Anthropology

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 300 Biological Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ANTH 300 & 480 combined: maximum credit - one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the concepts, methods, and theory of biological evolution and its application to the human species. There is a specific focus on molecular, Mendelian, and population genetics as well as on the mechanisms of evolution primatology, paleoanthropology, biocultural adaptations, human variation, and current bioethical issues. The philosophy of science and the scientific method serve as foundations to this course. This course is not open to students who have completed ANTH 480.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the scientific process as a methodology for understanding the natural world
  • evaluate the nature and origins of the science of biological anthropology
  • examine the basic concepts of evolution
  • analyze the evidence to support evolution
  • survey the various methods for dating the fossil evidence of human evolution
  • compare and contrast the living primates
  • explain the current hypotheses relevant to an understanding of human evolution
  • analyze the fossil record evidence for human evolution
  • assess the nature and causes of human diversity

ANTH 301 Biological Anthropology Laboratory

  • Units:1
  • Hours:54 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Corequisite:ANTH 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:CSU Area B3; IGETC Area 5C
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 115L
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This introductory laboratory course provides opportunities to become familiar with the scientific methods of biological anthropology by investigating topics in laboratory and field situations. Topics covered in the course include the scientific method, sources of biological variation and forces of evolution, human osteology, human variation, taxonomy and comparative osteology of the primates, and the fossil evidence for human evolution. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • formulate and test simple hypotheses using the scientific method
  • describe the sources of biological variation
  • identify the bones and important markings of the human skeleton
  • calculate sex-related and age-related variations present in human populations
  • differentiate the skeletons of prosimians, monkeys, apes, and humans
  • recognize the locomotor patterns used by primates
  • identify and date the significant anthropoid, hominoid, and hominin fossils
  • evaluate problems in interpreting the fossil evidence
  • evaluate mechanisms of evolution

ANTH 303 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:BIOL 102, BIOL 115, BIOL 430, OR ANTH 300 and 301; AND eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an overview of forensic anthropology, an applied field of physical anthropology. Forensic anthropology uses the analysis of human skeletal remains to answer medico-legal questions. This course emphasizes current techniques used in analysis of human skeletal remains, medico-legal procedures, and the role of the anthropologist in the investigative process. It examines the basics of bone biology, methods of skeletal analysis, and recognition of bone pathology and trauma.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the methods and approaches of a forensic anthropologist
  • apply the techniques for determining sex, age, and ethnicity from human skeletal remains
  • examine a human skeleton and infer possible trauma and pathology
  • discuss the legal and ethical issues of working with human remains
  • apply the processes for establishing positive identification using human remains
  • explain the role of the forensic anthropologist in a criminal investigation
  • describe the dynamics of dental anthropology in positive identification
  • evaluate the significance of human skeletal remains to overall crime scene investigation

ANTH 310 Cultural Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the various customs, traditions, and forms of social organizations from a global perspective. Topics include subsistence methods, belief and religious systems, linguistics, trade and economic systems, arts, kinship systems, marriage and family systems, technology, and changes due to internal and external forces. Gender, race, and ethnic identity are examined as well as the role of society in defining these terms. Using ethnographic case studies, this course examines how anthropological ethics, methods, and theories are applied to the study of human culture. This course is not open to students who have already completed ANTH 481.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the nature of anthropology as a discipline.
  • explain the history and development of cultural anthropology.
  • evaluate the impact of cultural diversity on cross-cultural communication.
  • identify the consequences of ethnocentrism and/or racism on social interactions.
  • assess the role of applied anthropology in addressing current global conditions.
  • identify cross-cultural examples of ethnic conflict and explain its role in warfare and violence.
  • assess global trends of socio-cultural change in the areas of economic and social development.
  • create a chart demonstrating kin relationships.
  • explain the role of ethnographic fieldwork in the study of culture.

ANTH 319 Visual Anthropology: Introduction to Ethnographic Film

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the use of film by anthropologists as a research and educational tool. A series of films depicting different cultures from around the world are viewed and evaluated. Various attributes of ethnographic film and its treatment by a number of anthropological filmmakers are examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate the work of anthropologists in fieldwork settings
  • identify the multi-dimensional, sensory experience of culture
  • evaluate ethnographic films by analyzing specific elements: i.e. narration, sound, editing, degree of subject involvement, distortions and bias, and ethnographic context
  • systematize the historical development of ethnographic film-making
  • compare the style, form, and focus of different films
  • analyze ethnographic films as they pertain to controversial issues in the discipline of anthropology and in popular culture
  • discuss the shift away from the outsider's point of view to visual sovereignty since the 1980s

