Public Safety

Firefighting Training Center (FIRE)

FIRE 1084 Wildfire Powersaws Refresher (S-212)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:8 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to refresh and re-certify chain saw operators in the job performance requirements of the wildfire power saw operator position in the Incident Command System and on the fire ground. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate chain saw maintenance procedures and use of tool repair kit.
  • describe proper tree felling and bucking procedures.
  • demonstrate proper tree bucking and felling procedures.
  • assess a standing tree with limbs near the ground in a closed stand of timber and properly size-up, clear work area, and limb the tree.
  • assess a brush field and properly size-up, cut, and remove a strip of brush to near ground level, 6 feet wide (1.8 m) and 20 feet long (6.1m).
  • demonstrate the use of all personal protective equipment.

FIRE 1100 Fire Control 3A (Structural Fire Fighting in Acquired Structures)

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:1 hours LEC; 15 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1100) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to develop fundamental skills in combating structure fires by providing the students with a thorough understanding of structural fire attack, utilizing an acquired structure. Topics include fire behavior, ventilation, interior attack, and exterior attack. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in fire behavior.
  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in ventilation techniques.
  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in interior fire attack methods.
  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in exterior fire attack methods.

FIRE 1101 Fire Control 3B (Structural Fire Fighting in Live-fire Simulators)

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:1 hours LEC; 15 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1101) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to develop fundamental skills in combating structure fires by providing the students with a thorough understanding of structural fire attack, utilizing a live-fire simulator. Topics include fire behavior, ventilation, interior attack, and exterior attack. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in fire behavior.
  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in ventilation techniques.
  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in interior fire attack methods.
  • employ hands-on fire fighting experience in exterior fire attack methods.

FIRE 1102 Fire Control 4 (Controlling Ignitable Liquids and Gases)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:6.5 hours LEC; 9.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1600
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1102) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge and skills that prepare a firefighter to extinguish an ignitable liquid fire, control a flammable gas fire, and develop an incident action plan for a pipeline emergency. Topics include ignitable liquid fires, flammable gas fires, pipeline emergencies, and skills exercises. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • operate as a member of a team to extinguish an ignitable liquid fire by identifying escape routes and safety zones prior to advancing, selecting the correct type of foam concentrate for the given fuel and conditions, applying a properly proportioned foam stream to the surface of the fuel to create and maintain a foam blanket, extinguishing the fire, preventing re-ignition, maintaining team protection, and facing hazards until the team successfully retreats to a safety zone.
  • operate as a member of a team to control a flammable gas cylinder fire by maintaining crew integrity, identifying contents, identifying escape routes and safety zones prior to advancing, closing any open valves, and extinguishing flames only when leaking gas is eliminated, the cylinder is cooled, cylinder integrity is evaluated, hazardous conditions are recognized and acted upon, and the cylinder is faced during approach and retreat.
  • identify pipeline regulations in accordance with state and federal requirements.

FIRE 1130 Company Officer 2A (Human Resource Management for Company Officers)

  • Units:1.75
  • Hours:33 hours LEC; 7 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1507 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on the use of human resources to accomplish assignments, evaluate member performance, supervise personnel, and integrate health and safety plans, policies, and procedures into daily activities as well as the emergency scene. Topics include human resource management, and health and safety. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply and follow human resource policies and procedures, given an administrative situation requiring action.
  • create a professional development plan for a member of the organization, providing the individual with the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities to maintain or advance professional development, given the requirements for promotion and opportunities for a member’s professional development.

FIRE 1131 Company Officer 2B (General Administration Functions for Company Officers)

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:15 hours LEC; 5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1507 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on general administrative functions and the implementation of department policies and procedures and addresses conveying the fire department's role, image, and mission to the public. Topics include administration, and community and government relations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the impact of state and federal laws and regulations as they apply to the company officer to reduce the risk and civil and criminal liability, given a list of state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to fire service supervisors.
  • explain the benefits to the organization and the purpose for establishing cooperative external agency relationships, given a specific problem or issue in the community and a list of local, statewide, and national resources.

FIRE 1132 Company Officer 2C (Fire Inspections and Investigation for Company Officers)

  • Units:1.75
  • Hours:33 hours LEC; 7 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1507 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on conducting inspections, identifying hazards and addressing violations, performing a fire investigation to determine preliminary cause, and securing the incident scene and preserving evidence. Topics include orientation, fire and life safety inspections, and fire investigation. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the procedures for conducting fire inspections, identifying all hazards, including hazardous materials; completing approved forms; and initiating approved follow up action, given the policies of the agency.
  • employ measures to secure and incident scene with recognizable perimeters, which keep unauthorized persons from restricted areas, and which protect all evidence or potential evidence from damage or destruction.

