform narration, poetry, and/or dramatic monologues demonstrating the sounds unique to select dialects and/or standard American speech.
  • assess and enumerate the vocal challenges, successes, and issues of other speakers and identify remedies for noted issues.

TA 377 Musical Theatre Techniques

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This is a performance-oriented course integrating acting and singing skills through the creation of a unified character. It is both an introduction for students with little or no previous musical theatre experience and a continuing performance forum for those with previous training. Primary emphasis is placed on the three core areas of musical theatre performance: acting, singing, and movement. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • synthesize choreographed movement and blocking skills with optimum singing skills.
  • define the various categories of musical theatre songs and dance styles.
  • identify the various types of lyrics of musical theatre songs.
  • analyze the components of musical theatre songs and dance styles.
  • interpret a character through a musical theatre song/script.
  • critique acting, singing, and movement skills in a musical theatre performance.
  • develop and perform an audition package consisting of a ballad and an up-tempo solo.
  • identify historical eras in the development of American musical theatre.

TA 390 Directing and Play Production

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:TA 350 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:TA 300, 351, and 420; and eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area C1

This course is an introduction to directing and the elements of play production. It includes the process of preparing and analyzing a script for production, auditioning and casting a play, blocking and rehearsing actors, and dealing with technical and promotion needs of a production. It also requires directing scenes and/or short plays and preparing a prompt book. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and interpret a script to translate the written word into stage language that is behavioral, visual, and aural.
  • analyze the genre and style of a specific play to develop appropriate staging.
  • identify the organizational and administrative responsibilities of a stage director from script selection through final performance.
  • define and appraise fundamental guidelines of composition in combining the actor with the stage and scenic elements.
  • analyze the structure and progression of a scene in a given play in terms of "motivational units."
  • demonstrate communication skills dealing with actors and technicians relative to both rehearsal problems and concepts.
  • identify and evaluate basic organizational procedures of casting and script interpretation.
  • analyze plays for their production and performance possibilities.
  • prepare a prompt book for production of the selected play.
  • select, cast, and rehearse a play to be presented at a public performance.
  • evaluate the technical support that is provided for a play production.

TA 395 Playwriting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the craft of dramatic writing. Elements of plot construction and character development are emphasized through writing exercises, superior models of drama, and drafting and revision of an original play script. Attending an out-of-class live drama performance is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the classical elements of play construction
  • identify the practical relationship between the written elements of a play script and their application in the live theatre
  • create an original dramatic work through an applied process of story and character development
  • revise a play script based on self-assessment and the input of others
  • analyze existing plays for their structural and dramatic effectiveness
  • evaluate the work of others in a collaborative environment

TA 400 Creative Drama for Children

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course explores theatrical forms and activities to help drama leaders guide children in developing their academic, social, and performance skills. It includes strategies for infusing drama, pantomime, improvisation, puppetry, and creative role-playing into school curriculum and recreational programs. It is designed for anyone who interacts with pre-school and elementary-age children. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • list the benefits of using drama as a teaching tool for young children.
  • analyze and explore the nature of working in groups and setting classroom limits.
  • develop simple drama activities and games.
  • distinguish and contrast the various creative drama techniques including imaginative play, creative movement, pantomime, story dramatization, improvisation, theatre games, puppetry, and storytelling.
  • research, compile, and organize a collection of creative drama games and activities based on children's ages, stages of development, and curriculum needs.
  • plan drama activities which are integrated with classroom curriculum.
  • select and lead creative drama activities and then evaluate and analyze their effectiveness.

