Art (ART)

ART 101 Lightroom and Photoshop Basics

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.

This course provides fundamental skills in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop that artists, gallery personnel, photographers, and fashion industry workers need to manage image and video files for print and web purposes. Topics include file import from cameras and devices, file format, file size, and file management. It also covers Photoshop editing of image files, video files, and Photoshop processing workflows. Drawing in Adobe Photoshop using brushes and layers is introduced.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • use Lightroom catalogs to organize and archive files
  • import files from various sources into Lightroom and Photoshop
  • create digital slides of artwork for portfolio and competition purposes
  • manage file formats and sizes for varied imaging purposes
  • perform basic editing for image improvement in Lightroom and Photoshop
  • use Photoshop brushes and other tools to draw for fashion and imaging purposes
  • prepare files for print or web purposes

ART 300 Drawing and Composition I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Drawing Fundamentals
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 110

This course introduces observational drawing and composition. Development of the ability to perceive and define shape, contour, volume, space, and value using a variety of drawing media and subject matter is emphasized. It focuses on the clarity of observational skills and the ability to translate three-dimensional form and space into two-dimensional drawings. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create a portfolio of finished drawings in a variety of drawing media that demonstrates the ability to observe and record the characteristics of simple and complex objects using both line and value.
  • apply principles of design and linear and/or atmospheric perspective to observational drawings.
  • critique artworks using correct terminology related to drawing concepts, materials, and techniques.
  • identify a personal style and begin an initial investigation of the issues of content.

ART 302 Drawing and Composition II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Drawing Fundamentals
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 205

This course further develops the skills and concepts introduced in ART 300. It covers the relationships between formal elements such as line, shape, color, texture, value, perspective, and spatial relationships. It emphasizes the creative use of materials. It also includes critiques of student, historical, and contemporary works of art. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate intermediate level technical skills and concepts in drawing
  • investigate methods toward the achievement of personal expression and self direction
  • critically evaluate one's own artwork and the works of others
  • design works utilizing principles of composition
  • invent new methods for incorporating color theory within each artwork

ART 304 Figure Drawing I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Figure Studies
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 200

This course introduces and explores the human structure based on the history and traditions of the human figure in art. Skills are developed by critically analyzing, drawing, and composing the undraped figure in a representational manner from direct observation. A variety of media are introduced in the exploration of the human form. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and discuss images of the human form found in art works throughout history.
  • analyze, compose, and construct a variety of figure drawing skills with respect to using line, shape, value, and color.
  • demonstrate and apply a variety of drawing techniques to describe anatomy, proportion, and planar structure of the human form.
  • demonstrate control over various methods and media of drawing the figure.
  • discuss, critically assess, and evaluate depictions of the human form.

ART 305 Figure Drawing II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Figure Studies
  • Prerequisite:ART 304 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ART 312
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course continues the study of the human figure in art as begun in ART 304. The pursuit of more complex strategies and skills are developed by critically analyzing, drawing, and composing the undraped figure. The use of color tools and the development of personal style are emphasized. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess, evaluate, and discuss depictions of the human figure found in art history.
  • demonstrate through drawing a greater knowledge of human anatomy, proportion, and gesture.
  • demonstrate the use of color in a variety of drawing applications and color medias.
  • analyze and respond to one's own artwork and the work of others during individual and group critique(s).
  • develop a subjective and personal style based on historical theory and concepts.
  • create a portfolio of drawings where the figure is the focus and context.

ART 306 Facial Expression and Anatomy

  • Same As:ARTNM 320
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ART 304
  • Transferable:CSU

This course covers human facial expression and anatomy using live models, anatomical references, and imagination. Issues of expression as it relates to skeletal and muscular anatomy are addressed through a series of projects. This course is not open to students who have taken ARTNM 320.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • draw the human skull in order to understand the three-dimensional form.
  • apply facial muscular structure to the skull.
  • evaluate the muscular code for universal facial expressions.
  • create the human head with varying expressions using 2D media.
  • create meaningful exaggerations of expression using 2D media.
  • evaluate the muscles and muscle dynamics responsible for facial expression.

ART 312 Portrait Drawing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ART 304
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I

This course introduces the study of the human image in portraiture. Emphasis is on developing the skills needed to portray specific individuals rather than a generalized image of people. Included are the history and traditions of portraiture, the use of color media, and the development of personal style. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess, evaluate, and discuss human portraiture found in art history.
  • describe human facial anatomy and plane structure.
  • create an accurate likeness of an individual using a variety of techniques and materials.
  • develop a subjective and personal style based on historical theory and concepts.
  • create a portfolio of artworks where the human portrait is the focus and context.

ART 314 Introduction to Illustration

  • Same As:ARTNM 370
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Applied Drawing
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course is a survey of the history of illustration, defining areas of specialization and the illustrator's role in visual communication. The appropriate use of materials, tools and methods is evaluated. Illustration is analyzed as a method of visual problem solving through a series of projects with varied applications. This course is not open to students who have taken ARTNM 370.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the history of illustration.
  • examine areas of specialization of illustration and analyze required skills for illustrators.
  • apply illustration techniques with a variety of media.
  • produce a range of visual styles.
  • evaluate the appropriate style and media choice in terms of client, audience and print methods.

ART 317 Character Design

  • Same As:ARTNM 372
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Applied Drawing
  • Prerequisite:ART 302 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ART 304 and ARTNM 302
  • Transferable:CSU

This course introduces the visual development of characters based on archetypal patterns. Students will consider backstory, personality, and physical attributes. Fundamental drawing skills such as shape, form, anatomical structure, and motion will be included. Both digital and traditional media are applied. It also covers the graphical development of characters for animation, games, comics, graphic novels, children's books, and illustrated novels. It is not open to students who have completed ARTNM 372.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop a comprehensive process for designing characters including character profile, reference, thumbnails, and refinements.
  • quickly concept multiple variations for a character including body type, head structure, facial expression, motion studies, and costume.
  • differentiate multiple characters based on clear, definable silhouettes.
  • develop costumes for a character based on time period, environment, and social class.
  • produce accurate turnarounds for a character.

