Administration of Justice

Administration of Justice (ADMJ)

ADMJ 300 Introduction to Administration of Justice

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ELSR 340 AND ELSW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 110
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the characteristics of the American criminal justice system, U.S. Constitutional Rights, criminal activity, crime causation, domestic and international criminal threats, law enforcement response to criminal activity, and future law enforcement trends. It emphasizes the components of the American justice system, due process, courts and correctional services, ethics, and leadership.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • research the history, structure, and function of law enforcement, courts, and correctional systems in the United States.
  • explain the interaction between law enforcement, courts, and correctional systems.
  • explain due process and the protections provided by the U.S. Constitution.
  • analyze ethical decision making and leadership ability.
  • explain crime and criminality using criminological theories.
  • explain the methods, theories, and concepts associated with the sources of crime data, the emerging patterns of criminal activity, and the costs of crime.
  • describe the extent of the crime problem in America.

ADMJ 301 Investigative Report Writing

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESL 340
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides techniques of writing facts, information, and ideas effectively in a simple, clear, and logical manner in the various types of criminal justice system reports. It emphasizes criminal justice terminology, organization of information, investigative note taking, and thorough documentation of witness statements and evidence.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze and organize data for use in report writing.
  • write a report communicating facts and ideas in a simple, clear, and logical manner.
  • use vocabulary commonly used in the criminal justice system.
  • take notes in an interview or interrogation situation in a logical and organized manner.
  • discuss police ethical responsibilities and mandatory reporting requirements.

ADMJ 302 Community Relations: Multicultural Issues

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ELSR 340 AND ELSW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area D3; CSU Area D7
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 160
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the complex, dynamic relationship between communities and the institutions of the justice system in addressing crime and conflict with an emphasis on the challenges and prospects of administering justice within a diverse, multicultural population. It addresses the role that race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social class, culture, and the criminal justice professional play in shaping these relationships. It also examines new strategies, skills, tools, and cultural knowledge necessary for personnel engaged in all aspects of the criminal justice system. Special topics include how terrorism and the need for homeland security have changed the dynamics of police-community relations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze how community perceptions of the justice system have evolved historically.
  • formulate ways in which law enforcement professionals should respond to multicultural communities with a greater need for consideration, sensitivity, and improved communication skills.
  • describe the changing law enforcement agency, including ethnic and racial issues within the workforce and women in law enforcement.
  • describe the impact of cultural diversity on law enforcement’s duty to combat terrorism and maintain homeland security.
  • examine emerging strategies, roles, and technologies for peace officers in multicultural law enforcement.
  • describe the impact multiculturalism has on the courts and corrections.

ADMJ 304 Juvenile Delinquency

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ELSR 340 AND ELSW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D0
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 220
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines juvenile delinquency from a variety of perspectives, including the concept of delinquency, theories of delinquency, social, community, and environmental influences on delinquency and the juvenile justice system (past and present). An overview of adolescent problems and current approaches being utilized to confront these problems is discussed. It examines a variety of the causes of juvenile delinquency, as well as suggestions for the treatment of delinquency at both the state and local levels. It also examines the nature and extent of delinquency with relation to gender differences, family dynamics, peer and gang groups, schools, drug use, and the juvenile justice courts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate the many diverse views and perspectives that characterize the study of juvenile delinquency.
  • analyze the balance of theory, law, policy, and practice as they relate to juvenile delinquency.
  • examine the concept of delinquency and status offending, the measurement of delinquency, and the trends and patterns in the delinquency rate.
  • assess the merits of the various theoretical models that have been used to explain the onset of delinquent behavior with a focus on choice, biology, psychology, economic, cultural, and environmental influences affecting delinquency.
  • explain the various treatment approaches utilized to curb the onset of delinquency.
  • examine juvenile delinquency abroad and compare how juvenile justice systems in other nations compare with the system in the United States.
  • describe how gender differences, peer groups, family dynamics, schools, drug use, and abuse impact delinquency rates.

ADMJ 309 Career Preparation for Law Enforcement Occupations

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for students who are pursuing careers in law enforcement and corrections. It covers employment and career search techniques, application processes, resume development, and cover letter writing. This course prepares students for pre-employment testing, interviews, background investigations, polygraph examinations, medical screening, conditional job offers, and hiring processes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • research the current law enforcement labor market and develop job search skills.
  • generate a completed law enforcement employment application package, including resume and cover letter.
  • describe the complexity and thoroughness of the law enforcement background investigation process and identify potential career disqualifiers.
  • accurately complete the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training personal history statement documents.
  • demonstrate ethical decision making and leadership ability.

