Psychology

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 300 General Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 300, 305, & 480 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a broad overview of general principles of psychology. Topics include the scientific method, statistics, biological determinants, as well as general processes of behavior, such as development, learning, language, intelligence, perception, motivation, emotion, personality, and mental health. This course is not open to students who have taken PSYC 480.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare the major theoretical perspectives in psychology (e.g., behavioral, biological, cognitive, evolutionary, humanistic, psychodynamic, socio-cultural)
  • describe the general subject areas of psychology (e.g., biological, sensation and perception, learning and memory, cognition, consciousness, individual differences, psychometrics, personality, social processes, developmental/lifespan, emotion, motivation)
  • describe the applied areas of psychology (e.g., clinical, counseling, forensic, community, organizational, school health)
  • differentiate between commonly used research methods in psychology and their applications
  • apply psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to personal, interpersonal, occupational, and social/community contexts
  • incorporate systematic critical thinking in arriving at conclusions about behavior and mental processes
  • describe the roles that culture and diversity play in various aspects of human behavior and mental processes
  • distinguish between the ethical implications of psychological research and the responsibility to pursue and use knowledge wisely

PSYC 305 Psychology Applied to Modern Life

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 300, 305, & 480 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 115
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores human behavior, emphasizing the practical aspects of psychology in everyday life utilizing both psychological theory and research. Topics include personality, stress and coping, self-understanding, communication, interpersonal relationships, gender, sexuality, psychological disorders and their treatment, personality, personal values, and positive psychology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare the major theoretical perspectives in psychology
  • analyze the dimensions of effective behavior in an increasingly complex and culturally diverse world
  • define and use basic biological, physiological, and psychological terminology to describe adjustment and psychosocial development across the lifespan
  • describe specific research methods and the general principles of research ethics for the study of human beings, including the safeguards and the peer-review process in science
  • describe the physical and psychological effects of stress
  • evaluate the effectiveness of various coping strategies
  • distinguish between the most common psychological disorders and evaluate various treatment options
  • describe the principles involved in attraction, relationship maintenance, and interpersonal conflict
  • apply principles of effective communication in interpersonal relationships
  • evaluate the effects of detrimental behaviors (e.g., smoking, drinking, overeating, poor nutrition) on physical and psychological health
  • identify key aspects of the self-concept and the determinants of self-esteem
  • evaluate the contributions of family, peers, schools, religion, and the media on the formations of sexual attitudes and behavior
  • summarize the current research on the origins of sexual orientation and the adjustment of those with non-heterosexual orientations
  • evaluate research on gender similarities and differences

PSYC 310 Biological Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the physiological determinants of behavior and cognition. The role of genetics, neural development, neural communication and pathways, brain structures, neurotransmitters, drugs, endocrine system, and sensory systems in typical and atypical behavior and cognition are addressed. Current theories related to the role of neural and biological processes in the etiology and treatment of psychological disorders, motor disorders, and other central nervous pathologies are presented. Ethical standards for human and animal research are discussed.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • relate behavior and mental processes to anatomical, biological, chemical, and genetic mechanisms
  • describe processes of neural communication within a neuron and between neurons
  • explain the endocrine system and the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system including their relationships to behavior
  • evaluate current research findings related to neuroanatomical, biochemical, and genetic mechanisms of disorders
  • compare and contrast proposed treatments for psychological disorders, motor disorders, and other central nervous system pathologies
  • discriminate between the types of research methodologies which characterize the study of brain-behavior relationships and illustrate the scientific approach
  • critique and evaluate current research in biological psychology
  • explain invasive vs. noninvasive research methods and the general principles of research ethics for the study of animals and human beings, including the research safeguards and the peer-review process in science
  • describe the brain-behavior relationships associated with motivation, addiction, sex, sleep, stress, learning, and memory

