History

History (HIST)

HIST 300 History of Western Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 300 & 480: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:Part of C-ID HIST 170

This survey course reviews western civilization from its origins in the Ancient Middle East until the Renaissance. It emphasizes the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces that have served to define western civilization. The focus is on the cultural legacies and contributions of the Ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome, and Medieval Europe to the development of western civilization.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain the development of western civilization prior to the Renaissance.
  • explain why there may be multiple causes of a historical event.
  • identify the major eras and relevant geography of western civilization prior to the Renaissance.
  • identify and evaluate major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in western civilization prior to the Renaissance.
  • identify and evaluate the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in western civilization prior to the Renaissance.
  • make historical generalizations about western civilization prior to the Renaissance based on personal understanding of the historical evidence.
  • identify and describe the cultural legacies and contributions of the Ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome, and Medieval Europe to the development of western civilization.

HIST 302 History of Western Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 302 & 481: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 180; Part of C-ID HIST 170

This course is a survey of western civilization from the Renaissance to the present, emphasizing the interplay of social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual forces in creating and shaping the modern world. The focus is on the process of modernization, stressing the secularization of western society and examining how war and revolution have served to create our world. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 481.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence
  • compare and evaluate various interpretations used by historians to explain the development of western civilization since the Renaissance
  • evaluate multiple causes and analyze why a historical event happened
  • identify the major eras and relevant geography of western civilization since the Renaissance
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in western civilization since the Renaissance
  • evaluate the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in western civilization since the Renaissance
  • draw historical generalizations about western civilization since the Renaissance based on understanding of the historical evidence
  • describe and evaluate the major movements and historical forces that have contributed to the development of western civilization

HIST 305 Women in Western Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of women's contributions to the major ideas, institutions, and events of Western Civilization. It emphasizes women's diversified roles from antiquity to the present. This course focuses on the interaction between men and women within a socially and culturally constructed framework. It also examines the effects of the patriarchal family structure on society and the pervasive impact of patriarchy on all institutions of western culture.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the contributions of women in the evolution of western social, cultural, political, and economic institutions within the context of socially- and culturally-imposed limits inherent in the patriarchal system of domination.
  • analyze and evaluate the impact of western social, religious, economic, political, and cultural institutions on women's lives and experiences.
  • discuss the role of patriarchy, social stratification, and social construction of gender as historically- and socially-constructed systems of male dominance.
  • utilize basic historical and gender-studies concepts and terminology to examine and analyze patriarchy as a system of domination that has defined the nature of gender relations in western society and institutions.
  • evaluate the symbiotic relationship between private property, religious ideology, and the creation of the legal system that legitimized the preservation of male dominance in western society.
  • comprehend how, to this date, gender relations are strongly influenced by a long history of patriarchal institutions and structures.

HIST 307 History of World Civilizations to 1500

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102, and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 150

This course surveys world civilizations from antiquity to the 1500s, with a particular emphasis on the dynamic interaction and comparison of diverse peoples, ethnicities, and cultures. Special attention is given to the social, political, economic, cultural, and religious influences that shaped major world civilizations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain world history to 1500 C.E.
  • analyze multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened.
  • describe the major eras of world history to 1500 C.E.
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in world history to 1500 C.E.
  • assess the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse ethnicities and cultures in world history to 1500 C.E.
  • use historical evidence to formulate historical generalizations about world history to 1500 C.E.
  • identify the relevant geography of world history to 1500 C.E.