ADMJ 320 Concepts of Criminal Law

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area V(b); CSU Area D8; IGETC Area 4H
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 120
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the philosophy and structure of criminal law in the United States. Special emphasis is placed on the classification of crime, the general elements of crime, the definitions of common and statutory law, and the nature of acceptable evidence. It utilizes case studies to introduce students to criminal law and the classification of crimes against persons, property, morals, and public welfare. It also includes discussion of prosecution and defense decision making, criminal culpability, and defenses to crimes.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • research the philosophical and historical evolution of criminal law.
  • explain the adversary system and sources of criminal law.
  • identify elements of offenses against the person, property, morals, and public welfare.
  • analyze a criminal court case and identify elements of offenses and criminal defenses applicable to the case.
  • classify crimes according to severity.
  • explain capacity to commit crime, causation, and culpability.
  • examine the effects of ethical conduct of government officials and the relationship to the enforcement of criminal laws.

ADMJ 322 Criminal Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 122
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an in-depth study of criminal procedures used to enforce substantive law at both the federal and state level. Every step of the criminal process, from arrest to appeal, is thoroughly explored.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • list each step in the criminal justice process from arrest to trial.
  • analyze the roles played by prosecutors, criminal defense attorneys, and judges in the criminal justice process.
  • distinguish between the authority, jurisdiction, and organization of state and federal courts.

ADMJ 323 Legal Aspects of Evidence

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 124
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the origins, development, philosophy, and constitutional foundations of the rules of evidence as applied in United States law. Emphasis is placed on the types of evidence and the laws governing admissibility of evidence into criminal procedures. Topics include search and seizure, hearsay evidence, witness competency, and direct and circumstantial evidence.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish between direct and circumstantial evidence and explain the impact that each has on a criminal procedure.
  • recognize situations where a search warrant is required.
  • distinguish among different types of evidence.
  • identify the laws governing the admissibility of evidence into a criminal procedure.
  • analyze the laws of search and seizure.
  • critically evaluate and apply the rules of evidence to specific case facts.
  • identify circumstances when a search warrant is not required.

ADMJ 330 Criminal Investigation

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 140
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces basic investigative responsibilities and procedures as applied to criminal investigations. Topics include crime scene management, forensic and physical evidence handling, search and seizure, property crimes, violent crimes, organized criminal enterprises, gangs, and domestic and international terrorist organizations.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify basic investigative responsibilities, including note taking, photographic documentation, preserving and processing evidence, and crime scene sketching.
  • identify and explain the role of documentation in the criminal investigative process.
  • recognize, identify, and explain the implications of a given piece of evidence in a criminal process.
  • identify critical ethical issues related to criminal investigation.
  • identify procedures for first responders to crime scenes.
  • describe successive evolutionary stages of the criminal investigative process.
  • describe the duties related to the basic functions of crime scene management including control, searching, evidence processing, and general area investigation.
  • identify the role of forensic examination in a criminal investigative process.
  • compare and contrast the legalities and strategies of interview and interrogation.
  • research the protections granted under the fourth amendment to the U.S. Constitution including various exceptions to the rule.
  • analyze activities of criminal enterprise organizations, criminal gangs, and terrorist organizations.
  • identify key information sources and data systems available to investigators.
  • explain the role of the investigator in the judicial process.

ADMJ 331 Patrol Procedures

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course explores the early development and present-day role of patrol operations and techniques used by local law enforcement agencies. Major topics include community policing, effective patrol strategies, gang awareness, and key factors affecting deployment of patrol resources, such as community involvement and meeting department objectives.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the patrol division organization in a law enforcement agency
  • analyze the rules governing a patrol officer's conduct
  • differentiate the techniques and methods used by the police to cope with the situations encountered while on patrol

ADMJ 340 Introduction to Correctional Services

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU
  • C-ID:C-ID AJ 200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an overview of the history and trends of adult and juvenile corrections including probation and parole. It focuses on the legal issues, specific laws, and general operation of correctional institutions. The relationship between corrections and other components of the judicial system is examined.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the history of corrections and explain current trends within corrections.
  • research the legal issues, specific laws, and general issues encountered in a corrections facility.
  • explain the relationship between corrections and other components of the administration of justice system.
  • distinguish between adult and juvenile corrections, probation, and parole.