Sociology

Sociology (SOC)

SOC 300 Introductory Sociology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines principles and basic concepts in sociology. It includes the study of institutions, culture, social organization, group interaction, social stratification, economy, politics, social movements, and urbanization. This course is not open to students who have completed SOC 480.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare various sociological perspectives and their relevance to the understanding of social life.
  • synthesize various sociological theories to enhance one's understanding of everyday life events and social experiences.
  • identify and discuss major issues facing the world today from a sociological standpoint.
  • relate sociological theories to the workings of various institutions and analyze social issues and events from a sociological standpoint.
  • define the role of human agency in shaping institutions and structures in society.
  • research and evaluate various economic, political, and social institutions in society.
  • apply the micro-sociological and interpersonal level analysis to social behavior.
  • apply macro-sociological and institutional and systemic analysis to social behavior.

SOC 301 Social Problems

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 115
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines contemporary social problems in the US within a theoretical and global context. It examines the role and the structure of power and ideology in shaping our understanding and approach to social problems. It includes a critical analysis of their causes, consequences as well as an evaluation of proposed solutions and methods of treatment. Attention is directed to poverty and inequality, race and gender inequalities, problems of the environment, unequal access to education as well as problems in the economic and political systems and the impact of globalization on these problems.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate understanding of major social problems in the US using sociological perspectives and concepts.
  • place local, regional, and national social problems in a global context.
  • examine and explain causes and consequences of social problems within a national and global context.
  • discuss how causes of social problems are structurally connected to their solutions.
  • define the role of various institutions, the structure of power, the role of ideology, and global forces as they pertain to the social construction of social problems, their causes and solutions.
  • analyze and interpret qualitative and quantitative information and evidence about social problems and how they are impacted by domestic and global socio-economic, political, and cultural processes.

SOC 309 Self and Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces concepts, social theories, and methods used to analyze how the sense of self is created in everyday life. It explores various theories of the development of self, the nature of human behavior, the importance of language for perception and thought, and reality as a social construction. Additionally, it examines how the self emerges and is maintained through social interaction and our involvement in social relationships. It includes the study of social identity, roles, socialization, identity change, and emotions.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast various sociological and other perspectives and their relevance to the understanding of self
  • explain the relationship between broad structural changes and strategies of self-management in everyday life
  • differentiate between various agents of socialization and their impact on the formation of self-identity
  • interpret the relationships between physical self, social/emotional self, and self-perception
  • analyze how social roles (obligations and expectations) are constructed and maintained through social interaction in everyday life
  • explain how gender, race/ethnicity, and social class intersect to shape the perception and presentation of self
  • evaluate impression management and emotion management as they apply to various institutional settings

SOC 318 Introduction to Crime, Deviance, and Social Control

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces various sociological perspectives regarding issues of crime, deviance, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of how laws and cultural norms shape the definition and meaning of crime and deviance. Topics covered include street crimes, corporate crimes, white-collar crimes, domestic violence, drugs and alcohol abuse, lifestyle crimes, prison systems, capital punishment, rehabilitation, and the trend towards privatization of prisons. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast various sociological perspectives and their relevance to the understanding of crime, deviance, and social control.
  • define basic terms and concepts regarding crime, deviance, and social control.
  • explain the nature and meaning of deviance as a function of cultural norms, politics, social status, and law.
  • apply various sociological theories to explain the process by which actions and behaviors come to be defined as deviant and/or criminal.
  • evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of sociological theories as they relate to deviance, crime, and social control.
  • differentiate between roles of various institutions of social control.
  • explain the complex structural nature of punishment, prisons, and rehabilitation.

SOC 320 Minorities in America

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines patterns of racial and ethnic group relations in the United States of America. It employs basic sociological approaches to the study of race and ethnicity, with an emphasis on a comparative analysis of historical, social, and economic factors affecting intergroup and intragroup dynamics. Topics include prejudice, discrimination, racism, racial and ethnic stratification, assimilation patterns among groups, demographic shifts, civil rights, and other related topics. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • utilize basic sociological approaches to race and ethnicity
  • define "minority status" and assess the attributes of minority groups within the broader U.S. society
  • evaluate and critique factors affecting assimilation of minority groups
  • compare and contrast the social construction and social experiences of major ethnic and racial groups in the U.S.
  • examine the importance of social systems in shaping and maintaining the dynamic relationship between dominant and subordinant groups
  • formulate macro level and micro level analyses of minority and dominant social issues
  • analyze current complex racial and ethnic issues and evaluate solutions
  • discuss the relationship among the individual, interpersonal, institutional, and systemic spheres
  • assess the various definitions of diversity