ART 320 Design: Fundamentals

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 100

This course focuses on the fundamentals of design, establishing a foundation for intermediate and advanced art courses as well as developing a visual and verbal vocabulary essential to understanding and appreciating art and design esthetics. Design principles are applied through a series of studio projects that are derived from the study of both historical schools of art as well as contemporary theory. The elements of line, shape, form, spatial relationships, value, and color are analyzed in concert with their use by artists throughout history. Projects utilize a wide range of tools, media, and presentation techniques. This course is not open to students who have completed ARTNM 310

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design and create compositions using the principles of organization: unity, balance, harmony-variety, rhythm, pattern, proportion/scale, movement, and economy.
  • build a body of work using visual gestalt theory and elements of design: line, shape, value, color, texture, and space.
  • analyze works of fine art and design to critically assess components of subject, form, and content.
  • compare and contrast historical works of art as they relate to an overall formal assessment of design.
  • investigate modern and contemporary works of art to compare their formal similarities and differences from historical works.
  • measure one's own work in terms of premise and concepts of design and their relationship to content.

ART 323 Design: Color Theory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ART 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 270

This course studies the principles, theories, and application of additive and subtractive color in two dimensions. Included is the use of color systems found in major historical and contemporary artistic styles. A portfolio of design projects in applied color systems is required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and analyze historical and contemporary use of color in relation to color systems.
  • distinguish the use of color models, including color relationships and color proportions.
  • utilize stylistic technique that indicate an understanding of color application in art history.
  • organize materials, vehicles, binders, opaque and transparent media, color mixing, and color interactions.
  • create aesthetic designs or images, utilizing the various properties of color and color theories.
  • analyze the function of color in design with regard to harmonies, contrast, emphasis, balance, form, space, light, rhythm and movement.
  • integrate principles from additive and subtractive color systems to compose color compositions.
  • explain how color is perceived physiologically, psychologically, symbolically and intuitively.

ART 324 Collage and Assemblage

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1

This course investigates the creation of artworks using the technique of collage and assemblage (the process of assembling and adhering diverse materials and found objects onto another surface). The history of collage and assemblage and basic design theories are introduced. Development of a personal visual style is encouraged. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create collage and assemblage artworks based on found and/or chosen materials.
  • organize the use of basic design elements such as line, shape, value, color, texture, space, and composition to create collage and assemblage artworks.
  • develop expressive content through the manipulation of collage and assemblage techniques.
  • describe historical and contemporary developments, trends, materials, and approaches in collage and assemblage.
  • assess and critique collage and assemblage artworks in group, individual, and written contexts using relevant critique formats, concepts, and terminology.
  • create a diverse collection of visual elements, such as fragments, scraps, or found objects to build a personal clip-art file for collage and assemblage projects.
  • construct a portfolio of collage and assemblage artworks for presentation.

ART 327 Painting I

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Painting
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 or 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 210

This course introduces basic techniques and materials of painting. It includes the survey of historical and contemporary development of painting with emphasis on perceptual and technical skills, such as, color theory, paint mixing and technique, and creative responses to materials and subject matter. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create paintings that demonstrate a working knowledge of the physical properties of painting materials.
  • identify, discuss, and integrate elements and principles of design into the painting process.
  • evaluate and apply the basic principles of color theory to painting projects.
  • construct and prepare various supports and/or substrates for painting projects.
  • develop expressive content through manipulation of mark, color, value, and composition.
  • describe historical and contemporary developments, trends, materials, and approaches in painting.
  • assess and critique paintings in group, individual, and written contexts using relevant critique formats, concepts, and terminology.
  • safely handle and use studio painting materials and equipment.

ART 328 Painting II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Painting
  • Prerequisite:ART 327 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course expands on the basic painting techniques and materials introduced in ART 327. It encourages the development of artistic style and general and specific criticism found in the history of painting. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop a personal painting style.
  • express more fully and in greater detail the techniques of painting.
  • use principles of design and color theory in painting projects.
  • apply historical, contemporary, and theoretical approaches in painting projects.
  • assess and critique paintings in group, individual, and written contexts using relevant critique formats, concepts, and terminology.
  • construct and document an initial portfolio of paintings for professional presentation.

ART 329 Painting III

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Painting
  • Prerequisite:ART 327 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course further develops the skills and concepts introduced in ART 327. Included is the survey of historical and contemporary styles in painting as this pertains to the development of individual style and self expression. Topics may include; post-modern expression, such as image and text; mixed-media; and combining varied styles and techniques within a single artwork. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate advanced skills in painting techniques using a variety of materials and subjects.
  • evaluate major historical and contemporary trends, using correct terminology related to concepts, materials and techniques in painting.
  • analyze the relationship of using 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional sources as content and subject in painting.
  • construct and document an initial portfolio of artworks for professional presentation.

ART 330 Mural Painting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 or 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ART 327 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course provides a survey of mural painting as a public art form. It introduces the historical use of mural painting and examines the process of creating a mural painting by analyzing a site, researching, planning, and executing murals in public spaces, and working collaboratively with others. Field trips may be required to execute the work on location.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish the historical use of mural painting by different cultures throughout the world.
  • work collaboratively with others to execute a mural as a public art form.
  • evaluate and record the process of creating a mural painting from surveying the site to executing the work.
  • apply and describe the planning stages in a large-scale mural project.
  • adapt the appropriate media and techniques for each chosen mural site.

ART 336 Watercolor Painting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Painting
  • Prerequisite:ART 300 or 320 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course introduces painting with aqueous media and techniques, including watercolor, gouache, and acrylic. It emphasizes historical and contemporary development, technical skill, color relationship(s), and self-expression using aqueous media in painting. Different artists and topics are covered each semester. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe major historical and contemporary trends in painting focusing on aqueous media.
  • demonstrate skills in basic painting materials and techniques focusing on aqueous media.
  • evaluate and apply the basic principles of color theory in aqueous painting technique.
  • integrate elements and principles of design into the painting process focusing on aqueous media.
  • prepare supports and/or substrates for painting in the aqueous media.

