Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education (ECE)

ECE 294 Topics in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides opportunity to study current topics in early childhood education which are either not included in current offerings, or require emphasis beyond that offered in existing courses.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Examine current topics in Early Childhood Education
  • Illustrate best practices with young children based on child development theories and research
  • Generalize different levels of professionalism

ECE 295 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

ECE 300 Introduction to Principles and Practices in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to early childhood education, including an overview of the history of the field, evolution of professional practices and ethics, educational principles that support child development from birth through the school-age years, and teaching practices based on observation, documentation, and interpretation of children’s behavior. Site visits may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • relate current perspectives on childhood, the care of children, and early childhood education to historical and cultural contexts.
  • identify career paths, certification options, professional associations, and dispositions for working within the early childhood field.
  • discriminate among philosophies of early childhood education in regards to assumptions about how young children learn and how early childhood teachers should teach.
  • describe principles and practices that guide teaching when working with young children, to include the development of play-based learning environments, routines that involve children in applying emerging skills, and strategies that support young children’s social competence.
  • identify the role of observation, documentation, and interpretation of children’s play as a tool for planning curriculum for young children and assessing their learning.

ECE 305 Introduction to Family Child Care

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an orientation to family child care. It includes state and local regulations, issues of health and safety, curriculum, behavior guidance, and business management of child care programs operating in the provider's home.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the components of a successful licensed family child care home appropriate for all children.
  • develop criteria for implementing developmentally appropriate practices.
  • describe the role and responsibilities of a family child care provider.
  • interpret and reference the legal regulations of family child care homes (Title 22).
  • identify effective communications systems with diverse families.

ECE 312 Child Development

  • Same As:PSYC 372
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of “C” or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of “C” or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (UC credit limitation: PSYC 372, 373, and ECE 312 combined: maximum credit, one course )
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D9; CSU Area E1; IGETC Area 4I
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a study of the growth and development of children from the prenatal stage through adolescence. For each stage of development, the physical, cognitive, linguistic, social-moral, and emotional aspects of development, with attention to both typical as well as atypical development in each area, are discussed. Included are the influences of culture, family, and the interaction of maturational and environmental factors. This material is designed as a foundation for early care and education, teaching, and parenting. This course is not open to students who have completed PSYC 372.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify typical and atypical developmental stages and characteristics of children from birth through adolescence
  • describe current and prominent theories of child development
  • apply theories to teaching and child-rearing practices
  • identify typical behavior of children and the individual differences and special needs (physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development)
  • analyze the influence of culture, family, society, and environment and the roles they play in the child's development

ECE 314 The Child, the Family and the Community

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D7; IGETC Area 4G
  • C-ID:C-ID CDEV 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the child's development within the family and the community. It focuses on socialization methods, parenting style, and the impact of family, culture, school, community, and the media on the child's development. This course offers the opportunity to research and review the diverse community resources available to support the child and the family.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and evaluate changing family structures and roles in relation to social, cultural, and economic influences.
  • describe and compare the influence of diverse cultures on the socialization of children.
  • critically analyze the impact of stress factors on the child within culture and society.
  • examine theories of socialization that address the interrelation of the child, family, and community, with specific reference to Urie Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory.
  • examine the impact of socialization, family history, and life experiences, on one's own developmental outcomes, and assess how this impacts relationships with children and families.
  • critically review public policy related to the well-being of children and families.
  • identify the roles, functions, and services offered to the child and family by community resources, including resources for children with special needs.

