English

English - Creative Writing (ENGCW)

ENGCW 400 Creative Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 200

This introductory creative writing course provides writing experience with three or four of the following genres: short story, poetry, creative nonfiction, and script writing for theater or film. It includes analysis of literary models, faculty and class critiques of work, and discussion of literary techniques such as metaphor, imagery, dialogue, and narrative, in each covered genre.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose manuscripts in at least three of these four genres: poetry, short fiction, creative nonfiction, and script writing for theater or film.
  • analyze works of creative literature.
  • investigate sources of publication, including the Internet.

ENGCW 410 Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGCW 400 with a grade of "C" or better; and ENGWR 300 (College Composition) or ENGWR 480 (Honors College Composition)
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This creative writing course concentrates on fiction writing, including the analysis of fiction written during the semester. Topics include the examination of literary styles in traditional and contemporary fiction as well as revising and editing processes. A portfolio of original work and a conference with the instructor are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose short stories or novel chapters
  • evaluate fiction using literary standards
  • interpret and analyze published stories
  • revise original fiction
  • investigate sources of publication
  • create a portfolio of original short fiction

ENGCW 420 Poetry Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This creative writing course focuses on poetry, offering students the opportunity to develop a personal voice while also developing the skills to analyze and appreciate contemporary poetry. Students examine literary styles and elements in traditional and contemporary poetry, practice revision, and offer constructive critiques.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose poems using a variety of techniques
  • analyze and evaluate published poetry for elements and meaning
  • evaluate peers' writing using workshop principles
  • revise poems to develop purpose and style
  • investigate sources of publication, including traditional and new media

ENGCW 421 A Short Course in Poetry Writing

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGCW 400
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This creative writing course is an abbreviated version of the three-unit Poetry Writing Workshop, ENGCW 420, focusing on the writing of several poems. It examines literary styles in traditional and contemporary poetry and demonstrates revising and editing processes.




Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose formal and free verse poems.
  • evaluate narrative and lyrical elements of poems.
  • analyze themes in poems.
  • revise poems for style and content.

ENGCW 430 Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)

This creative writing course concentrates on the literary essay and explores the factual and experiential sources of creative non-fiction. It covers the writing of various kinds of essays, such as memoir, autobiography, personal essays, reflective nature writing, prose with poetic elements (prose-poetry), and fact-based or philosophical writing with a definite literary, stylistic component. Course readings include one full-length work of creative non-fiction. Topics in this course also include analysis of classical and modern essays for elements such as voice, point of view, and structure.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use methods for exploring various sources of factual and personal writing
  • analyze published works for factual content, structure, voice, and literary style
  • compose creative non-fiction essays according to the ethical principles of the genre
  • critique unpublished writing in a workshop setting
  • revise creative nonfiction writing
  • devise prompts for heuristic writing exercises leading to the development and revision of drafts

ENGCW 441 Feature Film Screenwriting Workshop I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better; or placement into ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGCW 400, ENGWR 300, or ENGWR 480
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course introduces the writing of feature-length film scripts. It requires three proposals for projects, one of which is developed through the first act in official screen format, plus scene descriptions for major scenes, character sketches, and plot outlines. Several classic feature films and/or scripts are analyzed for their writing strengths.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • outline a three-act feature film plot.
  • create film characters.
  • compose visual description.
  • formulate film dialogue.
  • draft scripts in the industry-standard "speculation" format.
  • evaluate professional scripts and peer writing.
  • construct scenes, sequences, and a first act of a feature length script.

ENGCW 450 College Literary Magazine

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ENGCW 400, ENGCW 410, ENGCW 420, ENGCW 430, ENGWR 300, or ENGWR 480
  • Transferable:CSU

This course provides instruction and editorial staff experience in producing a literary and fine arts magazine. Editorial staff collaborate with art selection or design staff in Art New Media to prepare ARC's college magazine, the American River Review, for national competitions sponsored by organizations such as the Columbia Scholastic Press Association and the Associated Collegiate Press. The course focuses on the selection and editing of literary content, and on the publicity, marketing, fund-raising, and distribution of a magazine. It may be taken four times for credit.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create and develop competitive literary standards for the American River Review
  • evaluate and analyze submissions for publication in the American River Review
  • compose publicity and other business communication for the magazine's purposes
  • recommend revisions to authors seeking publication in the magazine and awards in contests
  • manage data and e-mail for the magazine's purposes
  • collaborate effectively with editorial and design teams to compete in national magazine contests
  • prepare literary manuscripts for national competitions

ENGCW 455 College Literary Publishing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ENGCW 450 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGCW 400, ENGCW 410, ENGCW 430, ENGLT 300, ENGLT 321, ENGLT 341, ENGWR 300, ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303, ENGWR 480, or ENGWR 481
  • Transferable:CSU

This course provides instruction and editorial staff experience in the selection of literary works of high artistic merit for publication by Ad Lumen Press, American River College's professional literary press. It focuses on evaluating and selecting literary works submitted for publication by the public, making of editorial recommendations to the Ad Lumen Press Editorial Board, communicating in a professional manner with the public, and providing publicity for the press.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop competitive literary standards for Ad Lumen Press
  • evaluate and analyze submissions for publication by Ad Lumen Press
  • recommend submissions to the Ad Lumen Press Editorial Board
  • manage data and correspondence with internal and external entities for purposes related to the business of Ad Lumen Press
  • collaborate effectively with editorial staff and the Ad Lumen Press Editorial Board
  • prepare literary manuscripts for national competitions

ENGCW 495 Independent Studies in English - Creative Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


English - Education (ENGED)

ENGED 305 Structure of English

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)

This course is a study of the structure of English grammar, both descriptive and prescriptive. It includes the study and practice of traditional grammar and standard usage, with emphasis on the relationship to writing (2000 word writing requirement) and the teaching of language arts; it also includes an introduction to the history of the English language as it relates to irregularities in modern English. This course is designed for those who plan to teach or who are especially interested in grammar as it relates to writing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the effectiveness of commonly used semantic, morphological, and syntactic definitions of parts of speech
  • identify the various grammatical structures used in English, such as phrases, clause types, and sentence types
  • create examples of the various grammatical structures used in English, such as phrases, clause types, and sentence types
  • explain grammatical structures, sentences types, and movement tests used in traditional English grammar
  • distinguish between standard and nonstandard usage as applied to writing and correct common writing errors in English grammar, punctuation, orthography, usage, and convention
  • apply the principles of traditional English grammar to writing and writing instruction
  • design an audience-appropriate grammar lesson plan

ENGED 320 Service Learning: Tutoring Elementary Students in Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students are required to show proof of TB clearance and, if required by the school district, complete a fingerprint clearance through the cooperating school district before they can attend the school site for field work.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312; OR ESLR 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)