ART 337 Intermediate Watercolor Painting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Painting
  • Prerequisite:ART 336 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course continues the study of the aqueous medium in painting begun in ART 336. More complex methods, concepts, varying approaches, and techniques using the aqueous medium are developed. Personal style is emphasized. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate advanced skills with a variety of materials and subjects, using aqueous painting techniques.
  • evaluate major historical and contemporary trends, using correct terminology related to concepts, materials, and techniques in aqueous painting.
  • develop a subjective and personal style based on the concepts, materials, and techniques of aqueous painting.
  • analyze and respond to one's own artwork and the work of others during individual and group critique(s).
  • construct and document a portfolio of aqueous paintings for professional presentation.

ART 339 Integrating Digital Media with Traditional Media I

  • Same As:ARTNM 331
  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I

This course combines the materials and techniques used in both new media technology and traditional art practices. It explores a wide variety of ideas, tools, and resources. Topics include history, theory, and practice surrounding digital and traditional image generation, image manipulation, image transfer, and material exploration. The course emphasizes developing unique forms of portfolio quality projects demonstrating new approaches and methods of integrating digital media with traditional media forms.

This course is not available to students who have taken ARTNM 331.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • combine materials and techniques used in both new media technology and traditional art practices.
  • create successful compositions using knowledge of history, theory, and practice surrounding digital and traditional image generation.
  • create successful compositions using knowledge of history, theory, and practice surrounding digital and traditional image manipulation.
  • create successful compositions using knowledge of history, theory, and practice surrounding digital and traditional image transfer.
  • generate dynamic portfolio-quality projects, which demonstrate new approaches and methods of merging digital media with traditional media.

ART 361 Printmaking: Survey

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Printmaking
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 220

This course covers various printmaking techniques, including but not limited to: relief printing, (wood, linoleum, collagraph, and rubber); monotype; stencil and/or silkscreen printing; and repetitive stencil printing. Each semester, different artists and/or visual examples are discussed. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compose or design works of art that use the printmaking technique.
  • safely handle and maintain print lab equipment.
  • describe and develop conceptual structures of art within a specific printmaking process.
  • create a portfolio demonstrating a broad range of printmaking techniques.
  • critique artworks using correct terminology related to concepts, materials, and techniques of printmaking.

ART 370 Three Dimensional Design

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area C1
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 101

This foundation course covers an analysis of historical and contemporary designs, primarily concerned with the visual dialogue between form and space, with focus on visual sensitivity for three-dimensional composition. Line, plane, and volume are utilized to construct 3-D forms using a variety of materials which may include but is not limited to clay, metal, wood, fibers, mixed media, plaster, and paper.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and understand the formal elements and organizing principles of three-dimensional art.
  • independently produce objects, forms, and problem-solving projects that successfully incorporate the basic elements and organizing principles of three-dimensional art.
  • discuss, describe, analyze, and critique three-dimensional works of art through references to the formal elements and principles of design.
  • make individual aesthetic decisions and judgments related to their own design work.
  • translate ideas and visual experience into tactile forms objects using both formal and conceptual approaches.
  • recognize the presence of specific design elements and principles in works of art as well as in the surrounding everyday physical world, throughout history and across cultures.
  • compose in three dimensions and work with a variety of media which may include but is not limited to clay, wood, metal, paint, plaster, paper, fibers, mixed media, in an appropriate and safe manner.

ART 371 Foundry Casting for Sculpture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Sculpture
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course introduces the techniques, metallurgy, and practice of casting bronze and aluminum for sculpture using the sand molding method. Emphasis is placed on historical examples, design, techniques, vocabulary, and safety. Patterns are utilized directly with sand to create sculptures in metal. Different artists and topics are covered each semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create individual art works through a process of conception, design, execution, finish and presentation.
  • describe and utilize tools and technology (such as forms, molds, crucible, melting furnace, and metal pouring equipment) to create art works.
  • analyze and apply safety related chemicals and metal working equipment.
  • organize a foundry heat and process information/tasks both orally and in written formats.
  • critique art work in both oral and written formats.
  • discuss the historical and theoretical aspects of both design and techniques in art metal casting.
  • describe experimental methods of metal casting, fabrication, and finish of cast art works.
  • draw blueprint sketches of the artwork to be cast.
  • demonstrate the proper technique for applying patinas.

ART 372 Sculpture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Sculpture
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area C1

This is an introductory course in sculpture. It covers expressive use of form, color, and various sculptural methods, such as additive and subtractive media using clay and plaster, and constructive media like wood and steel; found objects and other materials may also be explored. This course utilizes a problem-solving format in order to develop knowledge of technical process, formal vocabulary, and individual expression. Both historical and contemporary approaches in developing form and content are included. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • create objects in various three-dimensional media.
  • display basic skills and craftsmanship in creating sculptural works of art using the formal principles of design and visual elements.
  • identify historical and contemporary sculpture as well as influences of non-Western sculpture.
  • apply formal design and sculpture terminology to critique and evaluate artworks.

ART 373 Intermediate Sculpture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Sculpture
  • Prerequisite:ART 372 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This is an intermediate course in the practice of the expressive use of form in three-dimensional space. It utilizes traditional additive and subtractive media, as well as constructive media, and other contemporary materials. This course utilizes a problem-solving format in order to develop knowledge of technical process, formal vocabulary, and individual expression. It examines both historical and contemporary approaches in developing form and content.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • utilize compositional principles as they apply to three-dimensional form and space.
  • discuss and demonstrate his/her knowledge of traditional and contemporary sculptural techniques.
  • compare and contrast properties of sculpture form and space.
  • develop his/her creative abilities and individual expression through problem-solving assignments.
  • further develop the ability to generate related visual problems based on a variety of source material.

ART 374 Sculpture Lab

  • Units:1 - 2
  • Hours:54 - 108 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ART 324, 370, 371, 372, 373, or 375
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (Credit granted only if concurrently enrolled in ART 372, 373 or 375)

This course offers laboratory experience to assist in completing complex sculpture projects. It focuses on the development of a personal creative vision furthering technical skills and complex problem solving.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the relationship between content and mechanical skills in plaster fabrication to include composition, form, carving, constructing, molding, and finishing.
  • exhibit skills in wax fabrication for bronze casting.
  • exhibit safe and proper use of necessary mixed media equipment such as a band saw, drill press, grinder, and welders.
  • exhibit skills in clay fabrication to include composition, form, molding, constructing, and finishing.
  • analyze and select appropriate materials and techniques necessary to explore personal artistic vision.