PSYC 311 Biological Psychology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:PSYC 310
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course involves the applied study of the nervous system focusing on its anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and impact on behavioral and mental processes. It provides a foundation in the principles of the scientific method and practical experience in its application to the study of biological psychology. Specific topics include anatomy, physiology, and organization of the nervous system, with special emphasis on the brain; anatomy and physiology of the neuron; physiology of nerves and nerve conduction; the biochemistry of the synapse; anatomy and physiology of sensory systems; and psychophysical examination of sensation and perception. It utilizes brain dissection procedures, interactive computer simulations, and lab experiments with data collection and analysis.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the principles of the scientific method.
  • plan and conduct basic dissection of neural tissue.
  • discriminate the anatomical features of the central and peripheral nervous system, their functions, and connectivity.
  • distinguish cortical from subcortical structures and discuss their connectivity.
  • differentiate features of basic cellular anatomy.
  • compare the primary features of neurons, glia, and synapses at the cellular level.
  • compare the cellular structure, electrophysiology, and function of various types of neurons.
  • demonstrate proficiency with primary equipment and techniques used to investigate both brain and neuronal structure and function.
  • compare the basic processes of sensation and perception for the main sensory systems and the principles of psychophysics.
  • conduct basic psychophysical data collection and analysis procedures and interpret results.
  • compare various psychobiological research methods in terms of the type of information gained and their areas of application.

PSYC 320 Social Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 170
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course analyzes human behavior in relation to the social environment, including the power of the situation, other individuals, and the social group. Topics include aggression, prejudice, attraction, altruism, attitude change, conformity, gender roles, cultural norms, person perception, and social cognition.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the elements of a scientific approach to understanding human social behavior
  • contrast the social influences with the biological or other influences on behavior
  • explain the major scientific studies which form the basis for current theories of social psychology
  • describe the ways in which principles gleaned from social psychological research apply to real-world problems and issues
  • evaluate models of intervention into social behavior designed to address social problems
  • compare basic concepts and theories in the major areas of inquiry within the discipline of social psychology
  • identify individual and sociocultural differences with respect to the topics addressed in social psychology

PSYC 330 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 120, MATH 125, MATH 129, or MATH 133 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: STAT 300, 305, and PSYC 330 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area B4; IGETC Area 2
  • C-ID:C-ID MATH 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses upon the concepts and applications of descriptive and inferential statistics in psychology and other behavioral sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and sampling distributions, parametric and nonparametric statistical methods, hypothesis testing, statistical inference and power, correlation and regression, chi-square, t-tests, and analysis of variance procedures. Application of both hand computation and statistical software to data in a social science context is emphasized to include the interpretation of the relevance of the statistical findings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast statistical concepts relevant to research in the behavioral sciences.
  • perform the following probability and statistical calculations by hand: sample spaces, factorial notation, counting rules, permutations and combinations, laws of probability, calculating probability of events using elementary, expected value probability principles; mean, median, mode, standard deviation – sample and best estimate, variance, range and interquartile ranges for discrete and continuous distributions; correlation, covariance, and regression analyses to test hypotheses of association; and, t-tests, ANOVAs, and other appropriate statistical analyses (Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Wilcoxon Signed- Ranks, and Friedman ANOVA) to test hypotheses of difference.
  • calculate probabilities using t-distributions.
  • use statistical software such as SPSS, Excel, Minitab or a graphing calculator to perform probability and statistical calculations.
  • critique psychological literature that contains statistics.
  • formulate a testable hypothesis; analyze data using an appropriate statistical procedure; determine and interpret the statistical significance and p value of results; reflect upon correctness of the hypothesis.
  • analyze and appropriately interpret applications using data from various disciplines including business, social sciences, psychology, life sciences, health science, and education.
  • examine research reported in the media.

PSYC 335 Research Methods in Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 AND PSYC 330 or STAT 300 with a grade of 'C' or better.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ESLW 340 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the various psychological research methods and to the critical evaluation of research. It emphasizes research design, experimental procedures, descriptive methods, instrumentation, and the collection, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of research data. Research design and methodology are investigated through a review of research in a variety of sub-disciplines in psychology. Students gain knowledge in scientific writing, including proficiency in APA style.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the basic principles of the scientific method.
  • assess the purposes and limitations of the various research methods.
  • critically evaluate research reports in psychology.
  • synthesize a body of research findings.
  • develop and test hypotheses.
  • demonstrate knowledge of general research designs, experimental and non-experimental methods, and standard research practices.
  • select appropriate research designs to test hypotheses.
  • explain the ethical treatment of humans and animal participants in research and the institutional requirements for conducting research.
  • evaluate the generalizability of study results.
  • demonstrate proficiency in APA style.