This course covers basic methods of tutoring elementary school children reading below grade level. The class meets on campus for the first part of the semester for tutor training. Students are then placed at a nearby elementary school for in-depth practice tutoring elementary children in reading. This course offers field experience for teacher preparation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate elementary students' reading and comprehension skills using a variety of assessment techniques
  • develop appropriate strategies to motivate students, modify behavior, and enhance reading skills
  • design lesson plans incorporating activities for the improvement of fluency and reading comprehension
  • critique children's literature for its quality and reading level appropriateness
  • demonstrate interpersonal communicative skills with diverse student populations

ENGED 324 Introduction to Elementary Teaching with Field Experience

  • Same As:ECE 350
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Before students can attend the school site for field work, they are required to show proof of TB clearance. They may also need to complete a fingerprint clearance through the cooperating school district, if the district requires it.
  • Advisory:ECE 312 or PSYC 372
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID EDUC 200

This course introduces the concepts and issues related to teaching diverse learners in today's contemporary schools, kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12). Topics include teaching as a profession and career, historical and philosophical foundations of the American education system, contemporary educational issues, California's content standards and frameworks, and teacher performance standards. In addition to class time, this course requires a minimum of 45 hours of structured fieldwork in public school elementary classrooms that represent California's diverse student population, and includes cooperation with campus-approved certificated classroom teachers.

This course is not open to students who have completed ECE 350.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify academic requirements and experiences needed to become a credentialed elementary school teacher
  • evaluate attitudes, actions, behaviors, and responsibilities that define the role of a professional educator in a public school setting
  • demonstrate objective, descriptive, and interpretative observation skills
  • analyze learning theory through planning, teaching, and interaction with elementary students
  • examine and assess issues concerning diversity in elementary student backgrounds, interests, experiences, and abilities
  • identify school and community resources that address issues concerning diversity
  • develop a personal preliminary philosophy of teaching, examining personal characteristics, assumptions and beliefs, and experiences which could affect development as a teacher
  • apply course content to classrooms through structured assignments, observations, and reflections

ENGED 495 Independent Studies in English - Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


English - Laboratory (ENGLB)

English - Literature (ENGLT)

ENGLT 300 Introduction to Fiction

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course covers the study of fiction as a type of literature. It typically examines at least twenty short stories and at least three novels, critically analyzing plot, setting, character, theme, and style. This course includes fiction written in English, as well as fiction in translation.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish fiction as a specialized literary genre.
  • discover and analyze literary devices used in works of fiction.
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of short stories and novels.
  • analyze works of fiction as a reflection of the authors' cultures and values.
  • compose essays and other writings that analyze, interpret, and evaluate fiction.

ENGLT 304 Introduction to Poetry

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course introduces the art of poetry. It includes the analysis and appreciation of poetry as a type of literature with careful attention to the elements of poetics, the various styles of poetry, and major poets and poetic movements. Poetic theories and poems by a wide variety of traditional and contemporary poets as well poetic theory are examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish poetry as a specialized literary genre.
  • identify poetic devices and effectively integrate a discussion of those devices into analysis of poetry.
  • analyze poetic movements and forms of poetry while investigating specific works and writers.
  • compose essays and other writings that analyze, evaluate, and respond to poetry.
  • analyze poetry as a reflection of poets’ cultures and values.

ENGLT 308 The Graphic Novel and Manga

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course critically examines graphic novels and manga. It explores the social, cultural, and historical contexts reflected in these mixed-media genres, analyzing thematic, character, and structural development and exploring the relationship of image and text in this development. This course typically includes at least five full-length works as well as numerous background readings.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between comics, graphic novels, and manga
  • differentiate between icons, symbols, and metaphors
  • evaluate the qualities of icons and analyze how those qualities affect the text and story
  • evaluate graphic novels and manga for elements of narrative structure
  • evaluate the page layout and panel transitions
  • analyze the relationship of images to text
  • compose essays and other written responses that analyze and evaluate graphic novels and manga

ENGLT 310 English Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 301, 303, or 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 160

This course surveys representative works in English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. It traces the development of medieval, Renaissance, and Restoration prose, poetry, and drama, introducing methods of literary analysis and research. Historical movements and the cultural contexts of particular works and authors are also covered. Whenever possible, works are read in their entirety.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them effectively to literary works.
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of early English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century.
  • compose essays that respond to, analyze, and evaluate literary works.
  • analyze early English poetry, prose, fiction, and drama as a reflection of the authors' cultures and values.

ENGLT 311 English Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 301 or 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 165

This course is a survey of representative works in English literature from the late eighteenth century through the present, covering the Romantic, Victorian, modernist, and postmodern periods. Prose, poetry, and drama are represented, and whenever possible, works are read in their entirety.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them effectively to literary works.
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of English literature from the late 18th century to the present.
  • compose essays that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • analyze English poetry, prose, fiction, and drama of the late 18th century through the present as reflections of the authors' culture and values.

ENGLT 320 American Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 301, 303, or 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 130

This course surveys representative texts in American literature from the precolonial period to the Civil War and introduces students to a literary tradition born from many languages and ethnicities. Considering a variety of contexts, it examines writing as a device to reflect and create a rapidly changing world marked by political revolution, expanding commerce, and the rise of print culture. Readings--from a variety of fictional and nonfictional texts--and discussion highlight the multicultural nature of American literature and society. Whenever possible, texts are read in their entirety.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose appropriate academic discourse, using the conventions of critical literary analysis.
  • analyze and interpret themes found in the literature and intellectual movements of the period, using a variety of rhetorical strategies and modes of literary criticism.
  • relate specific literary works to their historical, philosophical, social, political, regional, or aesthetic contexts.
  • integrate research, evidence, and independent and collaborative thought into writing and critical thinking.

ENGLT 321 American Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 301 or 303
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 135

This course surveys representative American literature from the post-Civil War period until the present, with consideration of important aspects of American literary history. Readings--from a variety of stories, novels, plays, and poetry--and discussion highlight the multicultural nature of American literature and society.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them effectively to literary analysis.
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of America's literature while investigating specific works and writers.
  • compose focused analyses and arguments showing insights into themes explored and arguments made by American authors, using various rhetorical strategies and modes of literary criticism.
  • relate the literary works to their historical, philosophical, social, political, regional, and/or aesthetic contexts.
  • integrate research, evidence, and independent and collaborative thought into writing and critical thinking.