ART 375 Figure Sculpture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Figure Studies
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ART 304
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course introduces figure sculpture, using the live undraped model as reference. Concepts of human anatomy are emphasized through the use of quick gestural studies and sustained sculptural projects. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • construct sculptures of human gestures using ceramic clay.
  • construct a free standing figure sculpture using an armature.
  • analyze human anatomical structure through accurate representational form.
  • analyze human anatomical structure using the figure to give form to personal thoughts and ideas.
  • evaluate work by applying contemporary and traditional figurative sculpture concepts.

ART 376 Functional Sculpture

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Sculpture
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU

This course covers the hands-on basics of metal forming, design principles and materials used for sculpture, and functional art forms with emphasis on the use of the anvil and the gas forge. Topics include hand forging metal techniques, furniture and sculpture design, finishing processes, and the use of patinas.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design and execute sculptural concepts in the medium using the anvil and the gas forge.
  • apply traditional and non-traditional metal working techniques to 3-dimensional functional and nonfunctional art forms.
  • demonstrate the proper and safe use of a gas forge, the anvil and other related metal working equipment.
  • demonstrate skill in the blacksmith techniques such as punching, twisting, drawing out, and upsetting.

ART 390 Ceramics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Ceramics-Hybrid
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area C1

This course is a beginning ceramics class in hand building and throwing techniques. Elementary clay construction including pinch pot, coil, slab, and slump molds are covered as well as an introduction to the potter's wheel. Different methods of glazing and firing
are studied. The history and theory of ceramics are examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify basic ceramic terminology
  • distinguish between craft and fine art
  • incorporate skills to build sculptural objects in clay
  • create functional and non-functional ceramic work employing proficient technique
  • differentiate and apply principles of design and theory to ceramic work
  • research ceramic artwork and history

ART 391 Intermediate Ceramics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Ceramics-Hybrid
  • Prerequisite:ART 390 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This is an intermediate course in wheel-throwing and sculpture techniques. It explores the technical and creative processes of ceramic pottery making and sculpture including surface treatment and various firing processes. Focus is placed on an in-depth examination of contemporary ceramics. Different artists, techniques, and projects are explored each semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate skills of wheel-throwing and hand- building ceramic techniques
  • investigate the history and theory of ceramics
  • create ceramic sculpture and pottery
  • examine and integrate design, concept, and aesthetics in ceramic sculpture
  • critique ceramic art work

ART 397 Alternative Firing Processes in Ceramics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Ceramics-Hybrid
  • Prerequisite:ART 390 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course covers alternative firing processes in ceramics which include raku, wood, soda, saggar, sawdust, and pit firing. Ceramics is explored through hand-building and wheel-throwing techniques. Glaze formulation for the firing processes is included. Emphasis is placed on in-depth examinations of the history of kilns and firing techniques. Different firing processes are explored each semester. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe characteristics of alternative kilns and firing processes.
  • create and produce artwork in clay specific to alternative firing techniques.
  • select clay and glazes pertinent to alternative firing processes.
  • critique ceramic art work.
  • practice kiln maintenance.
  • demonstrate safe kiln loading, unloading, and firing practices.

ART 398 Ceramic Murals and Tiles

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Ceramics-Hybrid
  • Prerequisite:ART 390 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course introduces ceramic mural and tile methods and techniques. It explores the technical and creative process of site-specific mural and tile making including bas relief, press molds, various surface treatments, and installation methods. Focus is placed on an in-depth examination of the history of ceramic tiles and murals.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design artworks that are site-specific.
  • research art history as it applies to projects.
  • draw and design murals/tiles before producing them in clay.
  • create ceramic tiles and murals.
  • experiment with different surface treatments for murals.
  • apply various installation techniques.

ART 420 Film Making

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ART 420 & 422 combined: maximum credit - one course)
  • General Education:CSU Area C1

This course involves completing a series of short, individual and/or group projects, focusing on various methods and techniques that can be used to create films/videos which are visually sophisticated and conceptually interesting. Work by contemporary and historically-significant filmmakers is also covered.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and discuss technical aspects of film making, comparing contemporary and historical perspectives
  • identify and apply the formal elements of film making, comparing contemporary and historical perspectives
  • differentiate between various types of lighting and demonstrate the relationships between lighting and form
  • demonstrate distinction between subject movement, camera movement, and mechanical movement
  • apply the scriptwriting principles of character uniqueness and development, subtext, conflict, content, and symbolism
  • discuss and demonstrate major theories of film editing, comparing contemporary and historical perspectives

ART 430 Art and Children

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1

This course introduces the use of artists' materials and techniques appropriate for teaching art to children. It includes the study of art history, including various movements (ism's) and concepts in creating artwork. This course covers the process of creating lesson plans, doing preparatory work for presenting art projects, and creation of drawings, paintings, and sculptures. It also covers how to identify and properly use, maintain, store, and clean commonly used art materials. Topics include proper identification, utilization, and presentation of basic art principles, and an understanding of age-specific capabilities in children. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify varying techniques for handling common art materials.
  • develop skills and techniques to communicate basic art principles.
  • organize an appropriate sequential plan for art education in the elementary schools.
  • analyze age-specific capabilities of children in terms of the visual arts.
  • propose appropriate art resources for use with specific groups of students.
  • investigate a variety of cultural and age-specific methods of expression.
  • assess the historical and social uses of art.

ART 440 Artists' Materials and Techniques

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Studio Art and Practice
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I

This course focuses on analyzing and developing artists' mediums and techniques. Historical information about various materials and their relationship to personal imagery and style are emphasized. The composition of pigments, their origins, and various binders are explored. The construction of various artists' substrates and supports as well as the techniques of matting and framing art work are also covered. A supply fee may be required for this course. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • categorize a broad sampling of artists' materials and techniques of historical, traditional, and modern practices.
  • analyze the composition and use of artists' materials and techniques focusing on two-dimensional mediums.
  • compare the technological advances of artists' materials and techniques throughout history.
  • relate vocabulary and techniques to a variety of artists' mediums.
  • explore the process of creating artists' materials and techniques based on historical, traditional, and modern practices.