PSYC 340 Abnormal Behavior

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300, 305, or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ELSR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 340 & 481 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the broad questions of normality and abnormality. Topics include the investigation of specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties and current approaches to psychological intervention including present community mental health practices. It considers the contribution of social, biological, and psychological factors to the development and persistence of behavior disorders. This class is not open to students who have taken PSYC 481.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate advanced theoretical aspects of "normal" and "abnormal" behavior
  • describe specific mental, emotional, and behavioral difficulties
  • analyze the mystery and prejudice that surrounds people experiencing severe problems in adaptive behavior
  • compare and contrast the approaches to psychological intervention including present community health practices
  • identify the contribution of social, biological, and psychological factors to the development and persistence of behavioral disorders

PSYC 342 Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on basic behavioral principles that describe relations between operant behavior and the social and physical environment. Behavior is examined as a part of the natural world and in everyday situations. The primary focus is on principles of operant conditioning, such as reinforcement, extinction, differential reinforcement, and punishment, as they are related to naturally occurring events. Additional topics include experimental and intervention procedures of applied behavioral analysis. It also covers practical applications including self management, institutional settings, schools, child behavior management, as well as treatment of developmental disorders such as Autism and Asperger’s disorders.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the basic terminology and methodology of applied behavioral analysis and operant conditioning principles
  • choose the appropriate research method to answer a specific question in applied behavioral analysis
  • distinguish between the ethical implications of behavioral analysis research and the ethical applications of applied behavioral analysis interventions.
  • demonstrate principles of applied behavior analysis, including the conceptualization of individual or group behavior in terms of environmental determinants, identification of target behavior in a behavior modification plan, and ways to support contingencies of positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, extinction and punishment
  • propose a specific behavior modification program utilizing the principles of applied behavioral analysis.

PSYC 354 The Psychology of Family Life and Intimate Relationships in a Diverse Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • C-ID:C-ID SOCI 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of family life and intimate relationships from historical, sociological, and psychological viewpoints. Topics include elements for building and maintaining intimate relationships, the structure and functions of the family, sexuality, parenting, gender roles, partner selection, conflict, crisis, divorce, and starting over.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare concepts from psychology, sociology, and related disciplines used to describe the establishment and maintenance of intimate relationships
  • evaluate research methods used to study intimate relationships, including marriage and the family
  • contrast various theoretical models used to understand intimate relationships and family dynamics
  • examine current research on courtship, cohabitation, mate selection, gender roles, marital stages, family planning, family diversity, child-rearing, conflict resolution, family disorganization, sexuality in intimate relationships, starting over, and trends shaping the family of the future
  • evaluate nonempirical conclusions about the present health of marriage and the family, particularly as represented in uncritical media accounts
  • apply key concepts to personal relationships and life experiences

PSYC 356 Human Sexuality

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D4; CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4D; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course offers a balanced scientific understanding of the biopsychosocial perspective on human sexual behavior from birth through adulthood. It provides factual, up-to-date, nonjudgmental information designed to dispel myths, and to facilitate problem identification and possible solutions. Sexuality is explored from historical, cultural, psychological, physiological, sociological, and legal viewpoints.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine sexual behavior from historical, cultural, religious, and legal points of view.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the scientific method as it relates to key research findings pertaining to the diversity of human sexual behaviors.
  • compare male and female anatomical structures and their functions.
  • demonstrate awareness and skills to make healthy and responsible choices and decisions regarding relationships and sexuality.
  • compare and contrast biological, psychological, and cultural similarities and diversity in human sexual behavior.
  • examine, analyze, and compare the diverse experiences that influence human sexual behaviors with particular emphasis on historical and cultural practices of human sexual behaviors.
  • examine, analyze, and contrast the factors that influence diverse human sexual behaviors including causes and the evaluation of possible solutions to multiple ethnocentric problems.

PSYC 358 Principles of Interpersonal Relations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the principles involved in effective interpersonal relationships. Topics include interpersonal feedback, self-disclosure, listening, the role of emotions, conflict resolution, personal values, and self-awareness. Emphasis is on methods to enhance relationships at home, work, and school.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the relationship between self-awareness and interpersonal relationships, as well as demonstrate an increased self-awareness.
  • examine components of effective communication and utilize effective communication skills (e.g., assertiveness, active listening, self-disclosure) in interpersonal relationships.
  • compare and contrast features of health and unhealthy relationships.
  • evaluate strengths and weaknesses of current relationships and apply skills for developing and enriching these relationships.
  • compare and contrast the strengths and challenges faced by the different forms of the family.