ECE 316 Mass Media and Young Children

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the impact of mass media on socializing young children with emphasis on the influence of mass media on development, including the impact of television, movies, commercial advertising, books, and popular music. It also includes strategies for minimizing the negative influences of mass media on children.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe how media affect children's overall development, attitudes, and behavior
  • analyze a wide range of media for messages about race, gender, class, and violence
  • identify the political and economic forces that shape and control the media
  • utilize effective strategies and resources for combatting the negative effects of media on young children
  • employ a variety of developmentally appropriate media literacy activities for young children
  • identify approaches and resources for activism and advocacy around media issues

ECE 320 Curriculum and Interactions in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 AND ECE 312 or PSYC 372 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must show proof of negative tuberculosis as well as immunizations for influenza, pertussis, and measles prior to participating in the lab.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 101; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides supervised experience working with children in an early childhood setting. Topics include principles of curriculum development, classroom design, and child guidance, with opportunity to apply these key teaching principles in practical situations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply developmentally appropriate principles and practices to support young children’s optimal development and learning within healthy, safe, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments.
  • assess one’s own teaching with respect to the teacher’s role in providing best and promising practices in early childhood education.
  • design, develop, and evaluate play-based learning environments for young children, routines that involve young children in applying emerging ideas and skills, and developmentally appropriate and inclusive learning activities for young children.
  • plan, implement, and evaluate experiences that support young children in building a foundation for language and literacy, math and science, social sciences, and the arts.
  • plan for children's learning using observation, documentation, and interpretation of their actions, ideas, and feelings.
  • develop respectful and reciprocal relationships with families, with particular attention paid to those whose children have special needs, and supporting families whose home language is other than English.
  • demonstrate communication and guidance strategies that support the development of young children’s social competence.
  • analyze possibilities for children’s learning within play-based curriculum that support children’s cognitive, language, creative, physical, and social/emotional development.

ECE 321 Advanced Practicum in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:4
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Current Tuberculosis clearance.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 210
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This advanced course provides supervised experience as a teacher in an early childhood education program. It is aimed at leadership in the areas of developing environments for learning, child observation and assessment, documentation of children's work, behavior guidance, group management, collaborative teaching, building relationships with families, and effective preparation and implementation of curriculum.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create a statement of philosophy and a list of guiding principles and practices for early childhood teaching, using current research and theory in child development.
  • design, arrange, observe, and evaluate a complete classroom environment wherein children construct knowledge within a context of play.
  • plan, implement, observe, and evaluate the overall and ongoing curriculum and learning encounters, verifying opportunities to apply emerging skills in the areas of language and literacy; math and science; the arts; physical development; and social sciences.
  • demonstrate the use of observation, documentation, and interpretation for curriculum planning, assessment of children’s learning, and advocacy in regards to making visible children’s learning.
  • organize communication systems within a classroom that involve families in the process of curriculum and program design.
  • support the development of a climate of care and respect among children, teachers, and families by applying strategies for negotiating disputes, fostering caring relations, and sharing responsibility.
  • assess one's own teaching experiences to guide practice.

ECE 325 Positive Guidance Strategies with Young Children

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces strategies that teachers and parents can use to help young children develop social and emotional skills. It examines theories, research, and practical applications for teachers in early childhood classrooms and parents at home. Developmental stages of children's behavior, positive discipline techniques, and promotion of social-emotional skills are also covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine child development theories and research in regard to positive guidance strategies.
  • summarize key practices from dominant guidance theories.
  • analyze early childhood care and education physical environments, schedules, materials, activities, and practices for the effects on children's behavior.
  • assess children's behavior and apply effective guidance practices in daily interactions.
  • identify teaching and parenting practices that foster social-emotional skills.
  • identify factors which have both positive and negative impacts on brain development and how these variables influence the development of executive functioning.

ECE 326 Making Learning Visible Through Observation and Documentation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Corequisite:ECE 312
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 101; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course links critical and reflective thinking to observation and assessment of young children’s development. It prepares teachers of young children to use observation, documentation, and interpretation strategies to improve program quality in early childhood settings. Multiple forms of child assessment and early childhood program assessment are explored. Site visits may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare the purpose, value, and use of formal and informal assessments, including ethical and legal concerns.
  • evaluate the strengths and limitations of common assessment tools with respect to children’s diverse cultures, home languages, and developmental capabilities.
  • recommend changes to play environments, guidance strategies, curriculum activities, and care routines based on systematically recorded observational data that documents children's actions, ideas, and feelings.
  • demonstrate children's developmental progress using observational documentation of children's ideas and behavior.
  • analyze the effectiveness of photo documentation in conveying how young children learn within quality early childhood settings.
  • integrate observed documentation of children's ideas, feelings, and actions to engage children's families and others as active partners in developing early childhood curriculum and programs.