ART 442 Introduction to Art Gallery Operations

  • Units:2
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Gallery Management
  • Prerequisite:Successful completion of two studio courses from ART, ARTNM, ARTPH.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course introduces gallery operations to art students. It involves hands-on experience in curating, planning, and installing exhibitions. A portion of this course is offered in a TBA component of 16-30 hours which may include work as a gallery attendant or gallery docent. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply knowledge obtained in art history lectures in order to create exhibitions thematically to gallery exhibitions.
  • identify problems and select solutions for displaying art work.
  • demonstrate responsibility for gallery scheduling and exhibition procedures.
  • discuss contemporary art and artists with gallery patrons.

ART 443 Art Gallery Operations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Gallery Management
  • Prerequisite:ART 442 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course continues students' experiences in gallery operations, including handling artwork; installing art exhibits; interacting with artists, patrons, and the public; planning and curating; inventory and maintenance of artwork; and gallery and student outreach. A portion of this course is offered in a TBA component of 16-30 hours which may include work experience as a gallery attendant or docent. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply developed knowledge to organize art exhibitions in a gallery setting.
  • identify and solve problems related to displaying artworks in an evolved and creative manner.
  • demonstrate higher and enlightened responsibility for gallery scheduling and exhibition procedures.
  • develop and utilize terminology associated with the visual arts while communicating with artists and gallery patrons.
  • demonstrate improved knowledge of art and culture as it relates to the history of museums and gallery institutions.

ART 444 Art Gallery and Portfolio Preparation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Studio Art and Practice
  • Prerequisite:ART 442 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:ENGWR 101 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers study in both sides of the business world of art, including gaining entrance into galleries as an artist and finding, installing, and advertising professional gallery exhibitions. It emphasizes the creation of individual portfolios and portfolio management. Topics include selecting exhibitions, creating announcements, organizing receptions, and sending out press releases in addition to photographing art and preparing documents to accompany exhibitions. It also covers creating artist statements, digital portfolios properly formatted on a disk, business cards, cover letters, and resumes. Field trips to galleries and museums may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and demonstrate procedures for displaying artwork
  • develop, record, and maintain accountability for gallery schedules
  • create press releases and maintain public relations and proper advertising procedures for a gallery
  • develop system for organization of gallery exhibitions
  • assess artwork for installation purposes
  • evaluate and produce a professional portfolio of art, including digital images, artist statement, resume, cover letter, and business cards

ART 445 Art Gallery Operations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Gallery Management
  • Prerequisite:ART 443 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course continues students' experiences in gallery operations. It provides additional exposure to gallery operations, including planning and installing exhibitions, lighting techniques, assistance in maintaining a permanent art collection, introduction to conservation techniques, participation in staffing and docent activities, gallery and student outreach programs, and assistance with additional on- and off-campus exhibitions. A portion of this course is offered in a TBA component of 16-30 hours which may include work experience as a gallery attendant or docent. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply practical knowledge obtained in both art history and studio courses, and in previous gallery operation experiences.
  • distinguish advanced gallery procedures and solve problems related to displaying and documenting works of art in an exhibition setting.
  • prioritize responsibilities for gallery scheduling and exhibition procedures utilizing advanced skills based on previous experiences.
  • integrate knowledge of contemporary and historical art and artists in the communication of art with the community.
  • develop writing skills in order to create proposals for exhibitions and to generate community interest by presenting articles, essays, and press releases.

ART 470 Art Lab

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ART 300, 302, 304, 305, 306, 312, 314, 317, 320, 323, 324, 327, 328, 329, 330, 336, 337, 339, 361, 440, ARTNM 320, 331, 370, OR 372.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers additional lab hours to more fully develop creative vision and technical skills. It provides additional assistance in assignments and portfolio development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and select materials and techniques necessary to explore personal artistic vision.
  • develop a portfolio of artwork for presentation.

ART 494 Topics in Art

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:6 - 48 hours LEC; 9 - 72 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course is designed to offer unique, meaningful, or transient topics in art that are not included in current course offerings. Topics may include glass blowing; air brush, encaustic, fresco, or sumi painting technique; or bronze casting, for example.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • construct projects utilizing the techniques which are demonstrated in each topic of study.
  • compare and contrast art historical influences pertaining to each topic of study.
  • evaluate personal skill level pertaining to each topic of study.
  • evaluate the job potential in the topic of study discussed.

ART 495 Independent Studies in Art

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


ART 498 Work Experience in Art

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position, or job related to art with a cooperating site supervisor. Students are advised to consult with the Art Department faculty to review specific certificate and degree work experience requirements.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of art. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer-level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce, completion of Title 5 required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site, and developing workplace skills and competencies.


During the semester, the student is required to complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. All students are required to attend the first class meeting, a mid-semester meeting, and a final meeting. Additionally, students who have not already successfully completed a Work Experience course will be required to attend weekly orientations while returning participants may meet individually with the instructor as needed. Students may take up to 16 units total across all Work Experience course offerings. This course may be taken up to four times when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate application of industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in the field of art related to a transfer degree level career as written in the minimum three (3) learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • make effective decisions, use workforce information, and manage his/her personal career plans.
  • behave professionally, ethically, and legally at work, consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and organizational norms.
  • behave responsibly at work, exhibiting initiative and self-management in situations where it is needed.
  • apply effective leadership styles at work, with consideration to group dynamics, team and individual decision making, and workforce diversity.
  • communicate in oral, written, and other formats, as needed, in a variety of contexts at work.
  • locate, organize, evaluate, and reference information at work.
  • demonstrate originality and inventiveness at work by combining ideas or information in new ways, making connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, and reshaping goals in ways that reveal new possibilities using critical and creative thinking skills such as logical reasoning, analytical thinking, and problem-solving.

Art History (ARTH)

ARTH 300 Introduction to Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ARTH 300 & 480 combined: maximum credit - one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTH 100

This course is a survey of the history and analysis of the visual arts, including drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, and additional media. It offers a foundation for understanding art. Field trips to art galleries or museums may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • critically evaluate the basic elements of an artwork.
  • categorize the varying processes of art-making.
  • analyze different historical periods of art.
  • identify different styles of art.
  • describe a new way to look at art.
  • compare and contrast different art styles.
  • compare and contrast different historical periods of art.