ENGLT 327 Literature of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303, or ENGWR 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course examines the literature of California in the context of its ethnic, social, political, geographical, and intellectual history. It covers a wide range of multi-ethnic, multicultural, and cross-cultural literature (fiction, non-fiction, poetry, memoirs, essays, and films), such as Native American legends, early California exploration accounts, prose and poetry from the California heartland, and Hollywood crime fiction, with emphasis on what makes the California experience unique.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them correctly to literary analysis.
  • analyze the larger patterns, the multi-ethnic and multicultural contrasts and conflicts, and the historical continuity of California's literature while investigating specific works and writers.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • analyze California literature as a reflection of the authors’ cultures and values.

ENGLT 335 Latino, Mexican-American, and Chicano Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course explores literature (poetry, short stories, novels, creative nonfiction, and performance) authored by Latino writers. It typically examines the following themes: resistance, survival, identity, homeland, immigration, the border, socio-political activism, gender, and sexuality. All or most of each text is in English. Knowledge of the Spanish language is helpful but not required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • appraise influences from other arts to literary production by Latinos.
  • research complexity of identity (including multiethnic, multiracial, and multinational aspects) depicted in literary works by Latinos.
  • compare and contrast literary devices used in literary works by Latinos.
  • build upon knowledge of the forms and themes of literature by Latinos.
  • evaluate and critique literature by Latinos and make connection to an author’s geographic region and socio-historical context.

ENGLT 338 Native American Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303, or ENGWR 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course examines a range of Native American perspectives as expressed through autobiography, fiction, poetry, and drama. Emphasis is placed on Native authorship. The literature highlights the survival strategies of indigenous cultures in the face of historical and present day colonization. This course examines how Native literature is a reflection of the social and cultural movements that have shaped, been shaped by, and interacted with the Native community. Included are samples of Native literary voices from North, South, and Central America. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the major themes in the Native American experience
  • evaluate personal values and ideas relative to a text
  • analyze major literary elements and employ a variety of critical approaches
  • apply critical theory about race, ethnicity, and ethnocentrism to a text
  • judge a text's level of authenticity as a Native work of literature
  • compare literary texts
  • compose essays and other writing that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary texts
  • identify important cultural themes in a work of literature

ENGLT 340 World Literature I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 301 or 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 140

This course surveys world literature in translation from antiquity through the early seventeenth century. In addition to significant works in the western tradition, masterpieces of non-western literature are studied. Ancient world cultures and historical movements are introduced, along with methods of literary analysis and research. The entire range of genres is represented and, whenever possible, works are read in their entirety.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them effectively to literary analysis
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of early world literature while investigating specific works and writers
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works
  • analyze early world poetry, prose, fiction, and drama as a reflection of the authors' cultures and values

ENGLT 341 World Literature II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 301 or 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 145

This course surveys world literature in translation from the late seventeenth century to the present. In addition to significant works in the Western tradition, masterpieces of non-Western literature from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Central and South America are studied. The entire range of genres is represented, and, whenever possible, works are read in their entirety.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them correctly to literary analysis.
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of later world literature while investigating specific works and writers.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • assess later world poetry, prose, fiction, and drama as a reflection of the authors' cultures and values.

ENGLT 345 Mythologies of the World

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course of mythic literature introduces characters and themes in stories from world literature: creation stories, heroic journeys, and moments of transcendent transformation. It explores the timeless metaphors of these stories, metaphors which continue to not only influence characters and stories in modern literature, but also captivate contemporary readers.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between characteristics of oral and written traditions.
  • evaluate traditional and contemporary texts for the functions of myth.
  • analyze traditional and contemporary texts for mythic archetypes.
  • evaluate a literary text for the elements of the hero's journey.
  • analyze the transformation of hero and society.
  • examine liminal events and situations, assessing the effect of these events and situations.
  • compose essays and other written responses that evaluate and analyze mythic texts.

ENGLT 360 Women in Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course examines women as both creators of and characters in literature. It includes reading and analyzing literature from a broad range of periods, genres, and cultures. Works by both men and women are included, with emphasis on works written by women and the social and cultural contexts that produced those works.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify literary devices and apply them effectively to literary analysis.
  • analyze the larger patterns and historical continuity of literature by or about women while investigating specific works and writers.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • assess literature by or about women as a reflection of the authors' cultures and values.

ENGLT 365 Introduction to Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303, or ENGWR 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; CSU Area D4; IGETC Area 3B; IGETC Area 4D

This course surveys representative literature concerning gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (GLBTQ) themes and issues as written by or about GLBTQ people from throughout its literary history to the present day. The comprehensive literary study includes analysis of significant historical and cultural influences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a basic knowledge of GLBTQ literature and the cultural and intellectual trends it represents.
  • recognize the contributions of GLBTQ writers to mainstream literature and the GLBTQ subculture.
  • identify and explain GLBTQ issues at work in literature over the course of several historical periods.
  • discuss the significance of GLBTQ writers and topics within a historical framework.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • assess literature by or about GLBTQ people as a reflection of the authors' cultures and values.

ENGLT 370 Children and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2

This course is a survey of high-quality literature, past and present, created for children, and of the criteria for selecting, evaluating, and discussing children's literature. It includes discussion of the history of children's literature and current issues such as censorship, literacy, multiculturalism, and diversity. This course is intended for prospective teachers, early childhood education (ECE) majors, librarians, parents, those interested in writing or publishing children's books, and those who enjoy children's literature. It includes reading to children in a formal group setting.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the genres of children's literature.
  • analyze and apply theories and criteria for selecting and evaluating children's literature.
  • describe and interpret the contributions of outstanding authors, illustrators, and critics of children's literature.
  • interpret and apply the theories and practices of oral reading and storytelling.
  • develop ideas and practical activities for helping children to experience, appreciate, and respond to literature.
  • examine literature portraying diverse and multicultural perspectives.

ENGLT 378 Young Adult Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course presents an overview of young adult literature and is designed to incorporate the ever-changing nature of this genre. The literature addressed reflects themes of interest to young people. Topics include a review of the history of young adult literature, readings of contemporary award-winning young adult literature, as well as a look at some of the classics from the past. Authors may include Suzanne Collins, Orson Scott Card, Markus Zusak, Yann Martel, Alexandre Dumas, J. K. Rowling, Sandra Cisneros, Lois Lowry, John Knowles, and J. D. Salinger. Censorship concerns and culturally diverse selections also form a core part of the course. This course includes an analysis of literary elements, an examination of an author's style and content, and reflection on what makes a piece of literature a classic.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply criteria for evaluating young adult literature
  • analyze the contributions of outstanding authors and critiques of young adult literature
  • identify the significant literary elements and an author's style for a given text
  • analyze and explain the influence of society on young adult literature
  • compose analytical expository essays and other writing about young adult literature