HIST 308 History of World Civilizations, 1500 to Present

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 160

This course is a survey of world history from the 16th century to the present, with particular emphasis on the increased integration of peoples and cultures as the result of the continuing process of globalization. The focus is on the revolutionary transformations of human society and human social relations caused by such new ideas as scientific racism, nationalism, imperialism, and constitutional government. It also covers important trends of the past five-hundred years including the increasing prevalence of migration, the changing nature of warfare, the harnessing of fossil fuels, the growing integration of global economies, and the scientific and technological breakthroughs that are continuing to revolutionize humanity's understanding of and relationship with the natural world. Through this focus it is possible to better understand the forces that have shaped world society over the past five-hundred years and that continue to shape the world today. These analyses are set within the context of such historical concepts as cause and effect, multiple causation, multiple frames of reference, and historical interpretation from evidence.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain world history since 1500 C.E.
  • investigate multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened and to discuss past events through multiple frames of reference.
  • describe the major eras and relevant geography of world history since 1500 C.E.
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, cultural, intellectual, and religious developments in world history since 1500 C.E.
  • assess the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in world history since 1500 C.E.
  • use historical evidence to formulate generalizations about world history since 1500 C.E.

HIST 310 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 310 & 483: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130

This course is a survey of United States history from its European, African, and Native American backgrounds to 1865. It examines the origin and development of many of this nation's political, social, economic, and intellectual institutions including their influences upon contemporary American life. It also emphasizes such historical concepts as cause and effect, multiple causation, historical context, and historical interpretation. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 483.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • analyze multiple causes for an historical event, and properly evaluate why that event happened.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain United States history up to the Civil War.
  • identify the major time periods and relevant geography of United States history up to the Civil War.
  • analyze and evaluate the major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in United States history up to the Civil War.
  • analyze and evaluate the experiences and conflicts of diverse groups of people, including “common people,” in United States history up to the Civil War.
  • analyze, describe, and explain the motives, settlement, and organization of European colonies in North America, and the impact on the Native American environment and cultures.
  • trace the development of racial slavery in America, explain the reasons for its institutionalization, and analyze the influence of Africans and African culture on American society and institutions.
  • analyze the events of the American Revolution and the creation of the United States, including state and national Constitutions, and explain the rationale behind these developments.
  • analyze the philosophical, intellectual, and cultural influences on the development of American political and social institutions.

HIST 311 History of the United States

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 311 & 484: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140

This course is a survey of United States History from 1865 to the present. It also analyzes many of America's political, social, economic, and intellectual institutions, including their influences upon contemporary life. This course also examines this nation's increasing involvement in world affairs. These analyses are set within the context of such historical concepts as cause and effect, multiple causation, and historical interpretation.

This course is not open to students who have completed Hist 484.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain United States History since the Civil War.
  • analyze multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened.
  • identify the major time periods and relevant geography of United States history since the Civil War.
  • analyze and evaluate the major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in United States history since the Civil War.
  • analyze and evaluate the experiences and conflicts of diverse groups of people, including “common people,” in United States history since the Civil War.
  • make historical generalizations about United States history since the Civil War based on historical evidence.
  • analyze and evaluate the increasing role of the United States in a global context since the Civil War.

HIST 318 American Intellectual and Cultural History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of major themes and developments in American culture and ideas from the colonial to the contemporary period. Special emphasis is given to religious, scientific, literary, artistic, philosophical, and political thought to explore the sources, expressions, and transformation of cultural and intellectual values in the history of the United States.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • identify and apply various interpretations used by historians to explain intellectual and cultural developments in the history of the United States.
  • analyze the intellectual sources and expressions of core American values such as individualism, liberty, democracy, citizenship, and equality.
  • identify, evaluate, and analyze the contributions of specific individuals to public and private discussions of American values.
  • analyze the impact of religion, politics, science, philosophy, literature, and art on the formation of American cultural and intellectual values.
  • analyze how the definitions of social categories such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class have changed in cultural and intellectual expression through time.
  • evaluate how social categories such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class have influenced the formation of political, economic, cultural, and social ideas in the United States.