ECE 330 Infant and Toddler Development

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a study of infants and toddlers from pre-conception to age three including physical, cognitive, language, social, and emotional growth and development. It applies theoretical frameworks to interpret behavior and interactions between heredity and environment. Additionally, it emphasizes the role of family and relationships in development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate biological and environmental factors that influence pre-conception and prenatal health, development, and early parenting.
  • outline the major developmental milestones, characteristics, and growth patterns of children from conception through 36 months.
  • demonstrate developmentally appropriate observation skills in the areas of physical, social, emotional, and/or cognitive development of infants and toddlers.
  • analyze the multiple contextual influences on infant and toddler development, including the influence of culture, diverse family practices, and interrelationships between heredity and environment.
  • use current research to explain a variety of developmental issues in the first three years including the impact of birth practices on the newborn and family.
  • relate developmental theory to infant and toddler development, interactions, and relationships.
  • compare and contrast caregiving practices and environments that support optimal development.

ECE 331 Care and Education of Infants and Toddlers

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course applies current theory and research to the care and education of infants and toddlers in group settings. It examines essential policies, principles, and practices that lead to quality care and developmentally appropriate curriculum for children birth to 36 months.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • summarize the essential policies and practices of quality infant and toddler programs, including primary caregiving, quality indicators, and practices that support the unique abilities of children from birth through 36 months of age.
  • demonstrate strategies to promote healthy relationships in the care and education of infants and toddlers, including reciprocal communication techniques and respectful practices with diverse families served.
  • evaluate and design appropriate infant and toddler curriculum and environments based on observation, documentation, and reflection.

ECE 342 Constructive Math and Science in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course is an introduction to the constructivist approach to teaching math and science concepts in early childhood education. The content and teaching techniques support the perspective that children construct knowledge through a dynamic, interactive process that facilitates their development of working theories related to math and science. Topics include an overview of the role of the teacher in developing appropriate experiences for children and a review of current standards and guidelines, including California's Early Learning Foundations and Frameworks.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify inquiry skills and concepts children are building in early childhood and provide meaningful opportunities for children to apply and master these skills and concepts.
  • define and implement effective approaches to teaching and learning science and mathematics in early childhood education.
  • demonstrate teaching techniques that encourage and support children in actively developing understandings of the processes involved in mathematical and scientific knowledge.
  • develop and evaluate important elements of a science-rich and math-rich learning environment.
  • design and evaluate curriculum in math and science using an inquiry-based approach.
  • generalize knowledge of the constructivist/inquiry approach to design curriculum that is culturally respectful and inclusive as well as considerate of children's prior experiences gaining knowledge about the world.
  • analyze mathematic and science curriculum concepts based on the knowledge of relevant research and knowledge of child development.
  • critique the important concepts in children's construction of knowledge in mathematics and science in comparison to product-driven repetition and drill practices.

ECE 343 Language and Literacy Development in Early Childhood

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course prepares early childhood educators and others working with young children to recognize, understand, and enhance the emergent language and literacy experiences and skills of young children. The knowledge of developmentally appropriate language and literacy practices improves early childhood educators' ability to support young children in the early years (birth to five years) to build a strong foundation for learning to read and write in the primary grades. Topics include an overview of the teachers' role in developing appropriate language and literacy experiences for young children, including ways to support the child learning English as a second language.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe developmental patterns in early literacy learning and research-based teaching practices that help children build a foundation for rich vocabularies and language fluency for reading and writing.
  • design and define developmentally appropriate goals and expectations for young children’s achievement in reading and in writing.
  • incorporate developmentally appropriate teaching practices that support children’s language and literacy knowledge from birth through age five.
  • evaluate and define program policies (staff development, curricular resources, and assessment) that support early childhood language and literacy teaching and learning.
  • analyze practices and assess issues that support young children learning a second language while simultaneously maintaining competence in the home language.
  • evaluate and demonstrate strategies of collaboration with children’s families to implement projects that support children’s literacy experiences both at school and at home.