ENGLT 380 Introduction to Shakespeare

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303, or ENGWR 481
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course provides an introduction to Shakespeare's works. Six to ten plays, representing the range of Shakespeare's achievement, are covered. Topics include strategies for reading Shakespeare's English, exploration of dramatic genres, and contemporary approaches to interpreting the plays. Field trips to live Shakespearean performances may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the significance of Shakespeare's literary achievement
  • analyze the language of Shakespeare's plays
  • evaluate the contemporary relevance of Shakespeare's plays
  • compose analytical and interpretive essays about particular Shakespearean plays
  • synthesize multiple interpretations of Shakespeare
  • analyze and compare dramatic genres

ENGLT 382 Introduction to Dramatic Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course introduces drama as a type of literature. Plays from various historical periods and cultures are covered, with an emphasis on the analysis of plot, characterization, setting, theme, and other literary elements of drama. Attendance at a live theater production may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify elements of literature as they apply to the study of drama.
  • apply literary evaluation criteria to different plays.
  • analyze the cultures that produced particular plays.
  • examine and evaluate dramatic styles and their place in literature.
  • assess the contemporary importance of particular plays.
  • compose arguments about the interpretation of particular plays.

ENGLT 392 Science Fiction and Fantasy

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course explores the literature of science fiction and fantasy. It includes an exploration of the roots of these genres—the fantastic, the Gothic, terror and horror—and the development of their diverse contemporary forms. Texts may include selections from television, film, anime, short stories, and novels.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the use of Gothic characteristics in various texts.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze critically the literary elements of a text.
  • examine the social, cultural, historical, or political contexts that might have influenced a text.
  • distinguish and assess the role of the Other.
  • analyze literary works by applying various critical approaches.
  • differentiate among individual subgenres, such as classic fantasy, sword and sorcery, terror, horror, space opera, and cyber punk.

ENGLT 403 Film Adaptations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 300 or ENGWR 480, AND ENGWR 301, ENGWR 303 or ENGWR 481.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course examines the processes, problems, and successes of adapting literary, stage, and previous film material into films. It discusses faithful and unfaithful adaptations through reading the original texts and viewing the adapted films with an awareness of their historical and cultural contexts. This course analyzes intention, creative distinctions, and the limits and strengths of each medium.


Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply basic terminology from narrative theory, literary studies, and film studies.
  • distinguish between the strengths and weaknesses inherent in the genres of short story, novel, drama, and film.
  • analyze differences among genres and media.
  • construct criteria for judging strengths and weaknesses of adaptations.
  • evaluate films based on course concepts, such as narrative modes, genre conventions, and production exigencies.
  • evaluate both literature and film in cultural context, as cultural and artistic expressions in their historical and social moments.
  • compare and contrast the works studied.

ENGLT 494 Topics in Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2

This is a literature course to be scheduled as needed under a title describing specific content. It provides the opportunity to focus on an in-depth study of specific literary subjects or genres. The course offers an extensive study of works by significant writers of literature defined by theme, region, vocation, or human experiences. Possible titles include Retelling Stories or Literature of War.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine and compare works studied according to theme, author's style, or genre.
  • compose essays and other writings that respond to, evaluate, and analyze literary works.
  • analyze the use and effect of literary devices in a variety of works.
  • assess poetry, prose, fiction, or drama as a reflection of the authors' culture and values.

ENGLT 495 Independent Studies in Literature

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


English - Reading (ENGRD)

ENGRD 12 Reading Center: Individualized Support Skills for ENGRD 14

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ENGRD 14.

This course offers supplemental instruction in basic reading skills for those concurrently enrolled in ENGRD 14. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define an unfamiliar word using a variety of techniques
  • identify stated main idea in a paragraph
  • formulate the unstated main idea of a paragraph
  • identify the stated thesis in an essay
  • formulate the unstated main idea of an essay
  • identify the supporting ideas in an essay

ENGRD 14 Reading Skills

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement through the assessment process.

This course covers the foundations of reading skills, such as vocabulary development and basic reading comprehension.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • comprehend unfamiliar words in basic level texts using word attack skills, syllabication, context clues, and the dictionary
  • apply study strategies including notetaking, annotating, and time management appropriately to promote academic success
  • identify stated and implied main ideas and supporting details in fiction and nonfiction basic-level texts
  • recognize paragraph patterns in nonfiction basic-level texts

ENGRD 15 Basic Reading Skills

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 14 with a "C" or better, or 1.5 units of ENGRD 54 with a "P" AND ENGRD 55 with a "P," or placement through the assessment process.

This course provides instruction in techniques for improving basic skills in reading. It involves intensive work with word attack, literal comprehension, vocabulary and study skills, including practice with multicultural reading materials and strategies. Individual work in ENGRD 50, Reading Center: Individualized Support Skills for ENGRD 15, may be required by instructor. This course is not open to students who have completed ENGRD 56 or ENGWR 56 with a grade of "C" or better.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply a variety of vocabulary techniques, including structural analysis, dictionary skills, and context clues to derive the definition of an unfamiliar word
  • identify stated main ideas in paragraphs
  • recognize supporting details in paragraphs
  • distinguish inferred meanings and draw appropriate conclusions in textbooks, periodicals, and various appropriate-level materials
  • apply comprehension and study techniques such as Study, Question, Read, Recite, Review (SQ3R), highlighting, annotating, and others
  • adjust techniques dependent upon the purpose for reading
  • use time management and test taking skills
  • analyze the five elements of fiction: characters, plot, theme, setting, and conflict
  • differentiate text structures in paragraphs, such as example, comparison/contrast, cause and effect, sequence, definition, or classification at the appropriate reading level
  • identify a stated thesis in a multi-paragraph selection
  • formulate implied main ideas from major supporting details

ENGRD 17 Vocabulary and Spelling with Study Strategies

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.

This course emphasizes the improvement of vocabulary and spelling with the use of learning and study strategies. Individual learning styles are utilized to learn new words in a number of contexts. Thematic readings, writing, and individual word journals are required throughout the course to supplement and reinforce spelling rules and the use of new vocabulary.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop personal study strategies to fit individual learning styles.
  • practice pronouncing words correctly to avoid spelling errors.
  • use the dictionary to find word meanings, pronunciations, and parts of speech.
  • use a word correctly in a sentence by knowing the word's part of speech.
  • use words in a sentence around an unfamiliar word to determine that word's meaning.

ENGRD 50 Reading Center: Individualized Support Skills for ENGRD 15

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ENGRD 15.