ARTH 302 Art: Stone Age Through the Middle Ages

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTH 110

This course is a study of the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the ancient Near East and Europe from the Stone Age through the Middle Ages. Art works of each period are discussed and related to respective cultures. Field trips and/or individual visitation to art galleries and museums are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze major periods of art from the Stone Age through the Middle Ages.
  • critique individual works of art from different periods.
  • compare the quality and importance of different works of art from the same historical period.

ARTH 308 Renaissance Tradition in Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:Part of C-ID ARTH 120

This course is a study of painting, sculpture, and architecture of European and U.S. cultures from the 14th century early Renaissance to the mid-19th century. Outstanding art works of each major period are discussed, analyzed, and placed within historical context. A field trip to an art museum or art gallery may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the visual artistic developments of Western cultures from the 14th century to the mid-19th century.
  • analyze important works of art from each of the major periods presented.
  • compare significant stylistic innovations from different artists and historical periods.
  • compare the roles of art and artists within Renaissance and later societies.

ARTH 310 Modern Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTH 150; Part of C-ID ARTH 120

This course covers 18th, 19th, 20th and 21st century art forms including painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe and America. Styles discussed include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, and the major movements of the 20th century. Post-Modern art is also discussed. A field trip to an art museum or art gallery may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify major works of art and architecture from the Neoclassical period to the contemporary period.
  • discuss and distinguish styles and stylistic changes in art from the Neoclassical period to the contemporary period.
  • interpret and evaluate art and architecture from the Neoclassical period to the contemporary period within their cultural and historical contexts.
  • formulate and analyze meanings and functions of art and architecture from the Neoclassical period to the contemporary period.

ARTH 318 History of American Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; or ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1

This course covers art in America from initial European contact to the present day. Topics include initial images of the New World made by Europeans; early art and architecture that reflects a synthesis of Native and European traditions; Colonial and early American art, architecture, and decorative arts; 19th-century portraits, landscapes, and history paintings; and regional and later modernist American art of the twentieth century. This course emphasizes the influence of European traditions as well as the history of a variety of cultures in the present day United States, the variety of styles and patrons in the country, and the way in which cultural values find expression in art, architecture, and decorative arts. An individual or group field trip to a museum or art gallery is required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recall and identify major works of art and architecture created in America from the 15th century to the present day.
  • compare and contrast art objects created in America from the 15th century to the present day.
  • critique and analyze American art, architecture, and decorative arts based on aesthetic and functional qualities.
  • identify and interpret sources of influence for American art, architecture, and decorative arts.
  • synthesize American cultural values and their artistic expressions.
  • describe how historical, social, or political contexts can be seen in the styles or types of art objects coming from specific American regions or eras.

ARTH 322 Art History of the Non-Western World

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This is a survey of art history throughout the Non-Western world. It covers the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the peoples of India, Africa, Asia, the Americas, the Arctic, Australia, and Oceania. The time period spans from the Stone Age to the 18th century. Field trips and/or individual visits to art galleries and museums are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the different visual arts styles of Non-Western cultures.
  • discuss and describe the diversity in art throughout the world.
  • compare the aesthetic motivation and cultural purposes of various art forms.
  • compare traditional multicultural and international art periods.

ARTH 333 Introduction to Islamic Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This course surveys the art and culture of the Middle East. It focuses on Islamic art and architecture and provides fundamental information on the formation of Islamic art, its history, and philosophy. It includes visual examples from Arabic, Persian, and Indian cultures.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the influential elements in the formation and production of Islamic art considering the social, political, and historical backdrop against which Islamic art flourished, including the role of the unorthodox interpretation of Islam relating to artistic endeavors.
  • demonstrate an awareness of the critical issues within the field of "Islamic art" such as the use of the term “Islamic” in Islamic art and the application of methodology in the interpretation of the art.
  • demonstrate knowledge of and comparatively analyze examples of the various branches of the art and architecture and the relating arts, for example the art of the book, calligraphy, and book illumination as part of the art of the object, religious and secular architecture, and the building decorative arts as seen in the realm of architecture.
  • analyze the mutual impact of Islam and other cultures both in the East and the West and identify the elements of mutual appropriation in their visual art.

ARTH 334 International Contemporary Art

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This course is a worldwide survey of trends in art, including painting, sculpture, and architecture since 1980, with an emphasis on the diversity of contemporary global cultures. New art mediums, such as video, computer, street art, and performance art are highlighted. This course focuses on social and political commentary in art. A field trip to a local art exhibition may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • appraise representative artists and artworks from a number of different world cultures.
  • analyze current trends in painting, sculpture, photography, film, architecture, and new visual art mediums.
  • evaluate an artwork's visual elements as well as its social or political content.
  • critique the effectiveness of postmodern artworks.
  • analyze current controversies and legal matters in art as well as artists' changing roles as participants in contemporary society.

ARTH 335 Survey of Photography

  • Same As:ARTPH 345
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This course is a survey of photography. It explores the evolution of the photographic medium, its impact on art, culture, and history from the inception of photography to current trends. This survey covers various genres, including fine art, journalism, science, and social media. Field trips may be required. This course is not open to students who have completed ARTPH 345.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the different photographic genres throughout history.
  • compare the different visual art periods and styles of photography.
  • describe and discuss the cultural impact of photography on society.
  • evaluate the influence of photography on other artistic mediums.

Art Photography (ARTPH)

ARTPH 300 Basic Art Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1
  • C-ID:C-ID ARTS 260

This course examines the formal and technical aspects of 35mm film photography. Topics include critiques of major movements in the history of photography and contemporary silver-gelatin process artists. A problem-solving approach is utilized to explore compositional ideas. Camera operation, black and white film developing, and silver-gelatin printmaking are covered. Digital photography file management and editing concepts are introduced through film scans. A 35mm single lens reflex (SLR) camera as well as darkroom and portfolio supplies are required. Processing chemicals are provided. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate principles of form as they apply to basic photography.
  • manage camera, lens, and exposure techniques in various shooting situations.
  • choose film processing and print enlarging techniques.
  • recognize various photographic trends.
  • critique photographs from the history of photography, current exhibits, and student work for technical print quality and composition.
  • evaluate traditional prints and digital prints.
  • choose file formats and resolution for film scans.
  • apply basic digital editing techniques to film scans.