ECE 350 Introduction to Elementary Teaching with Field Experience

  • Same As:ENGED 324
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Before students can attend the school site for field work, they are required to show proof of TB clearance. They may also need to complete a fingerprint clearance through the cooperating school district, if the district requires it.
  • Advisory:ECE 312 or PSYC 372
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)
  • C-ID:C-ID EDUC 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the concepts and issues related to teaching diverse learners in today's contemporary schools, kindergarten through grade 12 (K-12). Topics include teaching as a profession and career, historical and philosophical foundations of the American education system, contemporary educational issues, California's content standards and frameworks, and teacher performance standards. In addition to class time, this course requires a minimum of 45 hours of structured fieldwork in public school elementary classrooms that represent California's diverse student population, and includes cooperation with campus-approved certificated classroom teachers.

This course is not open to students who have completed ENGED 324.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify academic requirements and experiences needed to become a credentialed elementary school teacher
  • evaluate attitudes, actions, behaviors, and responsibilities that define the role of a professional educator in a public school setting
  • demonstrate objective, descriptive, and interpretative observation skills
  • analyze learning theory through planning, teaching, and interaction with elementary students
  • examine and assess issues concerning diversity in elementary student backgrounds, interests, experiences, and abilities
  • identify school and community resources that address issues concerning diversity
  • develop a personal preliminary philosophy of teaching, examining personal characteristics, assumptions and beliefs, and experiences which could affect development as a teacher
  • apply course content to classrooms through structured assignments, observations, and reflections

ECE 356 Programs for the School-Age Child

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; or ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for out-of-school time programs (before-school, after-school, and summer programming) of school-age children (K-8). It emphasizes day-to-day program operation, teaching strategies, developmental levels of the school-age child, and age-appropriate activities. Program visits to observe and evaluate school-age programs in our community may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the developmental milestones of children in grades K-8
  • demonstrate how developmental milestones are characterized within a school-age program setting
  • design, implement, and evaluate high-quality, age-appropriate activities for school-age programs
  • develop schedules and routines for school-age children
  • identify the differences in program models for school-age children
  • differentiate between programs offered to school-age children
  • analyze budget, staffing patterns, staff qualifications, and facility management for use in before-school, after-school, and summer programs
  • evaluate a variety of environments for school-age programs

ECE 358 Activities for the School-Age Child

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on design, implementation, and evaluation of developmentally appropriate activities for the school-age child (K-8). Curriculum areas include games, construction, art, music and movement, science and nature, and drama. It explores other topics including cooperative program planning, environments, guidance techniques, and the importance of positive interpersonal relationships between the adults and the children in the program. This course may require students to conduct observations in a school-age classroom.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recall developmental stages and characteristics of children TK-8, including risk factors or stress related issues school-aged children might face.
  • examine and analyze children's activities, ideas, and interests as sources for developmentally-appropriate curriculum planning.
  • design and evaluate a variety of activities appropriate for school-aged children in group settings including strategies and activities that reduce stress.
  • analyze and apply guidance strategies for school-age children in a group setting.
  • describe strategies for establishing supportive adult-child relationships in the school-age classroom.
  • discuss the role of environment in developmentally appropriate curriculum planning for school-age children.
  • critique school-age child care practices through observation and practical research.

ECE 361 Introducing Young Children to Visual Arts

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course prepares teachers in early childhood education with strategies for introducing young children to the media and tools of drawing, painting, sculpting, and other visual arts commonly used by young children to represent and understand the world around them. The focus is on observing children's natural ways of exploring each medium and learning strategies to facilitate and document children's emerging skills and relationship with each medium. Included are strategies for designing early childhood environments that promote children's exploration of visual arts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and observe the developmental progression of children's exploration and use of the tools and media of drawing, painting, sculpting, and construction.
  • demonstrate the attributes, selection, and use of expressive media and tools commonly used with young children.
  • create interest areas within an early childhood classroom that provide developmentally appropriate media, tools, and settings for young children's independent exploration and use of a variety of expressive media.
  • design encounters with expressive arts media and tools that present challenges and problems appropriate to children's developmental interests and abilities for each phase of development from infancy through eight years of age.
  • evaluate early childhood classroom environments for their capacity to promote young children's comfort and competence in using expressive media to represent impressions, feelings, and experiences.
  • summarize anecdotal observations of children's encounters with the tools and media of expressive art and make visible children's learning through developmental portfolios and displays.
  • design documentation that supports reflective examination among teachers, families, and children of the aesthetic and cognitive dimensions of children's work.