HIST 320 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 and ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This course covers U.S. history from the founding of Jamestown in 1607 through the Civil War. This course begins with a brief overview of the Black American's African heritage. It continues with the role played by African-Americans, their relationships to other groups, and their specific contributions in the growth and development of the nation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the early history of the United States from an African American perspective
  • identify the origin and significance of American institutions such as slavery, U.S. Constitution, and role of the Federal Government
  • relate to the African American experience from African origins through the Civil War
  • identify the historical geography of the world and the United States including changes in the environment and migrations of populations to and within the territory of the United States
  • examine the contributions of African Americans to U.S. History
  • debate the effect of slavery, stereotyping, and prejudice on African Americans
  • evaluate African American relationships with other ethnic groups

HIST 321 History of the United States: African-American Emphasis

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This course covers U.S. history from 1865 to present, including coverage of state and local government with an emphasis on the role of African Americans, their relationships to other groups, and their specific contributions in the growth and development of the nation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine U.S. history since the Civil War from an African American perspective
  • evaluate the function and continued development of U.S. institutions
  • assess the contributions of African Americans to U.S. history
  • evaluate African American relationships with other ethnic groups
  • analyze the struggle for civil rights from Reconstruction to the present
  • debate the effect of segregation, stereotyping, and prejudice on African Americans

HIST 323 History of the United States: The American Indian Experience

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of the North American Indian Nations. It covers the effects of European contact, trade, and colonization. Topics include the effects of United States political, economic, and social policies on Indians throughout U.S. history. Also, it emphasizes American Indian people's attempts to protect their sovereignty and revitalize their societies across time.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • identify and discuss various interpretations used by historians to explain the history of the American Indian experiences in the United States.
  • analyze multiple causes for and properly evaluate why specific historical events happened.
  • analyze the economic, political, and social systems of a wide variety of Nations which inhabited the North American continent prior to European Contact.
  • identify major eras of U.S. history.
  • describe and analyze the effect of European colonization and trade upon the original inhabitants of North America.
  • analyze the consequences of European wars in North America.
  • trace the migration of Europeans and Americans across the continent and explain the rationale for and consequences of these movements.
  • evaluate the effect of stereotyping and racism on American Indian Nations during specific periods in U.S. history.
  • analyze the effect of U.S. government policies on American Indians, including American Indian attempts to protect sovereignty and cultural traditions.

HIST 325 History of Asian/Pacific Americans

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D3; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This is a survey lecture course that examines the history of Asian immigrants and Asian Americans in the United States from 1850 to the present. It includes the process of migration and settlement in the United States by people from East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and the Pacific islands. It examines the historical experience of these groups from a social, political, economic, and cultural perspective, with an emphasis on the following themes: work, family, community formation, government policies, race relations, and ethnic identities. It also addresses the contributions of Asian Americans to the multicultural development of contemporary American society, including the interaction of Asian Americans with people of European, African, Hispanic, and Native descent.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, such as causality, chronology, and change over time.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • apply various interpretations used by historians to explain the history of Asian/Pacific Americans.
  • identify the origins and sources of global Asian migration in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including persons from East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and the Pacific islands.
  • explain the historical context of United States government policies toward Asian immigrants, including immigration restrictions and exclusion from citizenship.
  • analyze the historical patterns of gender roles and family formation among Asian Americans.
  • analyze the effect of racial and ethnic prejudice on Asian populations throughout American history, using appropriate terminology.
  • compare and contrast the historical relationships of Asian American to other racial and ethnic groups in American society.
  • analyze the efforts by Asians and Asian Americans to incorporate themselves into the social, political, economic, and cultural structure of the United States.

HIST 327 History of the Chicano/Mexican American

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a study of the relationship between the development of American and Mexican civilization in the Western Hemisphere. This course focuses on the role of the Mexican American experience in the U.S. as it was affected by social, political, and economic events. Emphasis is placed on socio-cultural contributions of Mexican Americans to American institutions. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, as well as distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence
  • describe multiple perspectives about an event in American/Chicano history
  • analyze multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened
  • analyze and evaluate the major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in U.S. history since the Mexican American War
  • analyze and explain the influence of Mexican Americans on U.S. history
  • explain how the history of the U.S. from a Mexican American perspective enhances the overall understanding of U.S. history
  • identify the major historical periods and relevant geography of the U.S. since the Mexican American War
  • describe the complexity of relationships that Mexican Americans have with other ethnic groups within the U.S.