TA 404 Techniques of Puppetry

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 101; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course explores puppetry as a dramatic medium. It covers the history and development of puppetry, puppet design and creation, puppet manipulation and improvisation, and puppet play production techniques and applications.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create original material for puppetry using standard dramatic structure
  • dramatize a story with appropriate puppet movement and dialog (using improvisation and/or rehearsal)
  • incorporate voice and puppet movement to develop character and motivation
  • design puppets representing the basic puppet classifications
  • construct puppets using basic craft skills (clay and foam modeling, casting, sewing, woodworking, painting)
  • plan and execute productions using constructed puppets

TA 406 Children's Theatre

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Audition/Interview
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1

This course explores children's literature in performance through dramatic presentations of fiction, drama, and poetry for an audience of children or young people. It provides the opportunity to analyze and experience the production process from script to stage. It includes the development of a touring children's production. No prior theatrical experience is required. This course is recommended for theatre, education, early childhood education, and recreation majors. Public performances and regular field trips are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze children's literature for theme, structure, characterization, and performance elements.
  • devise and present a theatrical script from children's literature.
  • create a character analysis.
  • demonstrate acting skills in intensive play production rehearsal and performance environments.
  • evaluate an actor's responsibilities to the ensemble.
  • demonstrate commitment to the demands of a touring production through participation in the production process.

TA 420 Stagecraft

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:MATH 25 OR MATH 41 with a grade of "C" or better or placement through the placement process; AND TA 300; AND eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 102; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320; AND
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 171

This course is an introduction to technical theatre and the creation of scenic elements for theatre, film or television. It covers design styles, painting, set construction, set movement techniques, properties construction, backstage and rehearsal organization and management, and career possibilities. The course combines lectures, reading and projects with practical experience gained from working on department productions. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 18 hours which may include scenery construction, props, and painting.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate scenic production skills
  • incorporate scenic tools, materials, and processes in the creation of scenery and props
  • analyze scenic production problems, evaluate alternatives and recommend solutions
  • evaluate the role of the theatre technician
  • examine the production process in technical theatre

TA 422 Stage Lighting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGRD 15 and ENGWR 51, OR ESLR 310 and ESLW 310, OR placement through assessment process; AND MATH 25 or MATH 41, TA 300, and TA 420.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 173

This course introduces the basic concepts of lighting for stage, film or television. Topics include the basic elements of lamps and fixtures, electricity, dimmers and control consoles. It also covers the design elements of color, distribution, and space to produce a lighting design. Practical lighting skills are gained from work on department productions. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 18 hours which may include hanging, circuiting, and focusing lights.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate practical stage lighting and rigging techniques
  • analyze and apply the basic components of stage lighting such as optics, electricity, and instrumentation
  • analyze artistic lighting components such as color, angle, and style
  • evaluate a script and setting, and design an appropriate light plot
  • analyze a script, and design and produce a basic sound plot

TA 424 Advanced Technical Theatre

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:TA 420 and 422 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This is an advanced study course dealing with technical theatre design and production techniques in the areas of scenery, props, lighting, sound, scenic painting, rigging or stage management through individual projects and participation in major productions. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 18-72 hours which may include practical work in lighting, scenic construction or design, sound design, rigging, or stage managing techniques.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and evaluate theatrical designs and projects
  • demonstrate advanced technical theatre skills
  • integrate specialized technical processes in the solution of production problems
  • evaluate production requirements and create appropriate designs and/or projects for the production

TA 430 Costume Construction

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 102; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 174

This course explores the basic areas of costume construction and offers experience in constructing costumes for theatrical productions. Topics include fabrics, color, patterns, sewing techniques, costume pieces, and accessories. Period styles, costume analysis, and basic elements of costume design are also covered. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role of theatre and costuming in society at large.
  • describe the role of the costume designer and the costume shop staff in a theatre production.
  • analyze the historical, artistic, and social environments of various periods and their resultant styles.
  • demonstrate basic design skills and basic patterning, construction, and alteration techniques using various sewing machines and hand sewing tools.
  • explain the composition, properties, and construction of fabric and demonstrate textile manipulation techniques.
  • organize an artistic and practical solution to the costume requirements of a dramatic work.
  • evaluate the costumes in a live theatrical presentation.