This course offers supplemental practice in beginning reading skills for those concurrently enrolled in ENGRD 15. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • locate a stated thesis in an expository or persuasive essay
  • formulate an unstated thesis in an expository or persuasive essay
  • identify the major details that support a thesis
  • apply inferential comprehension techniques to paragraphs and expository or persuasive essays

ENGRD 54 Succeeding in College Reading

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ENGRD 310 (Critical Reading as Critical Thinking) or ENGRD 312 (Academic Textbook Reading); AND ENGRD 314 (Speed Reading)

This course offers small- and large-group instruction on reading processes, reading strategies, and critical thinking skills necessary for success in college reading. Assignments are connected to students' ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 coursework. Pre-reading, reading, and post-reading processes are covered. This is a corequisite course for students who are concurrently enrolled in ENGRD 310 or 312 and ENGRD 314. Pass/No pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the reading process, which includes pre-reading, reading, and post-reading to a variety of reading tasks.
  • identify the stated or implied thesis, primary and secondary supports, and patterns of organization of a variety of readings.
  • apply effective and efficient study reading strategies for college-level material, such as annotating, outlining, mapping, and summary writing.
  • analyze words contextually and structurally.

ENGRD 55 Reading Center: Individualized Reading Skills II

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:ESLR 50 with a "C" or better for non-native speakers.

This course offers individualized instruction focused on discrete reading comprehension skills and application of those skills to persuasive and expository essays, textbooks, and fiction. Subjects include SQ3R (Study, Question, Read, Recite, and Review), patterns of development, and inferential comprehension. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply comprehension and study techniques such as Study, Question, Read, Recite, Review (SQ3R)
  • analyze five elements of fiction: character, plot, theme, setting, and conflict
  • differentiate text structures, such as comparison and contrast, cause and effect, example, sequence, definition, or classification in paragraphs and essays
  • formulate implied main ideas from major supporting details

ENGRD 56 Integrated Reading, Writing and Study Skills

  • Same As:ENGWR 56
  • Units:6
  • Hours:108 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 14 (Reading Skills) with a grade of "C" or better; or 1.5 units of ENGRD 54 with a grade of "P" AND ENGRD 55 with a grade of "P"; or placement through the assessment process
  • Advisory:CISC 100 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent skill level.

This course emphasizes the interrelationships among reading, writing, and study skills at the basic skills level. Course content, activities, and assignments integrate all three areas, providing opportunities to improve reading and writing skills in a student-centered environment. This course provides students with ongoing practice with the reading and writing processes and covers strategies for reading and writing in response to a variety of texts. Additional topics include a review of campus services and programs and effective study strategies. This is a learning community course taught by one reading and one writing instructor. Completing this course is equivalent to completing both ENGRD 15 and ENGWR 50. This course is not open to students who have already completed ENGRD 15, ENGWR 50, ENGWR 51, or ENGWR 56 with a grade of "C" or better.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the writing and reading processes in completing writing and reading assignments.
  • apply a variety of idea-generating tools, such as previewing, brain-storming, and clustering, appropriate to specific reading and writing tasks.
  • assess the key ideas of texts by different authors on related topics.

  • assess and differentiate among main ideas, stated or implied; supporting details; and patterns of organization in paragraphs and essays.
  • evaluate the different points of view of a variety of texts and distinguish the key points in the texts by using appropriate annotating and note-taking skills.

  • analyze the meanings of words by applying a variety of vocabulary evaluation techniques, such as structural analysis, dictionary skills, and context clues.
  • compose well-organized essays supported by specifics/details from assigned texts.
  • organize paragraphs and essays to support a point of view in ways appropriate to the topic.
  • compose clear, effective, and grammatically correct sentences in a variety of structures.

  • format essays according to MLA guidelines.
  • identify and employ appropriate and expected college-student behaviors.
  • evaluate various learning styles and apply them to individual study habits.
  • describe campus programs and student services and assess their relevance to student success.
  • describe the types of and ways to receive counseling at American River College.
  • apply time management strategies to develop an effective study schedule.

ENGRD 111 Reading Across the Disciplines: Academic and Professional Development

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Enrollment in a below transfer-level course.

This course offers reading skills development for students below transfer-level as applied to various content-area courses. Topics include the following: strategies for textbook comprehension, note-taking, annotating, mastering disciplined-base vocabulary, paraphrasing, reading graphics, and test-taking strategies. Students must come to the R.A.D. Center and meet with a R.A.D. staff member before enrolling. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze lectures, readings, and handouts to meet course requirements.
  • synthesize material from lectures and reading assignments to create appropriate study tools.
  • identify the purpose for reading.
  • assess the reading process and material for appropriate strategies.
  • utilize discipline-based vocabulary.

ENGRD 116 Proficient Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 15, ENGRD 56, or ENGWR 56 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in ENGWR 101.

This course analyzes expository and argumentative essays, textbooks, and literature in preparation for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 and other transfer-level classes across the disciplines. It emphasizes recognition of an author's thesis, supporting details, point of view, purpose, and tone through an in-depth analysis of an essay's structure. This course also focuses on applying study strategies for comprehending and retaining information from textbooks in preparation for tests. Individual work in the Writing Across the Curriculum Program, the Reading Across the Disciplines Program, or the Reading Center may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze words contextually and structurally
  • apply the reading process such as SQ3R, PRO, and BWA to textbook selections
  • apply appropriate annotations, notetaking, and mnemonic techniques
  • analyze the structure of expository or argumentative essays
  • identify an essay's stated or implied thesis, primary and secondary supports, and pattern of organization
  • critically analyze an author's purpose, tone, bias, and point of view
  • distinguish fact from opinion and claim from premise in an argumentative essay
  • analyze literature or narrative non-fiction to identify elements of fiction such as setting, plot, characters, conflict, and theme
  • infer authors' tone by identifying connotation, denotation, and figurative language

ENGRD 117 Reading Center: Individualized Support Skills for ENGRD 116

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ENGRD 116.

This course offers instruction in intermediate reading skills. It provides supplementary practice to students who are concurrently enrolled in ENGRD 116. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish author's tone using inferential comprehension techniques
  • differentiate organizational patterns in expository or persuasive essays
  • apply note-taking strategies to textbook selections
  • implement inferential comprehension techniques in expository and persuasive college-level selections

ENGRD 310 Critical Reading as Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 116 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGRD 314
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in ENGWR 300.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3

This course covers the theory and practice of critical and speed reading skills needed for successful academic performance with an emphasis on the following: (1) critical and analytical evaluation of college-level expository and argumentative essays, (2) development of flexible reading rate and speed, (3) critical analysis and evaluation of independent research, (4) vocabulary development, and (5) application of these skills to multicultural essays, journals, fiction, and nonfiction reading.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify thesis statements, stated or implied in college-level essays and articles.
  • analyze content to determine major details and patterns of development.
  • assess critical comprehension elements in written arguments: inference, fact and opinion, judgment, tone, bias, style, and purpose.
  • evaluate the logic of arguments in college-level texts, focusing on propaganda, assumptions, faulty analogies, non-sequiturs, and deductive and inductive patterns.
  • evaluate the quality and sufficiency of evidence and other forms of support for a written argument.
  • create effective and efficient study reading strategies for college-level material such as annotating, outlining, mapping, and summary.
  • assess reading strategies appropriate to regulate reading rate depending on reader's purpose and varied college-level materials.