HIST 330 Women in American History

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a "C" or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320, with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F

This course offers a survey of U.S. women's history, including the origin and development of the nation's political, social, economic, and intellectual institutions, from pre-contact indigenous societies to the modern era. The diverse roles and contributions of European American, Native American, African American, Mexican American, and Asian American women are emphasized throughout the course.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • provide multiple causes to explain why a historical event occurred.
  • describe an event or controversy in U.S. women’s history from several historical perspectives including race, ethnicity, or social class.
  • identify the major eras of U.S. women’s history.
  • analyze the contributions of various groups of women to America’s political and economic systems.
  • define racism and sexism.
  • explain how women’s point of view fits into the overall narrative of U.S. History.

HIST 340 History of California through 1879

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a "C" or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320, with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of the early history of California, starting with the original people of California, the discovery and settlement of California by the Spanish, the Mexican period, American conquest and occupation, the Gold Rush, and ending with events through the Constitution of 1879.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use basic historical terminology.
  • identify and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • critically evaluate various historical interpretations and perspectives of early California history.
  • analyze and properly evaluate the multiple causes of an historical event that happened in California.
  • organize California historical events into chronological order and analyze cause-and-effect relationships.
  • analyze and describe the consequences of California's mission, rancho, gold rush, and railroad eras.
  • evaluate the place of California's economy, politics, culture, and controversies within the context of U.S. and world history.
  • evaluate the role of California's geography and climate in shaping human institutions and experiences.

HIST 341 History of California: 1879 to Present

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a "C" or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320, with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of California history from 1879 to the present. Topics include the economic, social, cultural, and political developments, including the impact of the Constitution of 1879, consequences of railroad expansion, and early twentieth-century urbanization. It also includes the impact of the Great Depression and World War II, water projects, protest and reform movements of the 1960s, the rise of conservatism, and recent political trends.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • identify and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • analyze and properly evaluate the multiple causes of an historical event that happened in California.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain the history of California from 1879 to present.
  • identify and evaluate significant political, economic, social, and ethnic developments from this period of California history.
  • analyze California ideas, controversies, and events by placing them into a national and international context.
  • analyze the role of geography and climate in California in shaping human institutions and experiences.
  • evaluate various interpretations and analyses of California history from 1879 to the present.
  • critique political ideas, controversies, and institutions necessary for effective citizenship, especially for residents of California.
  • analyze primary sources from California history, 1879 to present.
  • support analytical conclusions with examples drawn from California history.

HIST 343 The California Mother Lode

  • Units:0.5 - 3
  • Hours:9 - 54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D6

This course is a history of the Mother Lode with emphasis on the Gold Rush Era and its effects on the natural environment, human population of the region, and cultural and economic development of California within an international context. Lecture and guided visitations at selected locations in the Mother Lode region complement the classroom instruction. Each combination of classroom and on-site instruction constitutes one half unit of credit. Field trips are required and field trip expense fees may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use historical terminology related to the California Gold Rush.
  • critically evaluate various historical interpretations and perspectives of the California Gold Rush.
  • analyze and describe the economic, political, and social consequences of the California Gold Rush.
  • describe various gold mining techniques and evaluate the long-term environmental consequences of those techniques.
  • visit a museum, exhibition, or remnant of a Gold Rush town, evaluate the historical interpretations provided, and make recommendations about ways to improve public interpretive materials.
  • organize Gold Rush era events in chronological order and analyze cause-and-effect relationships.
  • identify and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.

HIST 364 Asian Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F

This course covers the history of Asian Civilizations from the emergence of agriculture and complex societies to 1800 C.E, with particular focus on India, China, and Japan. Topics include the rise of complex societies across Asia; the relationship between agrarian civilizations and the herders of Inner Asia; state-building and imperial expansion; the emergence of the major Asian philosophies and religious faiths, including that of Islam; Asian technology and innovation; the Mongol conquests; and the entrance of Europeans into the Asian world beginning in the 15th century.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • explain the complexity of defining Asia as a region and the diversity of climates, peoples, geography, and historical experiences encompassed by the term Asia.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain Asian History to 1800 C.E.
  • investigate multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened and to discuss past events through multiple frames of reference.
  • describe the major eras and relevant geography of Asian History to 1800 C.E.
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, cultural, intellectual, and religious developments in Asian History to 1800 C.E.
  • assess the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in Asian History to 1800 C.E.
  • use historical evidence to formulate generalizations about Asian History to 1800 C.E.