ECE 363 Music and Movement with Young Children

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to theoretical principles and practical applications for integrating appropriate music and movement experiences in early childhood settings. It focuses on using music and movement as strategies for forming a classroom community of learners, and managing behaviors, routines, and transitions. This course also explores incorporating culturally diverse music and movement activities to support children's understanding and acceptance of differences.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe how music and movement supports a young child's growth in all developmental domains.
  • plan, implement, and evaluate music and movement experiences and environments for young children, including children with special needs.
  • use music and movement as a strategy for forming a classroom community of learners, and for managing behaviors, routines, and transitions.
  • create a repertoire of songs, finger plays, rhymes, chants, and movement activities to support children's development.
  • identify strategies for using culturally diverse music and movement experiences to promote understanding and support appreciation of differences.

ECE 404 Children with Special Needs

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 312 or PSYC 372 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the variations in development of children with special needs ages birth through eight and the resulting impact on families. It includes an overview of historical and societal influences, laws relating to children with special needs, and the identification and referral process. Observations in public or private children’s centers, schools, and agencies may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize various exceptionalities and conditions of children and identify interventions based on the developmental continuum.
  • evaluate the role of history and society in shaping current policies related to best practices of inclusion and serving children with special needs.
  • collaborate with families and community members in supporting inclusion of children with special needs.
  • describe the sequence of development and the inter-relationships among developmental areas.
  • identify community resources that meet the needs of children with special needs and their families.
  • explain various strategies that support collaborative practices in promoting the optimal development of children within the context of their families and communities.
  • summarize the steps in the referral process including observation, documentation, screening, and assessment.
  • identify the benefits of using a strength-based approach in working with children with special needs and their families.

ECE 407 Curriculum and Strategies for Children with Special Needs

  • Units:4
  • Hours:54 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ECE 404 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides supervised experience working with young children with special needs in inclusive early care and education settings with an option to work in a non-inclusive classroom (e.g., a diagnostic preschool, preschool communication class, social communication class, or autism special day classroom). This course covers curriculum and intervention strategies for working with children with special needs and partnering with their families as well as the importance of cultural competence. It focuses on the use of observation and assessment in meeting the individualized needs of children and families in inclusive and non-inclusive classrooms. Topics include integration strategies, classroom environments, and individualized instructional strategies for children. This course emphasizes creating modifications, accommodations, and/or adaptations to the environment, routines and curriculum, role of the teacher in partnering with families, and working with interdisciplinary teams.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate program, educational, and professional policies, based on special education laws and evidence-based practices.
  • design and implement curriculum strategies based on children’s individualized needs in inclusive and natural environments.
  • advocate for effective partnerships with families, interdisciplinary team members, and community resource specialist.
  • explain current special education laws and their impact on early childhood practice.
  • describe strategies that support the central role of families and their collaborative partnerships with team members and community professionals.
  • demonstrate knowledge of reflective practice, cultural responsiveness, confidentiality, and professional practices when working with colleagues, children, and families.
  • practice various formal and informal observation and assessment procedures used to guide identification and intervention decisions.
  • identify curriculum, environment, and natural learning opportunities to meet individualized outcomes and goals of young children and families.
  • design modifications and accommodations based on observation, evidence-based practices, and legal requirements to support children’s development.

