Recreation

Recreation (RECR)

RECR 300 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course is an overview of recreation, park, and leisure services. It covers recreation as a form of community service, as well as the nature, scope, and significance of leisure and recreation as a social force in contemporary society. It emphasizes the role of the professional leader in organizing recreation programs and services, operations, facilities, and resources. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe philosophical foundations of leisure and recreation.
  • explain the bases for growing interest in recreation and leisure activities.
  • analyze recreation and leisure program components.
  • identify the sociological, psychological, and economic implications of parks and recreation.
  • define the functions and services of recreational agencies from local to federal levels.
  • demonstrate face-to-face leadership skills in program planning and operations.
  • identify the challenges, issues, programs, and trends in the recreation movement.

RECR 310 Outdoor Recreation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course is an orientation to job opportunities in the outdoor recreation field. It includes an overview of different types of outdoor recreation, socio-economic factors in outdoor recreation, the role of government, the role of the private sector, management, and issues and trends in outdoor recreation. Philosophies and operating purposes of outdoor recreation facilities run by federal, state, and local governments are discussed. Field trips are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe and identify job opportunities with outdoor recreation agencies and suppliers.
  • distinguish between the operation of local, state, and federal recreation agencies.
  • analyze and describe solutions to problems and issues facing outdoor recreation agencies.
  • design a plan for an outdoor recreation facility.
  • create and lead an outdoor recreation activity.
  • identify risk management in outdoor programming.
  • analyze the purpose and quality of outdoor recreational activities.

RECR 320 Recreation Activity Leadership

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300: OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU

This is a basic course for recreation majors, involving a study of essential elements and basic principles of organization and leadership of various types of recreation programs. It covers the methods and materials used in planning and conducting organized recreation programs in public and private agencies. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the face-to-face leader in organizing recreational programs in a variety of settings. Field trips are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a basic knowledge of program planning principles and activity leadership.
  • plan, organize, promote, and lead organized recreation programs and special events.
  • list, plan, and execute events for specific populations.
  • interpret and apply the principles of planning and development of recreation programs.

RECR 498 Work Experience in Recreation

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position, or job related to recreation with a cooperating site supervisor. Students are advised to consult with the Physical Education Department faculty to review specific certificate and degree work experience requirements.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of recreation. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer-level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce, completion of Title 5 required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site, and developing workplace skills and competencies.

During the semester, the student is required to complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. All students are required to attend the first class meeting, a mid-semester meeting, and a final meeting. Additionally, students who have not already successfully completed a Work Experience course will be required to attend weekly orientations while returning participants may meet individually with the instructor as needed. Students may take up to 16 units total across all Work Experience course offerings. This course may be taken up to four times when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate application of industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in the field of recreation related to a transfer degree level career as written in the minimum three (3) learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course
  • make effective decisions, use workforce information, and manage his/her personal career plans.
  • behave professionally, ethically, and legally at work, consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and organizational norms.
  • behave responsibly at work, exhibiting initiative and self-management in situations where it is needed.
  • apply effective leadership styles at work, with consideration to group dynamics, team and individual decision making, and workforce diversity.
  • communicate in oral, written, and other formats, as needed, in a variety of contexts at work.
  • locate, organize, evaluate, and reference information at work.
  • demonstrate originality and inventiveness at work by combining ideas or information in new ways, making connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, and reshaping goals in ways that reveal new possibilities using critical and creative thinking skills such as logical reasoning, analytical thinking, and problem-solving.