ENGRD 312 Academic Textbook Reading

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 116 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Corequisite:ENGRD 314
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in ENGWR 300
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b)

This course concentrates on the refinement of the ability to read, understand, and respond to transfer-level textbooks across the curriculum. Emphasis is on critical and analytical reading, thinking and writing; graphics and other visual materials; discipline-based vocabulary; and reading rates as they relate to academic success.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • choose appropriate study skills for various content area courses including previewing, annotating, paraphrasing, and reviewing.
  • evaluate purpose and structure in college-level textbooks with specific applications related to careers and disciplines.
  • compose written responses to textbook readings.
  • employ college-level, discipline-based vocabulary.
  • analyze and apply appropriate reading rates to college-level material.

ENGRD 314 Reading Across the Disciplines: Speed Reading

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ENGRD 310 or 312
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers reading skills to transfer-level students as applied to various content-area courses. Topics include the following: assessing the reading process and material to employ appropriate strategies to meet the purpose for reading; utilize ones reading rates and style based on purpose and material; utilize college-level, discipline-based vocabulary; and master the skills needed to critically read and analyze future transfer level courses and texts. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the reading process and material for appropriate strategies.
  • identify the purpose for reading.
  • adapt reading rate and style based on purpose and material.
  • utilize college-level, discipline-based vocabulary.
  • analyze college-level texts, essays, journals, and research material.

ENGRD 315 Reading Across the Disciplines for Content Courses

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:9 - 18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Another transfer-level content-area course
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers reading skills to students as they apply to various content-area courses. Topics include the principles of the reading process, analysis of discipline-specific reading assignments, strategies for retention, and research strategies particular to the chosen discipline. Students should contact the RAD center before enrolling. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze lectures, readings, assignments, and handouts to meet course requirements.
  • synthesize materials from lectures and reading assignments to create appropriate study tools.
  • assess the reading process and materials to employ appropriate critical reading strategies.
  • identify the purpose for reading.
  • choose reading rate and style based on purpose and material.
  • utilize college-level, discipline-based vocabulary.
  • develop and employ reading strategies for research.

ENGRD 316 Reading Across the Disciplines for Content Courses II

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 315
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers individualized or small-group sessions to help students who have already completed ENGRD 315 improve classroom performance. It focuses on application of inferential and critical reading strategies and study skills to specific content classes and programs. Topics include learning style assessment, how to implement appropriate reading strategies, and how to choose the best study methods. Students must come to the RAD Center and meet with a RAD staff member before enrolling. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • connect learning styles to reading strategies.
  • analyze content-course material to determine the best reading strategies to use to study and retain the information in that material.
  • evaluate the usefulness of different active reading strategies and apply the appropriate strategy to the assigned task.
  • assess performance on content-course exams in order to modify study strategies.

ENGRD 495 Independent Studies in English - Reading

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in Reading, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in Reading and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


English - Writing (ENGWR)

ENGWR 50 Developmental Composition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ENGWR 95 or ENGWR 96.
  • Advisory:BUSTEC 300.1

This course focuses on developmental writing skills, emphasizing the connection between writing and reading with the goal of building fluency. It includes writing in response to assigned readings as well as practicing the writing process: prewriting, thesis development and organization of ideas, drafting of essays, and revision.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose summaries of assigned texts.
  • distinguish between fact and opinion.
  • respond to issues raised in texts.
  • analyze assignments and create strategies for addressing them.
  • organize ideas to improve focus.
  • compose short essays with controlling ideas and support.
  • demonstrate document formatting/setup.
  • revise essay drafts.
  • compose complete sentences with a variety of patterns.

ENGWR 51 Developmental Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 43, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in ENGRD 15

This course focuses on basic writing skills, emphasizing the connection between writing and reading. It includes writing in response to short reading selections. In addition, the writing process and development of specific skills within the sentence, paragraph, and essay forms are covered in preparation for ENGWR 102 or ENGWR 103. A minimum of 3000 words of full-process writing is required. This course is not open to students who have completed ENGWR 56 or ENGRD 56 with a grade of “C” or better.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • summarize main ideas in an assigned reading
  • distinguish between fact and opinion
  • compose a variety of paragraphs with clear controlling ideas and support
  • analyze assignments and create strategies for addressing them
  • compose a clear and organized short essay
  • construct a variety of sentences that demonstrate conventions of standard written English

ENGWR 56 Integrated Reading, Writing and Study Skills

  • Same As:ENGRD 56
  • Units:6
  • Hours:108 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGRD 14 (Reading Skills) with a grade of "C" or better; or 1.5 units of ENGRD 54 with a grade of "P" AND ENGRD 55 with a grade of "P"; or placement through the assessment process
  • Advisory:CISC 100 with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent skill level.

This course emphasizes the interrelationships among reading, writing, and study skills at the basic skills level. Course content, activities, and assignments integrate all three areas, providing opportunities to improve reading and writing skills in a student-centered environment. This course provides students with ongoing practice with the reading and writing processes and covers strategies for reading and writing in response to a variety of texts. Additional topics include a review of campus services and programs and effective study strategies. This is a learning community course taught by one reading and one writing instructor. Completing this course is equivalent to completing both ENGRD 15 and ENGWR 50. This course is not open to students who have already completed ENGRD 15, ENGWR 50, ENGWR 51, or ENGRD 56 with a grade of "C" or better.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the writing and reading processes in completing writing and reading assignments.
  • apply a variety of idea-generating tools, such as previewing, brain-storming, and clustering, appropriate to specific reading and writing tasks.
  • assess the key ideas of texts by different authors on related topics.

  • assess and differentiate among main ideas, stated or implied; supporting details; and patterns of organization in paragraphs and essays.
  • evaluate the different points of view of a variety of texts and distinguish the key points in the texts by using appropriate annotating and note-taking skills.

  • analyze the meanings of words by applying a variety of vocabulary evaluation techniques, such as structural analysis, dictionary skills, and context clues.
  • compose well-organized essays supported by specifics/details from assigned texts.
  • organize paragraphs and essays to support a point of view in ways appropriate to the topic.
  • compose clear, effective, and grammatically correct sentences in a variety of structures.

  • format essays according to MLA guidelines.
  • identify and employ appropriate and expected college-student behaviors.
  • evaluate various learning styles and apply them to individual study habits.
  • describe campus programs and student services and assess their relevance to student success.
  • describe the types of and ways to receive counseling at American River College.
  • apply time management strategies to develop an effective study schedule.