ECE 414 CPR and Pediatric First Aid

  • Same As:HEED 311
  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:27 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (HEED 310, 311, 316 & ECE 414 combined: maximum credit-1 course )
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course meets the requirements for American Red Cross certification in California Child Care Health & Safety Training which includes adult, child, and infant CPR and pediatric first aid. It also includes legal considerations, avoiding disease transmission, responding to sudden illnesses and injuries, and recognition of common childhood diseases. This course is not open to students who have completed HEED 311.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and implement triage techniques
  • assess the emergency care of life-threatening conditions
  • evaluate and formulate emergency first aid techniques for common childhood injuries and illnesses
  • demonstrate infant, child, and adult CPR skills
  • appraise disease transmission prevention techniques as they relate to CPR and first aid procedures
  • plan and design a functional first aid kit

ECE 415 Children's Health, Safety and Nutrition

  • Same As:NUTRI 320
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 220
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines basic nutrition, health, and safety needs of children from the prenatal period through school age. Topics include introduction to early childhood curriculum, laws, regulations, standards, policies, and procedures related to child health, safety, and nutrition. It emphasizes integrating and maintaining the optimal health, safety, and nutritional concepts in everyday planning and program development for all children, along with the importance of collaboration with families and health professionals. This course is not open to students who have taken NUTRI 320.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the interrelationship between health, safety, and nutrition as it relates to the well-being of children.
  • develop various methods of collaboration with families and teachers that promote the health, safety, and nutrition of children.
  • identify community resources that promote the health, safety, and nutrition of children.
  • evaluate assessment tools and policies that protect the health, safety, and nutrition of children in child care settings.
  • employ safe food handling techniques for preventing food-borne illnesses.
  • assess the general symptoms and management of common infectious diseases that may occur in childhood.
  • identify potential hazards in children's environments and describe how to make them safer.
  • identify nutrient needs during fetal development, infancy, and childhood.
  • identify and explain the major nutrients and their food sources.
  • evaluate a child's nutrient intake by comparing it with current nutrition standards and recommendations.
  • compare nutrition, health, and safety practices from the perspective of culturally diverse communities.

ECE 420 Administration I: Programs in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 300 with a grade of "C" or better; and either ECE 312 or PSYC 372 with grades of "C" or better; Or, BA in Child Development or related field from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • Advisory:ECE 320
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the administration of early childhood programs. It covers program types, budgets, management, regulations, laws, and the development and implementation of policies and procedures. It also examines various administrative tools, philosophies, and techniques needed to open, organize, and operate an early care and education program.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply administration skills in various types of early care and education programs.
  • compare and contrast various program structures, philosophies, and curriculum models.
  • identify strategies to ensure equity and respect for children, families, staff, and colleagues.
  • demonstrate knowledge of strategic and fiscal planning.
  • summarize systems and methods to support sound fiscal operations in a variety of early care and education settings.
  • demonstrate knowledge of compliance with regulatory systems.
  • evaluate components of quality programs, facilities, and operations.
  • assess various methods and tools of evaluation.
  • examine effective policies and procedures for staffing and scheduling.

ECE 422 Administration II: Personnel and Leadership in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 420 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers effective strategies for personnel management and leadership in early care and education settings. It includes legal and ethical responsibilities, supervision techniques, professional development, and reflective practices for a diverse and inclusive early care and education program.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate effective practices for managing and leading staff and administering early care and education programs.
  • implement ongoing professional development plans based on evaluation of staff and administrator needs.
  • establish professional relationships and facilitate collaboration and communication between colleagues, families, and stakeholders.
  • evaluate the factors needed to create a diverse and inclusive environment.
  • identify components of hiring practices, observation, and evaluation practices of staff.
  • describe the legal requirements and responsibilities of administering an early care and education program.
  • formulate strategies for compensation and professional growth opportunities in programs.
  • summarize essential practices for collaboration with staff, families, and community.
  • articulate the importance of professional integrity and confidentiality.