ANTH 320 Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 150
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the theories, concepts, and methods employed by the archaeologist in the study of human history and pre-history. The development and diverse evolution of social and cultural systems are emphasized. The challenges and achievements of non-literate and traditional cultures, diverse communities, and social classes over time are also explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the concept of culture as used by social scientists.
  • discuss the role of archaeology within the broader discipline of anthropology.
  • apply the scientific method in the study of archaeological record as it pertains to human history and pre-history.
  • distinguish between the various forms of dating technology and how they apply to the analysis of archaeological sites and artifacts.
  • incorporate archaeological evidence into an understanding of historical records and cultural behaviors.
  • discuss scientifically responsible and culturally respectful methods of archaeological retrieval and preservation including Cultural Resource Management (CRM) and adherence to Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) guidelines.
  • identify the various archaeological theories, methods, and techniques used to investigate the human past.
  • illustrate the use of archaeological methods with reference to cultural sequences.

ANTH 321 Ancient Technology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ANTH 320; Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines technological capabilities of pre-industrial societies using ethnographic and archaeological examples and an experimental approach. Topics include construction techniques of temporary and permanent structures, pottery construction, glassmaking, metallurgy, textile production, as well as bone, stone, wood, and other technologies crucial to human survival. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the relationship between technology and subsistence.
  • describe the differences between extractive/reductive and transformative crafts.
  • analyze textile structures for differences in construction techniques.
  • compare pottery construction and firing methods.
  • define basic lithic terminology.
  • compare smelting and working techniques for copper, bronze, and iron.
  • categorize types of structures according to construction technique.
  • design an experimental project to replicate at least one of the technologies addressed in the course.

ANTH 330 Magic, Witchcraft, and Religion

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a cross-cultural study of supernatural beliefs and associated rituals in traditional societies. Emphasis is on understanding the role of beliefs within the broader social context. In addition, this course examines the general functions of ritual and mythology in reinforcing cultural ideals and ethics. Similarities and differences between traditional beliefs and world religions are also explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the range of religious, ritual, and magical beliefs throughout the world and over time.
  • analyze the socio-cultural context of religious and magical beliefs.
  • describe and explain the value of diverse belief systems.
  • assess anthropological approaches to data gathering and the analysis of ceremonial, magical, and supernatural practices and beliefs.
  • integrate the role of belief and ritual in an understanding of medical and curing practices.
  • evaluate the international and inter-ethnic implications of diverse belief systems and practices in contemporary societies.

ANTH 333 American Indians of California

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D; IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course surveys the sociocultural systems of California Indians from the prehistoric period to the present. In addition to offering an overview of the diversity and complexity of aboriginal California, it includes environmental adaptations, material culture, social structure, ideology, and response to change. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe major culture areas of Native California; the environments, ecological adaptations, and features which distinguish those areas
  • contrast California Indian socioculture systems with the Spanish, Russian, and U.S. systems
  • describe the linguistic diversity and complexity of California Indians
  • evaluate the archaeological record of California Indians
  • evaluate the methods of anthropological study of California Indians and its history
  • describe the impact of European contact on California Indians
  • describe U.S. government policies on California Indians and how those policies affected Native communities

ANTH 334 Native Peoples of North America

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introductory survey of traditional Native American societies. It describes the peoples and cultures of North America and emphasizes native ecological adaptations, languages, social organizations, religions, mythologies and world views, and artistic representations. It also explores the interrelatedness of Indigenous Native American groups through trade, intermarriage, and other forms of cultural exchange. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the unique, major native culture areas of North America as well as the environments, the native ecological adaptations, and the major cultural features which distinguish those areas.
  • contrast social or cultural systems within Native North America and between the Native American and the Euro-American systems.
  • describe the linguistic diversity and complexity of Native North America.
  • explain the archaeological record of Native Peoples of North America.
  • compare Native and Western systems of categorization.
  • evaluate the history and methods of anthropological study of North American Native Peoples.
  • examine current issues among Native Peoples of North America.
  • analyze the relationship between Indigenous Native American groups and the French trappers, the various European colonists (including French, English, Russian, and Spanish), and the Mexican government.
  • analyze the role of ethnicity, ethnocentrism, and/or racism in shaping the ethnic experience of Native Americans.