HIST 365 Asian Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4

This course is a survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural transformation of India, China, and Japan since 1800. It emphasizes how these countries responded to the challenges of modernity and western imperialism by embracing new ideas, new approaches to statecraft, and new social and cultural norms. Topics include the emergence of western dominance in Asia, the breakdown of states and empires in conjunction with, and partly as a result of, western imperialism, the development of Asian nationalisms and nationalist movements, and the growth of Japanese imperialism and the effects that this had on the rest of Asia.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • explain the complexity of defining Asia as a region and the diversity of climates, peoples, geography, and historical experiences encompassed by the term Asia.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain Asian History since 1800 C.E.
  • investigate multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened and to discuss past events through multiple frames of reference.
  • identify the relevant geography of Asian History since 1800 C.E.
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, cultural, intellectual, and religious developments in Asian History since 1800 C.E.
  • assess the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in Asian History since 1800 C.E.
  • use historical evidence to formulate generalizations about Asian History since 1800 C.E.
  • analyze the effects of and responses to colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, and modernity in a variety of Asian societies.
  • describe the major eras of Asian History since 1800 C.E.

HIST 367 History of Russia

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of Russian history from 1861 to the present. It examines the major social, political, and economic developments that have shaped Russian society and culture. Special attention is given to Russian culture, politics, and protest during the 19th century, the revolutions of 1917 and the Bolshevik rise to power, the creation and expansion of the Soviet state under Stalin, and the decline and collapse of Soviet power.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence
  • evaluate various interpretations used by historians to explain Russian history
  • evaluate multiple causes and analyze why a historical event happened
  • identify the major eras and relevant geography of Russian history
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in Russian history
  • evaluate the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in Russian history
  • draw historical generalizations about Russian history based on the historical evidence
  • evaluate the major causes and impact of the Revolutions of 1917
  • analyze the major features of the transformation of the Soviet Union under Stalin
  • evaluate Gorbachev’s reforms and the causes of the collapse of the Soviet Union

HIST 373 History of Mexico

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a survey of the history of Mexico from the pre-classical period to the present. It examines the origins and development of Mexico’s political, economic, religious, and intellectual institutions, their influence on Mexican society and culture, and the resultant legacy that is modern Mexico.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • analyze the major time periods and relevant geography of the history of Mexico from its earliest civilizations to the present.
  • prioritize among multiple causes for an historical event and properly evaluate why that event happened.
  • assess and interpret Mexican history and contemporary Mexican issues by analyzing relevant historical evidence in appropriate contexts.
  • construct and support historical narratives about the experiences and conflicts of indigenous, European, African, and multiracial populations in the development of Mexico.
  • critique narratives about the history of Mexico based on appropriate understanding of relevant historical evidence found in primary and secondary source materials.

HIST 374 History of Latin America to 1830

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 4F

This course is a general historical survey of Latin American history from the pre-contact indigenous civilizations to the 19th-century nationalist movements in the region. The focus is on the influence of political, economic, cultural, and demographic factors that shaped Latin America.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • recognize Latin America as a complex region of enormous diversity in climates, peoples, geography, and historical experiences.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain Latin American history to 1830 C.E.
  • investigate multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened.
  • describe the relevant geography of Latin American history to 1830 C.E.
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in Latin American history to 1830.
  • assess the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in Latin American history to 1830.
  • use historical evidence to formulate historical generalizations about Latin American history to 1830.