TA 433 Costume Production

  • Units:0.5 - 3
  • Hours:27 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FASHN 374 or TA 430 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 102; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU

This lab course explores the process of developing costumes for theatrical productions through the set-up, creation, and assembly of costumes for mainstage productions. Projects focus on developing sewing, craft, and patterning skills, clothing alteration methods and working with fabrics, hats and accessories, dyes and textile paints as utilized in each production. Field trips may be required. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of hours which may include pattern making, sewing, alteration, and maintenance of costumes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply patterning, construction, and alteration skills while demonstrating proficiency in the operation of various sewing machines and tools.
  • examine period styles as they relate to a specific costume situation.
  • formulate an artistic and practical solution to the costume requirements of a dramatic work.
  • evaluate and enact a viable approach to constructing theatrical costumes.
  • demonstrate basic skills that alter existing fabric such as dying, distressing, and painting.
  • organize and maintain a costume shop and its storage units.

TA 434 Vintage Costuming

  • Same As:FASHN 334
  • Units:0.5 - 2
  • Hours:4.5 - 18 hours LEC; 13.5 - 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:FASHN 357 or TA 430; and eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300, OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course covers the principles and techniques involved in developing and constructing period costumes and/or accessories through individual fabrication of costume pieces. The historical period or topic changes each semester. This course is open to all skill levels, with basic knowledge of sewing recommended. It is not open to students who have completed FASHN 334. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • research and identify historical costume pieces as covered in the specific semester's topic.
  • compare and contrast the costume pieces of different historical periods.
  • analyze the design and construction techniques necessary to create a period costume as specified in the specific semester's topic.
  • construct period costume pieces as covered in the specific semester's topic.

TA 435 History and Theory of Costuming

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This is a survey course of historical periods as portrayed through fashion and costumes from ancient through modern times. The impact of social, political, cultural, and economic issues on costuming is explored and analyzed, as is the effect of costumes on society. This course integrates design elements with historical styles to develop designs for theatrical costumes. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the roles of fashion and theatre and their relationship to society.
  • analyze the major historical eras and their impact on fashion style.
  • recognize the clothing components of different historical styles.
  • demonstrate basic design skills.
  • integrate historical knowledge with design elements to develop designs for historical theatrical costumes.

TA 437 Stage Make-up I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID THTR 175

This course covers the basic techniques of theatrical makeup. It explores makeup materials, color and light, modeling techniques, and design elements in the development of makeup designs for corrective, old age, historical, stylized faces, clowns, animals, and fantasy makeup.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the basic techniques of theatrical makeup.
  • research and design makeup for straight, corrective, age, character, and fantasy situations.
  • analyze design elements and application techniques to achieve makeup designs for a variety of characters.
  • compile and organize a pictorial research notebook of photographs of people's faces.
  • analyze the interaction of heredity, environment, temperament, health, and age as they are manifested in facial characteristics.
  • assess the creative use of makeup design to interpret a production and create visual characterization.
  • demonstrate proper knowledge of skin preparation, products, and safety procedures in application and removal of makeup.

TA 440 Arts Management

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU

This general survey course in arts management emphasizes organization, marketing, audience development, and financial management. It includes promotion and publicity, house management, box office operations, and public relations. It also includes field work projects with an existing arts organization.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role of arts management in the entertainment industry.
  • analyze the organizational structure of an arts organization.
  • evaluate marketing and audience development strategies.
  • evaluate business, box office, and public relations methods.
  • examine operations and apply practical experience to the solving of management problems.

TA 452 One-Act Play Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Audition/Interview
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course explores the play production process. It provides experience as an active participant in the analysis, preparation, and production of one-act plays through participation as either directors, writers, actors, or technicians. This course culminates in public performances.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the professional responsibilities of an actor and/or technician associated with the preparation and performance of a theatrical production
  • analyze the evolution of a character in production from script to performance
  • analyze and solve technical challenges associated with the creation and presentation of a theatrical production
  • utilize skills and talents in an intensive rehearsal and performance environment of a play production
  • assess the role of the actor, director, producer, playwright, designer, crew, and audience in the production of a play