PSYC 359 Stress Management and Health

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the connection between stress, stress response, coping, and health. It covers various types of stressors, stress responses, and coping strategies, and the scientific research in these areas. Topics include the impact of stress on physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional health. This course focuses on developing healthy ways to cope with stress, including cognitive-behavioral techniques, mindfulness, and relaxation techniques.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess typical stressors and compile a list of the typical stressors that may be encountered, including both positive and negative stressors.
  • compare and contrast different theories on the types of coping strategies for handling stressors and types of strategies for stress management.
  • assess the types of coping and stress management strategies in terms of effectiveness and ineffectiveness.
  • explain the physiological processes associated with stress and the potential health effects to physical, behavioral, cognitive, and emotional health of experiencing long-term chronic stress.
  • evaluate media reports on suggestions to improve health and manage stress using current research based findings.

PSYC 361 Psychology of Women in a Multicultural Society

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D3; CSU Area D4; CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4C; IGETC Area 4D; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the psychological effects of society upon women. It emphasizes the exploration of gender roles, sex roles, and stereotypes, as well as the sociocultural, intrapersonal, and interpersonal factors in the development of women.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the psychological influences of the effect of gender in the use of language
  • compare and contrast the psychological influences of gender in the world of work
  • analyze the differences and influences of personality and behavior as they contribute to the ethnic experience of women of color
  • analyze the biopsychosocial aspects of sexuality
  • describe the behavioral similarities and/or differences between Euro-American women and women of color

PSYC 365 Issues of Diverse Populations

  • Same As:HSER 330
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the values, problems, issues, concerns and counseling needs of diverse populations by race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, physical/cognitive/emotional/developmental ability, and age. It also explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of prejudice as it relates to institutional and individual discrimination. This course is not open to students who have completed HSER 330.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and examine specific values, beliefs, and practices of diverse populations by race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, ability/disability, age, and socioeconomic class
  • evaluate the impact of bias, stereotyped thinking, prejudice, and discrimination in working with diverse populations
  • analyze the issues of racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, ageism, and classism as they relate to working with diverse populations
  • develop culturally responsive prevention, intervention, and/or resolution to identified issues and problems affecting diverse populations
  • assess one's personal attitudes regarding diverse populations

PSYC 370 Human Development: A Life Span

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 180
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines human development across the lifespan, from conception through death, by focusing on the main domains in developmental psychology (physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional) as well as the interaction among these domains. Emphasis is placed on development as an on-going process, with an effort to encourage the practical application of the knowledge acquired. This course is designed to provide a foundation for careers in educational, social, psychological, and medical fields as well as a better understanding of one's own developmental process.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine how development evolves from conception through death
  • evaluate the various domains of development (cognitive, physical, socio-emotional) and the interconnection among them
  • examine how people are influenced by their genes, their families, and the world in which they live
  • compare and contrast different theoretical perspectives used in explaining human development and behavior
  • compare and contrast different scientific methods used to study human development and behavior
  • evaluate the concept of continuity of development throughout the lifespan by assessing how experiences at one time of life may affect future development

PSYC 372 Child Development

  • Same As:ECE 312
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 372, 373, and ECE 312 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the growth and development of children from the prenatal stage through adolescence. For each stage of development, the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social-moral, and emotional aspects of development, with attention to both typical as well as atypical development in each area, are discussed. Included are the influences of culture, family, and the interaction of maturational and environmental factors. This material is designed as a foundation for early care and education, teaching, and parenting. This course is not open to students who have completed ECE 312.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify typical and atypical developmental stages and characteristics of children from birth through adolescence
  • describe current and prominent theories of child development
  • apply theories to teaching and child-rearing practices
  • identify typical behavior of children and the individual differences and special needs (physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development)
  • analyze the influence of culture, family, society, and environment and the roles they play in the child's development

PSYC 373 Child Psychology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory: Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 372, 373, and ECE 312 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the science of child psychology through the analysis of developmental theories and research. It examines key developmental events across the main domains in developmental psychology (physical, cognitive, socioemotional) are examined from conception through adolescence. Questions about development are investigated, with an emphasis on the role of the scientific method. It explores typical and atypical psychological development research is explored as well as the influences of culture, society, family, and physical environments on children’s behavior and mental processes. Additionally, this course provides a scientific foundation for future studies in social sciences, including psychology.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate key developmental events across the main domains in developmental psychology (physical, cognitive, socioemotional), from conception through adolescence.
  • describe uses of the scientific method within developmental psychology.
  • evaluate current and prominent developmental theories of child psychology.
  • evaluate classic and current research in the area of child psychology.
  • compare individual differences in typical behavior in children.
  • differentiate typical from atypical psychological development in children.
  • analyze the influences of culture, society, family, and physical environments on children’s behavior and mental processes.
  • apply child psychology principles to one’s interactions with children (personal and/or professional).
  • relate the connection between the study of child psychology to other disciplines.
  • utilize critical thinking in arriving at conclusions about child psychology.