ENGWR 94 Succeeding in College Composition

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ENGWR 300; AND ENGWR 95 or ENGWR 96; AND ENGRD 111.

This course offers small- and large-group instruction on writing processes, writing strategies, and critical thinking skills necessary for success in ENGWR 300 (College Composition). Assignments are connected to the students’ ENGWR 300 coursework. It covers drafting, revision, and editing processes. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply a recursive writing process that includes pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing.
  • summarize, analyze, and respond to readings.
  • analyze and use researched sources in one's own writing.

ENGWR 95 Beginning Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BUSTEC 300.1 or CISC 300

This course offers both individualized and group instruction in appropriate writing processes and strategies for a variety of basic written assignments in all academic disciplines. Topics include understanding writing assignments, strategies for revision, and proofreading. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate proficiency in the beginning writing skills studied
  • compose and revise basic writing
  • apply basic writing strategies to a variety of assignments

ENGWR 96 Intermediate Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BUSTEC 300.1 or CISC 300

This course offers both individualized and group instruction in appropriate writing processes and strategies for a variety of college-level writing assignments in all academic disciplines. Topics include understanding writing assignments, strategies for revision, and basic documentation. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate proficiency in the college-level writing skills studied
  • compose and revise college-level writing
  • apply appropriate writing strategies to a variety of assignments

ENGWR 101 College Writing

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 50 or 51 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.

This course focuses on the connections between critical thinking, writing, and reading that are necessary for the independent development of essays in ENGWR 300 and other transfer-level courses. It emphasizes writing in response to various reading selections, including at least one full-length work. The essay writing process includes prewriting, thesis development and organization of ideas, drafting of essays, and revision. The course also requires outside research and includes an introduction to basic formatting and referencing of sources using MLA-style documentation. Written final drafts totaling at least 4,500 words are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze issues and ideas raised in a variety of texts
  • distinguish among fact, inference and opinion
  • respond to issues raised in texts
  • compose essays with clear controlling ideas
  • compose essays with a logical progression and organization of ideas
  • develop and expand ideas that are supported by a variety of relevant details
  • format documents properly
  • parenthetically reference sources used in paper
  • cite sources in a properly formatted works-cited page
  • evaluate source credibility
  • integrate credible sources using appropriate formatting standards
  • revise essay drafts to improve focus and strengthen ideas
  • construct sentences that demonstrate control of grammar, sentence variety, word choice, and conventions of standard written English

ENGWR 300 College Composition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 101 or 102 with a grade of "C" or better, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Advisory:Concurrent enrollment in ENGRD 310 or 312.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100

This course emphasizes writing and includes reading, research, and critical thinking skills essential for successful completion of a college degree. It covers writing assignments, including expository and argumentative essays (6,000 words minimum for course) using MLA documentation and format. It also includes reading assignments selected from a variety of transfer-level texts of substantial length. This course is not open to students who have successfully completed ENGWR 480.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess complex texts for audience, purpose, tone, and development.
  • evaluate arguments for logical consistencies and fallacies.
  • synthesize concepts and evidence from complex texts and sources.
  • compose effective transfer-level essays.
  • incorporate a variety of rhetorical strategies.
  • integrate credible sources using appropriate citation and formatting standards.
  • construct grammatically correct sentences employing a variety of structures and transfer-level diction.

ENGWR 301 College Composition and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 120

This course offers study of literary texts, with emphasis on analytical reading and writing. It covers principles of argument and analysis, such as reasoning inductively and deductively. Assigned texts include novels, short stories, poems, plays or films, and literary criticism. Essays written for the course (6,000 words minimum) generalize from the texts to present carefully reasoned arguments. At least one essay includes citations from secondary sources, documented according to current MLA format. Not open to students who have successfully completed ENGWR 481.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the cultural and historical contexts of literary works
  • reason inductively from examples, patterns, and structures to form generalizations
  • reason deductively by drawing conclusions about literary works
  • compose a thesis-driven argument of interpretation or evaluation and support it with textual evidence, using a sufficient variety and number of appropriate examples
  • compare opposing interpretations by literary scholars

ENGWR 302 Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGRD 310 or 312
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105

This course develops analytical skills through writing and discussion. It examines methods by which people are persuaded to think, believe, and act. It also includes analyses of arguments or expressions of opinions for their validity and soundness. Assigned readings include a variety of essays and a book-length text. Finally, this course focuses on critically assessing, developing, and effectively expressing and supporting opinions. Essays written for the course (6,000 words minimum) draw from the texts to present carefully reasoned arguments. At least one essay includes citations from secondary sources, documented according to current MLA format. This course is not open to students who have successfully completed ENGWR 482.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze, compare, and evaluate divergent perspectives
  • evaluate complex systems of values, contexts, and assumptions in texts
  • compose thesis-driven arguments of interpretation or evaluation and support them with textual evidence, using a sufficient variety and number of appropriate examples
  • assemble, synthesize, and evaluate online and library research for use in a written argument
  • compose rhetorically sophisticated sentences to help achieve their purposes in writing

ENGWR 303 Argumentative Writing and Critical Thinking Through Literature

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 300 or 480 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105; C-ID ENGL 110; C-ID ENGL 120

Through the study of complex literary works in all major genres, this course offers instruction in analytical, critical, and argumentative writing; critical thinking; research strategies; information literacy; and proper documentation. Close reading skills and the aesthetic qualities of literature are also studied. A minimum of 6000 words of formal writing is required. Attendance at readings, plays, and/or films may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and compare the social, historical, cultural, psychological, or aesthetic assumptions of complex literary texts
  • analyze formal and informal fallacies in literary analysis
  • analyze and employ inductive and deductive reasoning and argumentative appeals using logos, ethos, and pathos
  • analyze and interpret literary texts by identifying key elements of major genres
  • analyze and interpret specific literary texts, defining and applying common literary devices
  • synthesize appropriate textual evidence and examples, demonstrating appropriate academic discourse and the conventions of literary analysis
  • synthesize primary and secondary sources into written work without plagiarism, demonstrating appropriate documentation format
  • compose thesis-driven arguments to suit a variety of rhetorical situations, including interpretation, evaluation, and analysis
  • compose essays in a style and tone appropriate to the academic community that are generally free of sentence errors of grammar, usage, and punctuation
  • analyze complex literary texts, applying skills such as note-taking, annotating, and paraphrasing
  • apply strategies to self-assess learning and comprehension

ENGWR 304 Advanced Writing in the Disciplines (WID)

