International Studies

International Studies (IS)

IS 301 Introduction to Global Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D

This course introduces an interdisciplinary and multi-dimensional understanding of the process of globalization, including its history, socio-economic, political, and cultural causes and consequences. It focuses on how nation-states are increasingly becoming part of complex interconnected global economic, political, social, cultural, and ecological systems and structures. This course deals with how the actions of one nation state shapes trends and events in other nations. It also deals with how actions and events in one nation create a ripple effect across the globe and the extent to which nation-states are able to maintain a level of national autonomy and national identity within a global system. It utilizes globalization theories to provide a scientific framework for understanding various aspects of globalization including socio-economic, political, cultural, and ecological benefits and costs.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and describe various definitions and meanings of globalization
  • identify and define concepts and terms pertaining to globalization
  • analyze various historical, political, socio-economic, and cultural causes and forces involved in the process of globalization
  • compare and contrast the impact and consequences of globalization on different regions and across continents
  • apply theories of globalization to examples from different regions of the globe to understand varied intended and unintended outcomes of globalization
  • discuss the extent to which nation-states are able to act autonomously and maintain their national identity within an increasingly interconnected global system

IS 302 Issues in Global Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D

This course introduces the origins, current status, and future trends of major transnational issues confronting the global community. Topics include economic development and inequality, environmental issues and challenges, human rights, human security (food, water, and health care), international conflict and security issues, migration, and population trends. This course also focuses on global governance, including the study of collective global responsibility.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify major recurring and emerging global issues
  • analyze one or more specific global problems of international or regional nature
  • discuss approaches to global problems from an international perspective
  • analyze the interconnections between and among global issues
  • compare and evaluate the efficacy of national, regional, and international efforts to solve problems associated with global issues
  • analyze the role of non-state actors and transnational organizations in causing, responding to, and resolving global issues
  • evaluate the relationship between globalization and specific global issues

IS 305 Introduction to Middle East Studies

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G

This course introduces the contemporary Middle East from global and interdisciplinary perspectives. It covers the major developments and events that have shaped the socio-economic and political institutions and structures within a distinct geopolitical area. This course examines processes of state formation, colonialism, independence movements, major power players in the region, and the modern challenges of globalization. It also covers the consequences for foreign policy. Countries may include but are not limited to: Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Tunisia. This course provides a foundation in Middle East Studies in the context of a globally interconnected world system.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain current socio-economic and political dynamics in the Middle East in a global context.
  • identify major economic and political actors/forces as well as political structures and systems in the Middle East.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the region and the major ongoing domestic and global forces that shape Middle Eastern countries.
  • analyze the significance of the Middle East in the context of United States, Western European, and other powers' interests in the region.
  • examine and critique existing social scientific perspectives on the Middle East.
  • construct a critical understanding of the complex nature of Middle Eastern politics and culture within global and interdisciplinary perspective.
  • formulate a scientific understanding of the region, free of stereotypes and anecdotes.

IS 310 Peace and Conflict

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G

This course examines the political and socioeconomic causes and consequences of peace and conflict from different theoretical views. It includes an analysis of inter- and intra-state conflicts and wars, terrorism, ethnic and sectarian conflicts, and gender issues and conflicts. Additional topics include war theory, "negative peace," post-conflict reconciliation, policy recommendations and proposed solutions for conflict resolution, and achieving peace through the engagement of the global community. This course is formerly known as SOCSC 310.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast various socio-economic, political, and cultural theories of the causes of conflict and war
  • analyze the origins/causes, escalation, spread of conflict, violence, and war within various theoretical frameworks
  • evaluate the termination, consequences, and future of both conventional and nonconventional wars
  • analyze proposed conventional and nonconventional recommendations and solutions to conflict resolutions and attainment of sustainable peace including solutions such as arms control, alliances, economic development, and diplomacy
  • apply problem-solving approaches to issues which include international law, international organizations, interdependence, global and regional integration, and prospects for world peace

IS 312 Current Global Development Issues

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G

This course covers current socio-economic and political issues in developing countries in a global context. It presents alternative theories pertaining to the causes and consequences of development, underdevelopment, and uneven development with a particular focus on the issues of globalization including political and social change. It also includes proposed solutions to various development problems from various scientific perspectives.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate, compare, and contrast various theories of development and social change in a global context.
  • explain internal and external causes and consequences of development, underdevelopment, and uneven development within the various theoretical frameworks.
  • explain the relative usefulness of proposed solutions provided by different theories of development and social change in the context of a globally interconnected world.
  • relate theories of development and social change to proposed development policies that are dictated by the forces of globalization and are implemented in developing economies.
  • compare and contrast the effects of various development policies on developing countries and their people.
  • define the role of agencies of social change and development both domestic and international within a globally connected world.
  • assess the impact of actions taken by one nation on the global community.