PSYC 374 Psychology of Aging: Adult Development and Aging

  • Same As:GERON 302
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 374, GERON 300, 302, & SOC 335 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the physical, psychological, and social aspects of the aging process including the interactions between the elderly and the rest of society. Topics include an analysis of stereotypes, social bonds, environmental factors, sexuality, physical health, mental health, death, and bereavement. This course is not open to students who have completed GERON 302.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and explain the differences between gerontology and geriatrics and explain the changing age demographics both in the United States and globally.
  • describe at least four commonly held myths, stereotypes, or ageist attitudes regarding older adults and explain the impact these attitudes have on the image of aging.
  • analyze and predict three ways race, gender, and ethnicity might influence the aging process.
  • analyze the concepts of successful aging and optimal aging and recognize the differences between at least three normal and three abnormal age changes.
  • describe at least three biological and three social theories used to predict how an individual might respond to the aging process or to old age.
  • discuss and incorporate the concept of family and intimate relationships in later life and the importance of convoys or networks in the individual process of aging.
  • explain at least three of the financial costs associated with aging.
  • describe the concept of “aging in place” using at least three local and national resources, two entitlements, and three healthcare options.
  • identify an elder who is aging optimally and describe at least three lifestyle choices, based on gerontological theory, that the student feels altered his/her aging process.

PSYC 378 Communicating with and Validating Older Adults

  • Same As:GERON 330
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:GERON 302 or PSYC 374 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Current tuberculosis clearance
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better;
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the basic theory, techniques, and experiences for communication with, validation of, and stimulation of the elderly at different cognitive levels in long-term care. After the first class session, this course is held off campus in a long-term care setting. This course is not open to students who have completed GERON 330.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate basic communication needs of seniors and utilize appropriate level of validation theory and techniques
  • demonstrate skill, ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills when communicating with the elderly at different cognitive levels
  • assemble and use a kit of materials to facilitate sensory stimulation, validation, and reminiscence therapies

PSYC 379 Reminiscence Therapy

  • Same As:GERON 334
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:GERON 302 or PSYC 374 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Current tuberculosis clearance
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the basic theory and techniques of reminiscence therapy and provides experience in planning, facilitating, and evaluating reminiscence groups with the elderly in an institutional setting. After the first class session, this course is held off campus in a long-term care setting. This class is not open to students who have completed GERON 334.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze basic group counseling theories and apply to reminiscence techniques used with the elderly
  • analyze the effects of reminiscence therapy on the aging process
  • evaluate participants' cognitive levels and interests and choose the appropriate subject for reminiscence
  • detect and respond to individual needs within the group
  • demonstrate skill, ease, confidence, rapport, and listening skills in facilitating reminiscence groups
  • explain the basic process of memory construction
  • analyze the staff-development benefits from engaging in reminiscence with older adults
  • demonstrate social inclusion using reminiscence therapy
  • demonstrate techniques used to encourage reminiscence with people who have dementia and live in a facility
  • examine his/her individual boundaries and explain why they are important to maintain in reminiscence groups

PSYC 390 Psychology of Death and Dying

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course investigates beliefs, attitudes, anxieties, and behaviors associated with dying and death. Information about suicide, life-threatening illnesses, bereavement, and euthanasia are presented.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe basic demographic information on death, grieving, and related experiences
  • describe the psychological, social, philosophical, and legal issues related to death
  • evaluate information regarding the practical, everyday procedures and practices involved in dealing with death in our own lives
  • assess personal attitudes and values concerning death

PSYC 400 Introduction to Chemical Dependency

  • Same As:HSER 340
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area E1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the biopsychosociocultural effects of chemical dependency on the individual and the family. It includes an analysis of drug use; misuse and abuse across age, gender, race, ethnicity, and economic conditions contributing to substance abuse; and a description of community efforts at prevention and treatment. This course is not open to students who have completed HSER 340.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the psychological, physiological, and sociocultural issues related to substance use, misuse, and abuse
  • describe the psychological and physiological progression of substance abuse
  • examine the dynamics of race, ethnicity, age, and gender inherent in substance use, misuse, and abuse situations including drug preferences and codependency
  • compare and contrast the key components of assessment and recovery programs for alcoholism and drug abuse including Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Narcotics Anonymous (NA), Al-Anon, American Counseling Association (ACA), private and public, inpatient and outpatient