ARTPH 302 Black and White Silver Gelatin Photography Lab

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Studio Art and Practice
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ARTPH 300 or 340
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers additional lab hours to more fully develop creative vision and technical skills in black and white silver gelatin photography. It also allows alternative process photographers additional lab hours for development of film and digital negatives. It provides additional assistance in assignments and portfolio development for ARTPH 300 and ARTPH 340.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • process film and film scan exposures, wet-lab prints, and digital prints from film scans.
  • evaluate wet-lab, archival inkjet and type c-prints for content, quality, and presentation.
  • prepare bodies of photographic work for varied clients including galleries, customers, and publications.

ARTPH 305 Digital Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of "C" or better; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320 with a grade of "C" or better. ARTNM 302 with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I

This is a course in basic digital photography. Topics include digital camera functions, exposure systems using f-stop and shutter speed combinations, digital shooting practices, photographic composition and aesthetics, editing tools and software, and print portfolio development. It also includes issues in contemporary photography and the history of photography. Digital cameras with adjustable f-stops and shutter speeds, camera memory cards, and re-writable memory devices are required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • choose f-stop and shutter speed combinations for various exposure systems and situations
  • evaluate digital photographs for quality and aesthetics
  • critique digital and traditional photographs
  • assess digital photography editing needs
  • prioritize software tools and applications to edit digital photographs
  • systematize the digital editing work flow
  • assemble digital and print portfolios
  • identify major movements and artists from the history of photography

ARTPH 306 Photography Lab: Digital Editing

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Studio Art and Practice
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ARTPH 305, 310, 322, or 360
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers additional lab hours to more fully develop creative vision and technical skills in digital image editing, processing, and printing. It provides additional assistance in assignments and portfolio development in ARTPH 305, ARTPH 310, ARTPH 322, and ARTPH 360.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • download and process images in LightRoom, Bridge, Camera Raw, and PhotoShop
  • evaluate processing tools and software
  • evaluate plug-ins and non-Adobe image processing

ARTPH 310 Intermediate Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ARTPH 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course covers the technical control of black and white photographic materials and equipment. Professional camera techniques and the creative aspects of photography are emphasized. A 35mm single lens reflex (SLR) or digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera or digital camera with manual options is required. Darkroom and portfolio supplies are also required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast advanced photographic controls in the production of negatives, film enlargements, and digital prints
  • evaluate a fine art photograph in terms of content and technique
  • analyze digital and film prints for technical and aesthetic concerns
  • critique advanced photographic and printing techniques from the history of photography and current trends in photography
  • choose lighting techniques for portraiture and still life photography
  • evaluate lighting conditions for contrast and quality
  • apply color concepts to black and white images

ARTPH 315 Trends in Software and Social Media for Photographers

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ARTPH 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 116 AND ENGWR 102; OR ESLR 320 AND ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course covers basic trends in photographic editing and presentation software. Editing photographs in Photoshop and file management in Lightroom along with introductions to similar software are covered. Topics include uses of social media in presentation and dissemination of photographs for commercial purposes and clients, as well as photographic output to print, social media, and the internet.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate editing software for production of photographs for varied clients
  • assess appropriateness of varied social media for client-based shooting assignments
  • manage large volumes of image files for varied output and clients
  • edit photographs for print portfolios, digital portfolios, and the internet

ARTPH 322 Color Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ARTPH 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course covers the aesthetic aspects of color photography involving camera and digital techniques emphasizing uniqueness of expression. It includes a continuing exploration of form and composition, lighting and exposure, film characteristics and scanning, and digital capture and editing, with emphasis on color photography as an art form. Color correction, color management, work flow, and other digital concepts are included. A 35mm single lens reflex (SLR) or digital camera with manual options as well as memory devices and portfolio supplies are required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • appraise creative potential of color photographic processes
  • distinguish between psychological impact of colors as compared to black and white photography
  • choose appropriate processes, equipment, and related techniques for chosen photographic materials
  • describe major works, past and present, in the field of color photography
  • critique major works in the field of color photography
  • choose color correction and editing options for digital photographs
  • evaluate aesthetic differences in saturation and color quality in film and digital color prints
  • create a color-managed work environment linking cameras, monitors, scanners, printers and projectors to consistent profiles
  • assess image capture and editing work-flow techniques for varied commercial and fine art clients

ARTPH 340 Alternative Process Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I

This course covers alternative photographic printing processes produced in sunlight. No camera is necessary. Image processes such as salt prints, cyanotypes, Van Dyke brown prints, gum prints, palladium prints, and wet-plate photography are covered. It includes the history of photographic processes from the daguerreotype to the digital age. Negatives are produced from digital transparencies, Xerox transparencies, transparency film, and natural objects. Varied printing substrates are covered. Papers and printing surfaces, brushes, memory storage devices, digital printing resources, safety glasses, and protective gloves are required. Chemistry is provided. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess major technical developments in equipment and photographic processes
  • produce photographs in major technical forms, such as salt print, brown print, cyanotype, gum print, and palladium print
  • evaluate photographs by process and historical context
  • develop a portfolio of photographs representing varied alternative photographic processes
  • critique alternative process photographs for content and aesthetics
  • evaluate the role of alternative process photographs in historical and contemporary photographic practice

ARTPH 345 Survey of Photography

  • Same As:ARTH 335
  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C1; IGETC Area 3A

This course is a survey of photography. It explores the evolution of the photographic medium, its impact on art, culture, and history from the inception of photography to current trends. This survey covers various genres, including fine art, journalism, science, and social media. Field trips may be required. This course is not open to students who have completed ARTH 335.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the different photographic genres throughout history.
  • compare the different visual art periods and styles of photography.
  • describe and discuss the cultural impact of photography on society.
  • evaluate the influence of photography on other artistic mediums.