HIST 375 The History of Modern Latin America and Caribbean

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4

This course offers a general survey of Latin American history from the 19th century to the present, with focus on social, political, economic, and cultural developments. Issues include Latin America and the Caribbean in the global economy, dictators and democracy, African and indigenous cultures, feminism and gender, cultural politics, social movements and revolution, and relations with the United States and the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • correctly use basic historical terminology.
  • distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence.
  • recognize Latin America as a complex region of enormous diversity in climates, peoples, geography, and historical experiences.
  • identify various interpretations used by historians to explain Latin American history since 1830 CE.
  • investigate multiple causes for and properly evaluate why a historical event happened.
  • describe the relevant geography of Latin American history since 1830 CE.
  • evaluate major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in Latin American history since 1830 CE.
  • assess the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in Latin American history since 1830 CE.
  • use historical evidence to formulate historical generalizations about Latin American history since 1830 CE.

HIST 399 Studying in Italy: Italian History and Culture

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area III(b); CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course, offered as a study abroad course in Italy, surveys Italian history to provide a background for exploring and appreciating Italian life and culture. The focus is on examining the historical context of Italian cultural and artistic expression, thereby informing and enriching our understanding and enjoyment of Italian art and culture. In Rome, this course focuses on the ancient and religious sources of Italian culture. In Florence, it explores and examines how human expression in art, literature, and philosophy served to create a new sense of the possible during the Renaissance. This course also studies how culture reflects human values and how those values can be transformed and at times ennobled by creative genius. A portion of this course may be offered in a TBA component of 25-35 hours which may include museum visits, historical monument and building visits, and Italian cultural and historical site visits.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the subject matter and methodology of history
  • understand such historical concepts as cause and effect and multiple causation as a means of developing appropriate historical generalizations
  • explore and analyze the causes and impact of the Italian Renaissance
  • analyze and evaluate the interrelatedness of art, culture, politics, society, economics, and history
  • critically analyze and evaluate primary sources as evidence reflecting Italian culture and history
  • evaluate and analyze historical documents and interpretations
  • evaluate the historical context of the Italian Renaissance and assess various schools of historical interpretation
  • analyze and describe how Renaissance artistic expression relates to Renaissance thought and writings

HIST 480 History of Western Civilization - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 300 & 480: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:Part of C-ID HIST 170

This course is a survey of western civilization from its origins in the Ancient Middle East until the Renaissance. This seminar-style course confronts the major historical issues through class discussion. The class challenges students to interpret the past by critically analyzing both primary sources and relevant works by leading historians. Emphasis is on the social, political, economic, cultural and intellectual forces that have served to shape the modern world. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 300.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence
  • analyze various interpretations used by historians to explain the development of western civilization prior to the Renaissance
  • evaluate multiple causes and analyze why a historical event happened
  • identify the major eras and relevant geography of western civilization prior to the Renaissance
  • analyze major economic, social, political, and cultural developments in western civilization prior to the Renaissance.
  • evaluate the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in western civilization prior to the Renaissance.
  • draw historical generalizations about western civilization prior to the Renaissance based on the historical evidence.
  • evaluate the cultural legacies and contributions of the Ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome and Medieval Europe to the development of western civilization.
  • critically analyze primary sources and use them to support historical interpretations.

HIST 481 History of Western Civilization - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 302 & 481: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D6; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 180; Part of C-ID HIST 170

This course is a survey of western civilization from the Renaissance to the present. This seminar-style course confronts the major historical issues through class discussion. The class challenges students to interpret the past by critically analyzing both primary sources and relevant works by leading historians. Emphasis is on the social, political, economic, cultural and intellectual forces that have served to shape the modern world. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 302.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and correctly use basic historical terminology, and distinguish between primary and secondary sources as historical evidence
  • analyze various interpretations used by historians to explain the development of western civilization since the Renaissance
  • evaluate multiple causes and analyze why a historical event happened
  • identify the major eras and relevant geography of western civilization since the Renaissance
  • evaluate the experiences, conflicts, and connections of diverse groups of people in western civilization since the Renaissance
  • draw historical generalizations about western civilization since the Renaissance based on the historical evidence
  • critically analyze primary sources and use them to support historical interpretations

HIST 483 History of the United States - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 310 & 483: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 130