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:9 - 18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers small and large group instruction on the writing processes and writing strategies necessary to compose academic essays and reports that follow the guidelines and requirements of a specific discipline. Additionally, approaches to composing longer, more complex writing tasks following a discipline's style are taught. Topics vary according to need and may include the principles of the writing process, analysis of discipline-specific writing assignments, strategies for revision, and research and documentation skills such as APA or MLA. In order to take this course, students must be enrolled in at least one other transfer-level course. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply discipline-specific writing strategies for transfer-level writing assignments
  • demonstrate proficiency in the discipline-specific writing skills studied
  • compose and revise written transfer-level assignments following the academic style required for a specific discipline

ENGWR 306 Advanced Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers individualized and small-group instruction focused on helping students from all academic disciplines apply appropriate writing processes and use transfer-level writing strategies required for academic composition. Topics vary according to need and may include the principles of the writing process, analysis of writing assignments, strategies for revision, and research and documentation skills. In order to take this course, students must be enrolled in at least one other transfer-level course. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply writing strategies for a variety of written assignments
  • demonstrate proficiency in the advanced writing skills studied
  • compose and revise written transfer-level assignments

ENGWR 360 Writing in the Disciplines: Composing Essays in History

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:9 - 18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers small and large group instruction on the writing processes and writing strategies necessary to compose academic essays and reports that follow the guidelines and requirements of the History discipline. Additionally, approaches to composing longer, more complex writing tasks following this discipline's style are covered. Topics include the principles of the writing process, analysis of discipline-specific writing assignments, strategies for revision, and research and documentation skills such as Chicago or MLA style. In order to take this course, students must be concurrently enrolled in at least one transfer-level History course. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply discipline-specific writing strategies for transfer-level History assignments
  • demonstrate proficiency in the discipline-specific writing skills studied
  • compose and revise written transfer-level assignments following the academic style required for the History discipline

ENGWR 361 Writing in the Disciplines: Composing Essays in the Social Sciences

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:9 - 18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers small and large group instruction on the writing processes and writing strategies necessary to compose academic essays and reports that follow the guidelines and requirements of the courses in the social science disciplines. Additionally, approaches to composing longer, more complex writing tasks following the styles of one or more disciplines in this area are covered. Topics include the principles of the writing process, analysis of discipline-specific writing assignments, strategies for revision, and research and documentation skills such as APA or Chicago style. In order to take this course, students must be concurrently enrolled in at least one transfer-level social science course, such as Psychology or Sociology. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply discipline-specific writing strategies for transfer-level assignments in social science courses
  • demonstrate proficiency in the discipline-specific writing skills studied
  • compose and revise written transfer-level assignments following the academic style required for the social science discipline studied

ENGWR 362 Writing in the Disciplines: Composing Essays in English

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:9 - 18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course offers instruction on the writing processes and writing strategies necessary to compose academic essays. It includes an examination of the rationale for using a process-based approach to writing as well as specific writing strategies for prewriting, conducting and using research, drafting, revising, editing, and composing metacognitive reflections.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply a variety of writing strategies for different aspects of the writing process
  • demonstrate understanding of the writing strategies studied
  • compose metacognitive reflections about writing that demonstrate awareness of the importance of the process and strategies taught
  • compose and revise written transfer-level assignments

ENGWR 480 Honors College Composition

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into the course through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(a); CSU Area A2; IGETC Area 1A
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 100

This honors composition course requires the analysis of professional essays and at least one full-length volume of non-fiction that exhibits complexity in both subject and structure. It emphasizes the composition of carefully reasoned, stylistically sophisticated essays of varying lengths and in varying rhetorical modes, at least one of which includes research and appropriate MLA documentation. Essays written in this course will total at least 6,500 words. The course also emphasizes presentation of independent and collaborative research. This course is not open to students who have successfully completed ENGWR 300.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze essays, articles, and books that are complex in both subject and structure
  • evaluate one full-length volume of non-fiction for style, tone, and content
  • compose carefully reasoned essays, using various rhetorical strategies
  • conduct research to gather information
  • apply complex critical thinking skills by defining issues; gathering, analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing ideas; and developing conclusions
  • evaluate sources for credibility
  • collaborate in presenting responses, analyses, and evaluations of reading and writing assignments
  • organize and present individual project results

ENGWR 481 Honors College Composition and Literature

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 480 with a grade of "C" or better; OR ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better AND placement into ENGWR 480.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 120

This course is an advanced seminar in critical reading and writing about literature. Through complex, in-depth reading assignments, it examines the four major genres--the novel, the short story, poetry, and drama--in works by authors representing diverse perspectives and cultures. It covers inductive and deductive reasoning about literature and the written analysis of literature, requiring at least 6,500 words of formal, analytical writing. This course also examines literary theory and research, the use of primary and secondary sources, and MLA documentation. This course is not open to students who have successfully completed ENGWR 301.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the cultural, historical, biographical, ethnic, and philosophical contexts of literary works
  • assess a variety of perspectives about literary works
  • examine a wide range of literary conventions
  • reason inductively from examples, patterns, themes, and structures to form generalizations about literary works
  • reason deductively by drawing conclusions about the meaning of literary works
  • compose interpretations of diverse literary works
  • analyze works of literary criticism and theory

ENGWR 482 Honors Advanced Composition and Critical Thinking

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ENGWR 480 (Honors College Composition) with a grade of "C" or better; OR ENGWR 300 with a grade of "C" or better AND placement into ENGWR 480.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area II(b); CSU Area A3; IGETC Area 1B
  • C-ID:C-ID ENGL 105

This is an honors course in critical reasoning, reading, and writing, requiring a high level of competence in English composition. Complex texts—essay and book-length works—reflecting a variety of social, cultural, and historical contexts are read, discussed, and analyzed. Although this course focuses primarily on non-fictional texts, selected works of fiction may be included. This course focuses on the writing of formal academic essays which include primary and secondary research; MLA format is required for all essays, and a minimum of 6500 words is required for the course. Group and individual class presentations are required; at least one essay assignment requires independent reading. This course is not open to students who have successfully completed ENGWR 302.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the social, cultural, and historical contexts of various texts
  • compose summaries of various texts
  • evaluate texts for logical and emotional content
  • evaluate content information for accuracy and credibility
  • compose essays that integrate a variety of texts which reflect differing points of view
  • compose essays that effectively address audience expectations
  • reason inductively from examples, patterns, themes, and structures to form generalizations
  • reason deductively by drawing conclusions about the meaning of specific details, words, or phrases
  • demonstrate familiarity with a variety of schools of critical and rhetorical theory
  • demonstrate appropriate documentation of sources
  • demonstrate a sophisticated and effective style and vocabulary

ENGWR 495 Independent Studies in English - Writing

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.