ANTH 335 Research Methods in Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:ANTH 300 or 310 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:IGETC Area 4
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces research methods for the field of anthropology. It emphasizes familiarization with specific observational research methods and the practical application of these methods in a contemporary setting. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • conduct qualitative observational research on both human and non-human primates
  • distinguish the participant-observation method from other observational methodologies
  • formulate a testable hypothesis
  • measure outcomes that support or refute a hypothesis by creating research applications in field settings
  • distinguish an ethogram from an ethnography
  • analyze patterns in research data

ANTH 336 Anthropology of Sex, Sexuality and Gender

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; CSU Area D3; IGETC Area 4A
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course is an introductory overview from a global anthropological perspective of the relationship between sexual behavior and sexuality as well as gender and other socially ascribed statuses. Diverse modern and past human and non-human primate communities are compared bio-culturally. Integrating the basic branches of anthropology -- cultural, biological, linguistic and archaeological anthropology -- the course examines the role, function, and evolution of sex in the human primate. It examines the relationship between sex, sexuality, gender to adaptation as well as to social behavior and to cultural variation. The implications of research methodologies and theory in investigating sex, sexuality, culture and biology are evaluated.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain and synthesize the goals, methods and distinctive features of the discipline of anthropology.
  • predict general ethical concerns in anthropological research.
  • evaluate specific ethical dilemmas in anthropological research on sex, sexuality and gender.
  • apply linguistic anthropology concepts to the study of sex, sexuality and gender.
  • describe the range of variations in sexual norms across primate species and cross-culturally across human societies.
  • analyze the difference between genetic/biological/essentialist definitions of gender and cultural ascriptions of genders.
  • compare and contrast sexual selection hypotheses and evolutionary adaptation hypotheses about both specific, non-human primate sexual traits or behavior and human sexual traits or behaviors.
  • evaluate the successes and limitations of reconstructing prehistoric gendered or sexuality phenomena.
  • deconstruct a current topical issue in the anthropology of sex, sexuality and gender.
  • recount core theoretical claims about sex, sexuality and gender in the behavioral sciences with special reference to the anthropological perspective and contribution.
  • review changes in the role of gender or sexual identities in anthropology as a profession.

ANTH 341 Introduction to Linguistics

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area II(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 130
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This introductory course serves as a foundation for understanding language from an anthropological perspective. It addresses such core questions as how, what, when, where, why, and with whom humans communicate. The course topics are formed along three core areas:
(1) structural linguistics, which include phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics;
(2) historical linguistics, which include language origin and evolution, structural change, and language genetics; and
(3) sociocultural linguistics, which include child and adult language acquisition, and cultural and psychological constraints within the context of linguistic ethnography.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate an understanding of anthropological linguistics, methods, and theory.
  • evaluate in cross-cultural perspective how paralanguage and nonverbal communication alter and enhance social communication in humans, as well as in non-human primates.
  • describe the biocultural origins of language and the development of language over time.
  • interpret language using structural linguistic techniques.
  • recognize the dynamic interrelationship between language and culture, including their acquisition.
  • examine the relevance of language in sociocultural issues.
  • assess factors and consequences of language change and extinction.

ANTH 370 Primatology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ANTH 300
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an analysis of nonhuman primate comparative morphology, behavior, and ecology. Areas of study include general primate morphology, diet and ecology, behavior including reproduction and social systems, cognition and intelligence, and primate conservation issues. Primates in both captive and free-ranging settings are examined. Field trips for primate observations may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare the physical characteristics of the three major categories of nonhuman primates: prosimians, monkeys, and apes
  • describe the different social and mating systems of nonhuman primates
  • relate various behavioral patterns with the specific ecology associated with these nonhuman primates
  • critique current conservation strategies for primates in captivity and in the wild to determine viability

ANTH 372 Primatology Field Studies

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ANTH 300 and 480; AND eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides practical experience in non-human primate observational studies. The Sacramento Zoo serves as the field site where observations on non-human primates are conducted. Focus is on training in research methodology and observational techniques. Field trips to the Sacramento Zoo are required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • collect behavioral observations on non-human primates
  • differentiate behaviors of non-human primates and establish an ethogram
  • contrast the behavior of captive with wild non-human primates
  • distinguish characteristics of individual non-human primates
  • apply different research designs in observational methodology

ANTH 391 Life and Culture Study Abroad

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:The student must complete the pre-enrollment process into the Los Rios Community College District Study Abroad program as required by the American Institute for Foreign Studies (AIFS).
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course allows students to acquire a level of global competence while enrolled in the Los Rios Study Abroad program. Global competence is a continuing process of acquiring specific economic, historical, and geopolitical knowledge, which supports the intercultural communication skills and authentic lived experiences that allow a person to function in another culture, and result in attitudes of cultural appreciation and interdependence. While participating in a specific Study Abroad program the student will have opportunities to study and generally survey the host country's historical, cultural, and geopolitical influences, as well as the societal structures, to develop an understanding and appreciation of the host culture as different from U. S. American culture. Students may find information about the pre-enrollment meetings at the Study Abroad website, located at: http://www.arc.losrios.edu/Study_Abroad.htm