This course is an in-depth study of American history from the Colonial through the American Civil War eras. This seminar-style honors course utilizes class discussion based on the reading of selected monographs and primary documents. Particular emphasis is placed on the interrelationships of the developing American political, economic, social, and cultural institutions. Critical thinking skills are emphasized in responding to these issues. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 310.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the major time periods, geographical settings, and human experiences of United States history from the colonial period to the Civil War
  • differentiate between primary source material and secondary source material and their uses in historical study
  • investigate and analyze multiple causes of historical events by applying relevant factual details from primary and secondary source materials
  • synthesize multiple interpretations about historical change in the United States from its colonial origins to the Civil War period, with a focus on the diversity of racial, cultural, gender, and class identities that foster multiple interpretations
  • evaluate the varieties of indigenous American historical experience before and after the arrival of European and African settlers in the American continents
  • assess the motives, settlement, and organization of European colonies in North America, and evaluate their impact on existing environments and indigenous cultural practices
  • analyze the development and institutionalization of racial slavery in North America and appraise the influence of African cultures and experiences on the development of American society and institutions, including the impact of racial slavery on family structure and gender roles
  • assess the economic, scientific, technological, and ecological interactions on the human populations of the American continents from before the colonial period to the middle of the nineteenth century
  • analyze the major events and experiences of the revolutionary and early national periods in United States history, including the history and function of the political institutions of the United States, the creation of state and national constitutions, and the participation of individuals from multiple racial, gender, cultural, and social backgrounds in these events
  • formulate independent historical interpretations by applying valid and relevant factual information from source material
  • integrate knowledge of historical research and interpretation to review critically publications and documents relating to the history of the United States from the colonial period to the Civil War
  • demonstrate an understanding of America's growth in a global context

HIST 484 History of the United States - Honors

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit Limitation: HIST 311 & 484: maximum credit one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(a); CSU Area D6; CSU Area F1; IGETC Area 4F
  • C-ID:C-ID HIST 140

This course is an introduction to the study of American history from 1865 to the present day. This seminar-style honors course utilizes class discussion based on the reading of selected monographs and primary documents. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interrelationships of American political, economic, social, and cultural developments. Critical thinking skills are emphasized in responding to these issues. This course is not open to students who have completed HIST 311.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discern and explain the implications of the interrelationships of major social, ethnic, cultural, political, and economic institutions
  • analyze specific historic events and major historic trends by recognizing and evaluating options, making distinctions, recognizing implications, and applying prevailing data
  • examine the basic elements of historical research and scholarship: evidence, historiography, and critical reviews of existing books and articles
  • construct historical analysis from a combination of theory and applied knowledge
  • differentiate between primary source material and secondary source material and their uses in historical study
  • synthesize multiple interpretations about historical change in the United States from the Civil War through the modern Civil Rights era with a focus on the diversity of racial, cultural, and class identities that foster multiple interpretations
  • integrate knowledge of historical research and interpretation to review important publications and documents relating to the history of the United States from the Civil War to the present

HIST 494 Topics in History

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:HIST 302
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)

This course provides the opportunity for concentrated study on specialized topics in History. It covers topics from a wide range of academic disciplines including anthropology, economics, engineering, fine arts, history, law, life science, literature, mathematics, philosophy, political science, sociology, psychology and varies in content and scope with the interests and expertise of both the instructors and the students. This course may be taken four times on different topics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe how history is broad, multi-faceted, controversial, relevant for all disciplines, and is not necessarily restricted to the one discipline commonly referred to as "history"
  • examine the discipline of history itself - its subject matter and methodology
  • employ such historical concepts as cause and effect and multiple causation as a means of developing appropriate historical generalizations
  • identify and critically analyze the interrelatedness of art, culture, politics, society, economics and history
  • critically analyze and critique primary sources as evidence reflecting a culture and an era
  • write essays and other writings that responds to, evaluates, and analyzes historical documents and interpretations
  • assess various schools of historical interpretation

HIST 495 Independent Studies in History

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in the subject of history, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.