SOC 325 Chicano Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to fundamental concepts, social theories, and methods used to understand and critically analyze the production, adaptation, and construction of Chicano identity and Chicano culture within the United States. It includes micro and macro sociological analysis of Chicano culture and its relationship to Chicano social identity, social inequality, and social change.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain historical and cultural origins of Mexican-Americans in the United States
  • compare and contrast sociological paradigms’ approaches to Chicano culture
  • list and describe various elements of Chicano culture
  • evaluate differences between individual experiences of Chicano culture and systemic functions of Chicano culture
  • analyze connections between culture and the Chicano Movement
  • interpret how culture can be used to empower and oppress
  • differentiate between culture expression and stereotyping
  • generate and evaluate potential solutions to at least three of the modern cultural dilemmas Chicanos face in the United States today
  • describe and evaluate the demographic shift in the Chicano population in the United States
  • differentiate between ethnocentric and culturally relative analyses of Chicano culture and the Chicano movement

SOC 335 Sociology of Aging

  • Same As:GERON 300
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: SOC 335, GERON 300, 302, & PSYC 374 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the aged and aging process with emphasis on social factors affecting and affected by an aging population. It includes an analysis of demographics, history of aging in America, social conditions, resources and support systems, employment, retirement, and social class/cultural differences.
This course is not open to students who have completed GERON 300.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • chart the demographic shift in America as it relates to older adults and evaluate the concept of generational equity
  • explain at least five of the major implications and challenges of increased longevity as they relate to end-of-life issues, advocacy, adult abuse, filial responsibility, generational equity, and entitlements
  • compare major biological theories with social theories of aging
  • explain the major social issues as related to aging in America and their possible solutions
  • analyze the overall economic position of older Americans, including retirement plans, health care, job outlook, and entitlements
  • calculate the cost of the average funeral and construct cost-saving measures

SOC 342 Gender Relations in American Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course deals with gender relations in American society. It examines historical, social, economic, political, and cultural forces in shaping gender identity, gender roles, and gender expectations. This course utilizes sociological theories to explain gender experiences as socially constructed rather than biologically determined. Specifically, it examines the experiences of people of diverse economic, racial, and ethnic backgrounds within historical and cross-cultural perspectives. This course includes analysis and discussion of topics such as gender relations in the home, workplace, mass media, health care system, and politics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate various sociological perspectives relevant to gender socialization, gender identity formation, and gender inequalities.
  • construct a sociological and theoretical understanding of gender socialization in terms of how men's and women's experiences diverge in regarding family life, workplace, media, politics, education, and science.
  • compare men's and women's lives as historically and culturally created realities and experiences.
  • explain historical and theoretical causes and consequences of gender inequality in American society.
  • discuss the role of various social, economic, political, religious, and cultural institutions in creating, reinforcing, and perpetuating gender inequality.
  • utilize theory, history, and quantitative information to remedy gender inequality in American society.

SOC 350 Sociology of Popular Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes the historical development and emergence of American popular culture and the relationship between contemporary popular culture, social institutions and collective behavior. Further, it considers popular culture within the context of social, political, and economic changes in the United States and includes an analysis of theories of popular culture, hegemony, advertising, music, and film.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the impact of differing popular culture products on different audiences through reception and consumption approaches.
  • Evaluate American popular culture products by utilizing the sociological perspective.
  • Define key terms relating the study of popular culture.
  • Critique the works and perspectives of sociological and cultural studies theorists like Marx, Adorno, Benjamin, Weber, Veblin, Goffman, Gramsci, and Durkheim.
  • Examine the effects of subcultural and counter-cultural practice and objects on American society.
  • Apply core concepts within the study of popular culture to historically relevant events and examples.
  • Compare and contrast the main differences among core sociological theories such as conflict theory, structural functionalism, symbolic interactionism, and feminist theory and their application to popular culture.
  • Analyze the historical, cultural, economic, and political influences on representations relating to race, class, gender, sexual orientation, and nationality.
  • Evaluate various arguments related to the debate on taste with special emphasis on high culture, low culture, and folk culture.

SOC 480 Introductory Sociology - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0; IGETC Area 4J
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an in-depth examination of society and human behavior from various sociological perspectives. Sociological theories, both macro and micro, are applied to different aspects of life including culture, social stratification and inequality, conflict and social change, and politics and economy. The class is conducted as a seminar in which students will be responsible for developing in-depth analysis and understanding of issues based on classical and contemporary sociological theories. This course is designed for those from all academic disciplines who are motivated to learn sociological perspectives and how they apply to all aspects of human experience both at the individual and societal levels. The honors section utilizes a rigorous and an intensive instructional methodology designed to challenge motivated students.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic sociological terminology and concepts
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as forms of scientific evidence
  • analyze various theoretical perspectives used by sociologists to explain institutional patterns and social events
  • identify the evidence that logically supports different sociological perspectives
  • explain the causes and consequences of issues and events within a sociological framework
  • critique the theoretical adequacy of different sociological perspectives
  • assess the empirical validity of the premises argued by various classical and contemporary sociological theories
  • synthesize alternative interpretations about social systems and human action with a focus on how social, economic, political, and historical forces intersect to shape social life
  • evaluate the role of human agency in bringing about conflict and social change
  • apply the pros and cons of various sociological perspectives to the socio-economic, political, and cultural topics at hand

SOC 495 Independent Studies in Sociology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.