Philosophy

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 300 Introduction to Philosophy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID PHIL 100

This course examines some of the perennial questions that have been addressed in the history of philosophy. Some of these include: Do we have free will? Is there a God? What is knowledge? What is the fundamental nature of reality? What makes actions right or wrong? This examination includes a critical analysis of fundamental concepts involved in the issues addressed by these questions, as well as an evaluation of reasoning used to defend various answers to them.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically evaluate views concerning free will, the existence of God, the fundamental nature of reality, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • compare and contrast differing theories concerning free will, the existence of God, the fundamental nature of reality, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments from primary sources concerning free will, the existence of God, the fundamental nature of reality, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • assess presuppositions underlying various views concerning free will, the existence of God, the fundamental nature of reality, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • formulate reasons to justify one’s beliefs concerning free will, the existence of God, the fundamental nature of reality, or other ideas addressed in the course.

PHIL 310 Introduction to Ethics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 and ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID PHIL 120

This course is an introduction to ethics and moral philosophy. It includes a survey of various normative ethical theories including Aristotle's Virtue Ethics, Utilitarianism, and Kant's Deontological Ethics. It may also cover various meta-ethical issues such as ethical relativism vs. ethical objectivism, as well as questions of knowledge and justification of moral claims. It may also include the application of normative ethical theories to contemporary moral issues.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and critically analyze arguments from primary sources in defense of various normative ethical theories such as Aristotle's Virtue Ethics, Kant's Deontological Ethics, and Utilitarianism.
  • compare and contrast differing ethical theories concerning good, evil, right, and wrong.
  • identify and analyze the reasoning underlying moral arguments and their components.
  • determine and critically assess presuppositions underlying various views about moral right and wrong.

PHIL 315 Contemporary Moral Issues

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This is an investigation into some of the moral issues our society presently faces. These issues may include abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering, individual liberty and the collective good, sexuality/gender and society, war and terrorism, capital punishment, hunger/poverty and moral obligation, discrimination, and affirmative action.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically evaluate views concerning abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, or other topics addressed in the course.
  • compare and contrast differing theories concerning abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, or other topics addressed in the course.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments from primary sources concerning abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, or other topics addressed in the course.
  • assess presuppositions underlying various views concerning abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, or other topics addressed in the course.
  • formulate reasons to justify one’s beliefs concerning abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, or other topics addressed in the course.

PHIL 320 Logic and Critical Reasoning

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3
  • C-ID:C-ID PHIL 110

This course introduces basic principles of good reasoning. It focuses on recognizing arguments and identifying their premises and conclusions. It examines the distinction between inductive and deductive standards of evaluation and includes an overview of types of inductive reasoning, deductive argument patterns, use and misuse of language, and fallacious reasoning. Practical application to everyday life is emphasized.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify arguments in everyday contexts.
  • analyze arguments into their constituent premises and conclusions.
  • distinguish between good and poor reasoning.
  • identify and explain a minimum of six common fallacies in reasoning.
  • explain the nature of deductive reasoning, including the difference between deductively valid and invalid arguments.
  • explain common types of inductive reasoning, including the difference between inductively strong and weak arguments.
  • identify various ways the use of language affects reasoning.

PHIL 324 Symbolic Logic

  • Same As:MATH 320
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:MATH 120, 125, 129, or 133 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID PHIL 210

This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. It includes a study of the logic of sentences (propositional logic) and the logic of classes and relations (predicate logic), together with an introduction to the nature of deductive systems. This course is not open to students who have completed MATH 320.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • represent statements of English in well-formed sentences of predicate logic.
  • prove the validity of statements and arguments in predicate logic using formal proof techniques.
  • apply truth table or truth tree methods to determine semantic properties such as invalidity and consistency.
  • construct interpretations that satisfy statements and sets of statements.
  • distinguish classical first order logical systems from other logical systems.

PHIL 330 History of Classical Philosophy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID PHIL 130

This course is a survey of classical Greek philosophy. Through a careful examination of primary sources, it begins with an overview of Pre-Socratic thought and focuses primarily on the philosophical ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. An overview of Hellenistic and Roman philosophy may be included.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast differing views expressed by ancient Greek philosophers--especially Plato and Aristotle--concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, and ethics.
  • critically evaluate views expressed by ancient Greek philosophers concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, and ethics.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments from ancient Greek primary sources concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, and ethics.
  • formulate reasons to justify the student's beliefs about the theories expressed by Plato and Aristotle concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, and ethics.

PHIL 331 History of Modern Philosophy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID PHIL 140

This course is an overview of important themes in the history of Western Philosophical thought from the Early Modern era to the turn of the nineteenth century. These themes may include the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, values, society, God, and human nature.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically evaluate views concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, mind, ethics, language and meaning, logic and mathematics, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • compare and contrast differing theories concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, mind, ethics, language and meaning, logic and mathematics, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments from primary sources concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, mind, ethics, language and meaning, logic and mathematics, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • assess presuppositions underlying various views concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, mind, ethics, language and meaning, logic and mathematics, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • formulate reasons to justify one’s beliefs concerning the fundamental nature of reality, knowledge, mind, ethics, language and meaning, logic and mathematics, or other ideas addressed in the course.

PHIL 350 Philosophy of Religion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course is an introduction to a philosophical examination of religion. This examination typically includes an analysis of basic religious concepts such as God, the afterlife, the soul, faith, karma, religious experience, good, and evil. The rationality of religious belief and the relation of religion to science may also be covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically evaluate views concerning the existence of God, the afterlife, religious faith, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • compare and contrast differing theories concerning the existence of God, the afterlife, religious faith, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments from primary sources concerning the existence of God, the afterlife, religious faith, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • assess presuppositions underlying various views concerning the existence of God, the afterlife, religious faith, or other ideas addressed in the course.
  • formulate reasons to justify one’s beliefs concerning the existence of God, the afterlife, religious faith, or other ideas addressed in the course.

PHIL 360 Social/Political Philosophy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G

This course is a historical and topical survey of significant themes of social/political philosophy from Plato to the present. Topics may include freedom, government, justice, law, rights, punishment, war, authority, and the state.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically examine personal views concerning justice, the nature of the state, or other ideas central to social/political thought.
  • compare and contrast differing theories of freedom, justice, or other ideas central to social/political thought.
  • distinguish between subjective certainty of a belief and justification for that belief.
  • determine presuppositions underlying various views concerning society and politics.
  • analyze and evaluate arguments from primary sources concerning social/political issues.

PHIL 495 Independent Studies in Philosophy

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU