Homeland Security

Homeland Security (HLS)

HLS 300 Introduction to Homeland Security

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the vocabulary and various components of homeland security. Emphasis is placed on the agencies associated with homeland security and their interrelated duties and relationships. Critical threats confronting homeland security, historical events impacting homeland security, and related state, national, and international laws are examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • outline the essential characteristics of national and international acts of terrorism.
  • construct a historical time-line reflecting significant terrorist threats and events in the United States and globally.
  • solve critical incident problems as an individual and in a coordinated team setting.
  • compose a historical time-line reflecting methods and outcomes used by national and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism.
  • classify the roles, functions of, and interdependency among local, federal and international law enforcement and military agencies to counter and combat terrorism.
  • differentiate between ethical and unethical attitudes and actions regarding the execution of homeland security practices.
  • identify the characteristics, ideologies, motives and behaviors of various extremist and terrorist groups that foster and support terrorist and criminal activities.
  • interpret forensic evidence to reconstruct a crime.

HLS 302 Intelligence Analysis and Security Management

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines intelligence analysis and its relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks and natural disasters, as well as vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors. Emphasis is placed on ethical principles and how the intelligence community operates in support of federal, state, and local homeland security agencies.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain operational knowledge of intelligence gathering and analysis processes pertinent to homeland security.
  • outline basic intelligence policies and functions of the US government branches.
  • articulate the meaning of current legislation defining intelligence agency responsibilities.
  • enumerate specific methods and techniques for obtaining, synthesizing, and analyzing intelligence.
  • evaluate intelligence using critical judgment and evidentiary analysis.
  • implement basic intelligence gathering techniques and analysis.
  • forecast terrorist activities using various forms of intelligence.
  • describe the foundation and goals for security.
  • identify, describe, and analyze threats to national and international safety and security.
  • apply ethical and professional principles to intelligence gathering and operations.

HLS 304 Transportation and Border Security

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges, as well as presenting different methods to address these challenges. Topics include: security for transportation infrastructure related to seaports, ships, aircraft, airports, trains, train stations, trucks, highways, bridges, rail lines, pipelines, and bus systems. Emphasis is placed on technological solutions employed to enhance security of borders and transportation systems.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • outline the primary federal, state, and local agencies in the United States that are affiliated with border and transportation security and the ethical parameters in which they operate.
  • construct a global historical time-line reflecting significant transportation related terrorist threats and events.
  • discuss the modes of transportation and their industries as it may impact security.
  • identify general vulnerabilities and risks in transportation and border security systems.
  • describe the impact of technology on countering threats to transportation systems and border security.
  • discuss differences in dealing with security threats for passengers versus freight/cargo transportation systems and border security.
  • classify roles, functions, and interdependency between local, federal, military, and international law enforcement agencies to foster border security.
  • solve transportation and border security problems as an individual and in a coordinated team setting.
  • conduct accurate data analysis and make logical recommendations.
  • discuss the supply chain logistics and modes of transportation.