ECE 424 Adult Supervision: Mentoring in a Collaborative Learning Setting

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 314 and 320 with grades of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers principles and methods of supervising student teachers, volunteers, staff, and other adults in early care and education settings. Emphasis is on the roles and development of early childhood professionals as mentors and teachers working collaboratively to guide a teaching team or individual within a classroom setting. This course satisfies the adult supervision requirement for the CA Child Development Master Teacher Permit and Site Supervisor permit issued by the CA Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • individualize mentoring and supervision strategies based on the roles and developmental stages of adult learners, including student teachers.
  • demonstrate competency in communication and reflective practices when working with diverse adult populations.
  • evaluate and use a variety of personnel, program, and environmental assessment tools to inform leadership decisions.
  • identify characteristics of effective leaders and mentors.
  • critique and practice strategies to support adult learners.
  • demonstrate reflective practice, cultural competency, and ethical conduct.

ECE 430 Culture and Diversity in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 101; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI
  • C-ID:C-ID ECE 230
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the development of social identities in diverse societies, including theoretical and practical implications of oppression and privilege as they apply to young children, families, early childhood programs, and teaching practices. Various classroom strategies are explored emphasizing culturally and linguistically appropriate anti-bias approaches supporting all children in becoming competent members of a diverse society. It also includes self-examination and reflection on issues related to social identity, stereotypes and bias, social and educational access, media, and schooling.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critique theories and identify ways in which cultural and family patterns affect children's behavior and identity.
  • analyze various aspects of children's experience as members of families targeted by social bias considering the significant role of education in reinforcing or contradicting such experiences.
  • compose rationale and goals for a multicultural, anti-bias early childhood program.
  • distinguish stereotypic and biased classroom materials and environments.
  • examine how children develop an awareness of differences and how prejudice may be formed in the early years.
  • describe various techniques teachers can use when responding to children's developing discriminatory behaviors.
  • evaluate the impact of personal experiences and social identity on teaching effectiveness.

ECE 432 Leadership in Diversity

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ECE 430 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course expands upon ideas developed in ECE 430. It offers strategies for early childhood teachers and leaders, both novice and experienced, who are starting or deepening their anti-bias approach to leading early childhood programs. Key aspects of the leader's role in building and sustaining anti-bias early childhood education programs are explored, including the development of policies and procedures and practical activities that foster the transformation of early childhood teachers and teaching. It critically discusses ways to create a climate where conflict, risk-taking, discomfort, and differences are positively acknowledged and supported. Additionally, it provides a framework for working with families and supporting family partnership and leadership.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the key aspects of anti-bias early childhood education program leadership, including the phases of adult anti-bias development, key aspects of early childhood education program leadership, and how to maintain a long-term commitment to education for social justice and equity.
  • develop strategies to create and sustain program structures that support anti-bias values, including philosophy statements, admissions priorities, budget allocations, and hiring procedures.
  • create strategies and activities for engaging staff in learning about and starting to implement an anti-bias framework.
  • examine ways to help build anti-bias family and community partnerships, including policies regarding community outreach, intake, orientation, handbooks, daily communication, family visibility, and community connection in the classroom.
  • demonstrate ways to manage and negotiate disequilibrium and conflict, how to respond to resistance, and how to create a climate that supports risk-taking.
  • define strategies for observing, documenting, and assessing anti-bias growth in both teachers and children, including strategies for identifying the indicators of program change.

ECE 455 Environment Rating Scales in Early Childhood Programs

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines Environment Rating Scales (ERS): Infant/Toddler (ITERS), Early Childhood (ECERS), School-Age Care Programs (SACERS), and Family Child Care (FCCERS) as tools for quality improvement in a variety of child development programs. It emphasizes theory and best practices in order to evaluate classrooms, materials, and interactions between adults and children. Site visits will be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the basic quality components, subscales, and items contained within the ERS.
  • administer an ERS by evaluating early childhood classrooms and playgrounds.
  • measure early childhood classrooms and playgrounds using ERS quality scales for a total score, average score, and subscale scores.
  • evaluate strategies while using an ERS to improve efficiency in collecting information and ensure accurate scores.
  • apply observer guidelines to minimize the effect on a classroom while conducting an ERS.
  • compose an action plan to improve quality components of the students' own early childhood classrooms and playgrounds.
  • effectively communicate summary reports and results of ERS evaluations to classroom teachers and administrators.

ECE 495 Independent Studies in Early Childhood Education

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.