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify aspects of social, physical, and/or emotional well-being for the local community students are studying in, while considering present and future conditions in societies across the globe.
  • incorporate specific cultural, geopolitical, economic, and social knowledge into academic and personal contexts for an understanding of global competence.
  • analyze personal beliefs, values, and attitudes about the host culture that the student had prior to an intercultural experience and aspects of ethnocentric behavior that can occur within intercultural communication and relations.
  • demonstrate an understanding of concepts of physical and emotional wellness to make wise lifestyle choices and develop these skills and competencies to understand oneself as a whole person (integral to one's environment).
  • identify and explain aspects of culture shock and techniques to cope with and reduce its effects on physical and emotional wellness.
  • describe the value of international travel as a part of lifelong learning and personal wellness.
  • undertake thoughtful consideration of divergent points of view and utilize multiple perspectives in considering information.
  • develop a foundation for cultural pluralism, a rejection of previous personal prejudices, and knowledge of and comfort with others unlike one’s self.
  • participate in the larger community beyond campus in a positive manner demonstrating an understanding of personal responsibility in the larger context.

ANTH 480 Honors Biological Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Eligibility for the Honors Program.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC (ANTH 300 & 480 combined: maximum credit - one course)
  • General Education:AA/AS Area IV; CSU Area B2; IGETC Area 5B
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the science of biological anthropology. It is a seminar-style honors course which approaches the topical material through class discussion which encourages problem solving techniques focusing on current anthropological issues. Weekly topical issues are presented in a case study format. Critical thinking skills are emphasized in responding to these issues. Topics include evolutionary theory, heredity, human variation, taxonomy and behavior of the living primates, and the fossil evidence of human evolution. This course differs from ANTH 300 in that it is offered as a seminar-style class with an emphasis on academic journal articles. This course is not open to students who have completed ANTH 300.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the nature and origins of the science of biological anthropology
  • identify the evidence that supports the evolution, genetics, and heredity of the human species
  • critique diverse hypotheses presented to explain human evolution
  • assess the diversity of living primates and describe how the study of these animals helps scientists understand human evolution
  • describe the fossil record evidence for human evolution
  • explain the current hypotheses and factors that are relevant to understanding human evolution
  • identify the nature and causes of human diversity
  • define problem-solving techniques applicable to current issues relevant to biological anthropology
  • synthesize anthropological concepts from primary reading sources
  • critique theories regarding human behavioral ecology and the continuing influence of human activity on the environment

ANTH 481 Honors Cultural Anthropology

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:Placement into ENGWR 480 through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D1; IGETC Area 4A
  • C-ID:C-ID ANTH 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to the various customs, traditions, and forms of social organization in both Western and non-Western societies. Multicultural perspectives are examined for such topics as subsistence methods, belief and religious systems, linguistics, trade and economic systems, arts, kinship systems, marriage and family systems, technology, and changes due to internal and external forces. This seminar-style honors course approaches the topical material through class discussion which encourages problem-solving techniques focusing on current anthropological issues. This course is not open to students who have completed ANTH 310.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the 4-field nature of anthropology and the importance of fieldwork in the discipline
  • explain how the history and development of cultural anthropology as a discipline has affected its current theoretical perspectives
  • generalize the relationship between subsistence patterns and their impact on other aspects of culture such as marriage, religion, and political and social organization
  • analyze and interpret kinship charts
  • identify the role of enculturation in personality development and in the interpretation of gender and gender roles
  • assess global trends of socio-cultural change in the areas of economic and social development
  • analyze cross-cultural examples of ethnic conflict and ethnic identity
  • compare the contributions and social experiences of non-Western, non-Eurocentric cultures
  • identify the consequences of ethnocentrism and/or racism on social interactions
  • assess the impact of cultural diversity on cross-cultural interaction
  • apply the concepts of cultural anthropology in daily life

ANTH 494 Topics in Anthropology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:18 - 54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or 103, and ENGRD 116; OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320; OR placement through assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a concentrated study of current anthropological issues. Topics reflect contemporary issues and problems in the four traditional fields as well as an applied approach where appropriate. Issues in the area of physical anthropology are approached from a biological and ecological perspective; issues in cultural anthropology, linguistics, and archaeology are approached from a multi-cultural and international platform.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and evaluate contemporary anthropological issues as they relate to human biology and culture
  • recognize the dynamic nature of the field of anthropology
  • evaluate contemporary issues from an anthropological perspective
  • demonstrate an awareness of and an appreciation for our increasingly diverse population
  • evaluate the effects of the biological or cultural past on current issues

ANTH 495 Independent Studies in Anthropology

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Hours:54 - 162 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Independent Study is an opportunity for the student to extend classroom experience in this subject, while working independently of a formal classroom situation. Independent study is an extension of work offered in a specific class in the college catalog. To be eligible for independent study, students must have completed the basic regular catalog course at American River College. They must also discuss the study with a professor in this subject and secure approval. Only one independent study for each catalog course will be allowed.