ARTPH 350 Documentary Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ARTPH 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course provides instruction in documentary photography and photojournalism techniques and concepts. Image production and critical discussion are emphasized. A portfolio including an extensive photo essay or documentary project is required. A 35mm single lens reflex (SLR) camera or a digital camera (dSLR) with manual options as well as darkroom, digital, and portfolio supplies are required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between news, feature, sport, fashion, documentary, and fine art photo essays
  • evaluate morality and ethics of photographic choices on documentary content
  • create and edit various photographic mediums for digital, press, and exhibit formats
  • evaluate photographs for content and message
  • investigate current and historical movements and trends in documentary media
  • prepare a photographic essay or a photographic theme

ARTPH 360 Studio Lighting

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ARTPH 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC

This course is a study in studio lighting techniques used in photography. Topics include lighting ratios, correct exposure using an electronic flash and metering, basic portraiture, choice of lighting equipment and modifiers, white balance adjustments, and color temperature. It also includes study of the history of studio photography. Black and white, color, and digital processes are included. A 35mm single lens reflex (SLR) or digital camera (dSLR) with manual options, lighting sync port, as well as darkroom or digital and portfolio supplies are required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • arrange portable continuous light units
  • evaluate studio electronic flash units
  • set up lighting combinations using pre-visualization
  • selectively measure lighting and evaluate ratios
  • evaluate white balance and color temperature
  • compose and light studio still life, portrait, and product shots
  • critique darkroom and digital prints for quality and aesthetics
  • combine mixed lighting for artistic and commercial photography
  • organize professional photographic materials and equipment
  • prepare a portfolio to apply for work in the photographic industry

ARTPH 361 Photography Lab: Studio Lighting

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Studio Art and Practice
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ARTPH 360 or 370
  • Transferable:CSU

This course offers additional lab hours to more fully develop creative vision and technical skills in studio lighting and large format photography. It provides additional assistance in assignments and portfolio development for ARTPH 360 and ARTPH 370.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • set up complex hot-light compositions
  • set up complex strobe light compositions
  • set up location lighting

ARTPH 370 Fashion, Wedding, and Portrait Photography

  • Units:3
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:ARTPH 300 or 305 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU

This course is an overview of basic fashion, wedding, and portrait photography concepts. Topics include major movements in fashion and portrait photography as well as the study of specific fashion photographers. This course also includes studio portrait lighting and styling techniques specific to fashion, wedding, and portrait photography. Wedding photojournalism is also covered. A 35mm digital camera (DSLR) with manual options is required. Fashion shoots are required. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify major movements and trends in fashion, wedding, and portrait photography throughout history
  • critique major fashion photographers for content and form
  • assess still-photography lighting problems and identify solutions
  • apply portable lighting techniques to runway, portrait, and wedding situations
  • choose exposure techniques for model photography in black and white and color photography
  • assess styling techniques for specific fashion, wedding, and portrait concepts
  • employ wedding photojournalism techniques
  • create portfolios of fashion, wedding, and portrait photographs
  • assess current digital photography technology in software and hardware

ARTPH 375 Freelance Photography Careers

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course covers careers in freelance photography including commercial photography, journalism, and fine art photography. It introduces the basic elements of implementing photography project plans, including necessary permits, aesthetic style choices, marketing, photography pricing, and portfolio presentations. This course also covers preparing, presenting, and implementing freelance photography career plans.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate personal, business, and creative strengths and insights in photography.
  • research potential career opportunities in photography.
  • create a personal plan and outline expectations of a career in photography.
  • explain photography presentation strategies including promotional campaign, print, motion, or web based.
  • assess best bookkeeping and marketing practices for photography businesses.

ARTPH 376 Photography Lab: Portfolio Development

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Course Family:Studio Art and Practice
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:Concurrent enrollment in ARTPH 300, ARTPH 305, ARTPH 310, ARTPH 320, ARTPH 340, ARTPH 350, ARTPH 360, ARTPH 370, ARTPH 375, or ARTPH 495
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (credit granted only if concurrently enrolled in ARTPH 300)

This course offers additional lab hours to more fully develop creative vision and technical skills. It provides additional assistance in assignments and portfolio development.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • choose film developing or digital processing techniques
  • control print finishing processes for portfolio development
  • produce digital and print portfolios of original photographic work

ARTPH 495 Independent Studies in Art Photography

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.


ARTPH 498 Work Experience in Art Photography

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Hours:60 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must be in a paid or unpaid internship, volunteer position, or job related to art with a cooperating site supervisor. Students are advised to consult with the Art Photography Department faculty to review specific certificate and degree work experience requirements.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area III(b)

This course provides students with opportunities to develop marketable skills in preparation for employment or advancement within the field of art photography. It is designed for students interested in work experience and/or internships in transfer-level degree occupational programs. Course content includes understanding the application of education to the workforce, completion of Title 5 required forms which document the student's progress and hours spent at the work site, and developing workplace skills and competencies.

During the semester, the student is required to complete 75 hours of related paid work experience, or 60 hours of related unpaid work experience for one unit. An additional 75 or 60 hours of related work experience is required for each additional unit. All students are required to attend the first class meeting, a mid-semester meeting, and a final meeting. Additionally, students who have not already successfully completed a Work Experience course will be required to attend weekly orientations while returning participants may meet individually with the instructor as needed. Students may take up to 16 units total across all Work Experience course offerings. This course may be taken up to four times when there are new or expanded learning objectives. Only one Work Experience course may be taken per semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate application of industry knowledge and theoretical concepts in the field of art photography related to a transfer degree level career as written in the minimum three (3) learning objectives created by the student and his/her employer or work site supervisor at the start of the course.
  • make effective decisions, use workforce information, and manage his/her personal career plans.
  • behave professionally, ethically, and legally at work, consistent with applicable laws, regulations, and organizational norms.
  • behave responsibly at work, exhibiting initiative and self-management in situations where it is needed.
  • develop effective leadership skills at work, with consideration to group dynamics, team and individual decision making, and workforce diversity.
  • communicate in oral, written, and other formats, as needed, in a variety of contexts at work.
  • locate, organize, evaluate, and reference information at work.
  • demonstrate originality and inventiveness at work by combining ideas or information in new ways, making connections between seemingly unrelated ideas, and reshaping goals in ways that reveal new possibilities using critical and creative thinking skills such as logical reasoning, analytical thinking, and problem-solving.