PSYC 401 Physiology and Pharmacology: Alcohol & Other Drugs

  • Same As:HSER 341
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 102 or ESLW 320 and HSER 340 or PSYC 400 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the chemical composition of alcohol and the mechanism of action of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs, including opiates, stimulants, depressants, psychotherapeutics, and psychedelics. It also includes the social and psychological implications of tolerance, habituation, and substance abuse of the user and abuser. This course is not open to students who have completed HSER 341.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the psychological, physiological, and sociological issues related to substance abuse
  • compare the effects of each class of psychoactive drugs upon the human body.
  • define the biological, social, and psychological implications of psychoactive drug use, misuse, and abuse.
  • describe the effects of psychoactive drugs on behavior.
  • analyze treatment issues and challenges.
  • compare intervention and treatment approaches.
  • examine alternatives to drug use.

PSYC 402 Alcoholism: Intervention, Treatment & Recovery

  • Same As:HSER 342
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:HSER 341 or PSYC 401 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study and evaluation of techniques used in the treatment of chemical dependency. Topics include intervention, individual and group counseling, detoxification, twelve-step program, therapeutic communities, and aftercare programs. This course is not open to students who have completed HSER 342.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze drug and alcohol use, misuse, abuse, and addiction
  • compare various theories of drug and alcohol addiction
  • differentiate treatment issues of drug and alcohol use, misuse, abuse, and addiction
  • describe treatment methods and counseling approaches of drug and alcohol use, misuse, abuse, and addiction

PSYC 415 Studying in London: Psychological Elements of British Life and Culture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course, offered in a London study abroad program, surveys elements in British history and culture that have influenced the science of psychology. Special emphasis is given to the influences of Sigmund Freud, Charles Darwin, Sir Francis Galton, and the events of World War II to current psychological theories. Additionally, the course examines the psychology behind various elements of British life including the monarchy, popular society, counter culture, art, and history. Field trips are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the basic elements of psychology as a scientific discipline, including its subject matter and methodology
  • evaluate the ideas and theories of various historical British contributors to current psychological models
  • interpret the psychological background of the art and historical monuments of England
  • identify basic psychological principles in everyday British culture, people, and events
  • compare and contrast British culture with one's own culture in terms of psychological models
  • analyze the effects of culture on human thinking and behavior

PSYC 480 Honors General Principles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 300, 305, & 480 combined: maximum credit, one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is for psychology majors, behavioral science majors, and other students who desire a challenging, issues-oriented introduction to the general principles of psychology. Topics include the scientific method, statistics, biological determinants, and general processes of behavior, such as development, learning, language, intelligence, perception, motivation, emotion, personality, and mental health. Emphasizing critical thinking in a seminar style, the focus is on thorough analysis and evaluation of psychological theories and research studies as they relate to practical, everyday issues. This course is not open to students who have completed PSYC 300.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and historical trends in psychology
  • examine applications of psychological concepts, theories, and research findings to personal, interpersonal, occupational, and social/community contexts
  • incorporate systematic critical thinking in arriving at conclusions about behavior and mental processes
  • examine the role that culture and diversity play in the various aspects of human behavior and mental processes
  • differentiate between the various psychological research methods and their applications
  • distinguish between the ethical implications of psychological research and the responsibility to pursue and use knowledge wisely

PSYC 481 Honors Abnormal Behavior

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSYC 300, 305, or 480 with a grade of "C" or better; Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 340 & 481 combined: maximum credit, one course))
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID PSY 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is for psychology majors, behavioral science majors, and others who desire a challenging, critical thinking, and issues-oriented exploration of normality and abnormality. It examines the origins, symptoms, and treatment of psychological disorders through first-person accounts, role of multicultural factors, and various theoretical stances. It focuses on thorough analysis and evaluation of biopsychosocial theories and research studies as they relate to the development and persistence of behavior disorders and treatment approaches. Field trips may be required. This course is not open to students who have taken PSYC 340.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • appraise various aspects of "normal" and "abnormal" behavior
  • extrapolate theories of psychopathology from scientific data and critically analyze the implications of those theories
  • differentiate specific psychological disorders
  • evaluate current approaches to treatment of psychological disorders including psychosocial rehabilitation
  • debate legal, ethical, and social issues in mental health
  • develop researchable hypotheses regarding biological, psychological, and social factors to the development and persistence of behavioral disorders

PSYC 495 Independent Studies in Psychology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.