TA 466 Rehearsal and Performance - Musical Ensemble

This course provides a workshop training experience in the preparation and performance of musical theatre ensemble productions. A different production is presented each semester the course is offered. Students interested in singing/acting roles audition with the director. Students interested in instrumental positions audition with the musical director. Students interested in technical work interview with the technical director. Field trips may be required. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 27-162 hours which may include acting, singing, dancing, musical, or technical rehearsals and preparation. It is not open to students who have completed MUP 370.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • practice and perform a musical production.
  • evaluate the professional responsibilities of an actor, singer, musician, or technician in a production as appropriate.
  • analyze the evolution of a participant's role in a production from rehearsal to performance.
  • integrate acting, singing, and/or dancing skills in an intensive rehearsal/performance environment (if participating as an actor/singer).
  • integrate musical skills in an intensive rehearsal/performance environment (if participating as a musician).
  • incorporate basic technical skills in the creation or manipulation of sets, props, costumes, lighting, or sound as appropriate (if participating as a technician).
  • analyze and solve problems associated with the creation and presentation of acting, musical, and technical challenges.
  • analyze the differences in producing musical theatre from other styles of theatre.

TA 481 Honors Seminar in History of Film

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above; ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:TA 312, 314, or 315; TA 312, 314, or 315
  • Advisory:TA 310
  • Transferable:CSU; UC ((TA 312, 481 & 314, 315 combined: maximum credit - 6 units, no credit unless taken after or concurrently with TA 312, 314, or 315))

This honors course (a supplement to TA 312, 314, and 315) provides a seminar for advanced students to view and analyze additional films important to the development of cinematic art to analyze and criticize those films in terms of acting, directing, writing, editing, cinematography, and genre. May be taken twice with different co requisites.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate writing skills for film criticism.
  • analyze film acting, directing, writing, cinematography, editing, sound. music, and genre.
  • assess film form and content.
  • compare and contrast analysis and evaluation of films with peers.
  • research individual artists and their work.

TA 494 Topics in Theatre Arts

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:27 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course covers topics in theatre which are not included in current course offerings. May require field trips. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 27-216 hours which may include theatrical studies, preparation or performance.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Analyze background and current status of special topic.
  • Evaluate concepts acquired from the special topic in practical applications.
  • Compare and contrast special topic information to regular curriculum information.
  • Develop and evaluate the techniques used in this topic.
  • Transfer knowledge learned in special topic research to practical application in other courses and endeavors.
  • Devise materials required for special topic and put them to practical use in other courses and endeavors.

TA 495 Independent Studies in Theatre Arts

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU


Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


TA 498 Work Experience in Theatre Arts

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position, or job related to theatre arts with a cooperating site supervisor. Students are advised to consult with the Theatre Arts Department faculty to review specific certificate and degree work experience requirements.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of theatre arts. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer-level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce, completion of Title 5 required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site, and developing workplace skills and competencies.

During the semester, the student is required to complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. All students are required to attend the first class meeting, a mid-semester meeting, and a final meeting. Additionally, students who have not already successfully completed a Work Experience course will be required to attend weekly orientations while returning participants may meet individually with the instructor as needed. Students may take up to 16 units total across all Work Experience course offerings. This course may be taken up to four times when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate application of industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in the field of theatre arts related to a transfer degree level career as written in the minimum three (3) learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course
  • make effective decisions, use workforce information, and manage his/her personal career plans.
  • behave professionally, ethically, and legally at work, consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and organizational norms.
  • behave responsibly at work, exhibiting initiative and self-management in situations where it is needed.
  • apply effective leadership styles at work, with consideration to group dynamics, team and individual decision making, and workforce diversity.
  • communicate in oral, written, and other formats, as needed, in a variety of contexts at work.
  • locate, organize, evaluate, and reference information at work.
  • demonstrate originality and inventiveness at work by combining ideas or information in new ways, making connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, and reshaping goals in ways that reveal new possibilities using critical and creative thinking skills such as logical reasoning, analytical thinking, and problem-solving.