FIRE 1133 Company Officer 2D (All-Risk Operations for Company Officers)

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:20 hours LEC; 20 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1507 and 1602 with grades of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Completion of Incident Command System (I-200), which is an online course offered by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on conducting incident size-up, developing and implementing an initial plan of action involving single and multiunit operations for various types of emergency incidents to mitigate the situation following agency safety procedures, conducting preincident planning, and develop and conduct a post-incident analysis. Topics include initial Incident Action Plan (IAP), postincident analysis, operational planning, and service demands. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • develop an initial plan of action, identifying the resources required to control the emergency.
  • implement a plan of action at a simulated emergency operation, deploying resources to mitigate the situation.
  • develop and conduct a post incident analysis, identifying and communicating all required critical elements and completing and processing the approved forms in accordance with policies and procedures.
  • identify elements of operational plans, obtaining required resources and their assignments, mitigating the incident.
  • write a report identifying the major causes for service demands for various planning areas within the organization's service area.

FIRE 1134 Company Officer 2E (Wildland Incident Operations for Company Officers)

  • Units:1.75
  • Hours:28 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FFS 1541, FIRE 1133, and FIRE 1507 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on evaluating and reporting incident conditions, analyzing incident needs, developing and implementing a plan of action to deploy incident resources completing all operations to suppress a wildland fire, establishing an incident command post, creating and incident action plan, and completing incident records and reports. Topics include report on conditions, ongoing incident conditions, establishing an incident command post, deploying resources, incident needs, suppression operations, personnel needs and issues, and incident records and reports. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • employ information regarding travel route, assignment, time needed, and point of contact from dispatch.
  • develop an initial report on conditions that communicates required incident information.
  • demonstrate the ability to size up an incident to formulate an incident action plan that sets incident objectives and applies strategies and tactics according to agency policy, using an Incident Command System (ICS) 201 Incident Briefing form.
  • evaluate incident conditions, identify progress, changes in fuels, topography, weather, fire behavior, personnel safety, and other significant events, and communicate these conditions to the supervisor and to assigned and adjoining personnel.
  • determine a incident command post.
  • describe proper emergency medical procedures.
  • deploy resources to suppress a wildland fire, taking appropriate suppression actions and ensuring personnel safety.
  • describe ways to update supervisors, crew members, and adjoining personnel.
  • analyze incident needs.
  • describe how to provide for assigned resources' needs.
  • describe information needed for the transfer of command and complete this process.
  • describe wildland fire suppression operations.
  • describe the needs of personnel.
  • demonstrate how to maintain wildland incident records.
  • prepare final incident reports.

FIRE 1140 Chief Fire Officer 3A: Human Resources Management

  • Units:1
  • Hours:16.25 hours LEC; 9.75 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet the educational requirements for Company Officer, or seeking Fire Marshal Certification.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the human resources requirements related to the roles and responsibilities of a chief fire officer. Topics include developing plans for providing employee accommodation,
developing hiring procedures, establishing personnel assignments, describing methods of facilitating and encouraging professional development, developing an ongoing education training program, developing promotion
procedures, developing proposals for improving employee benefits, and developing a measurable accident and injury prevention program. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process for chief fire officer.
  • identify the prerequisite qualifications, and the human resource management, community and government relations, administrative, inspection and investigation, emergency service delivery, health and safety, and emergency management duties of a chief fire officer.
  • identify the prerequisite knowledge and mobilization and suppression duties of a wildland fire officer II.
  • develop a plan for providing an employee accommodation, including adequate information to justify the requested change(s).
  • develop procedures for hiring members, ensuring a valid and reliable process.
  • establish personnel assignments, maximizing efficiency in accordance with policies and procedures.
  • define the requirements of the California Firefighters Procedural Bill of Rights Act as they apply to the roles and responsibilities of the chief fire officer.
  • describe methods of facilitating and encouraging members to participate in professional development to achieve their personal and professional goals.
  • develop an ongoing education training program, giving members of the organization appropriate training to meet the mission of the organization.
  • develop procedures and programs for promoting members, ensuring a valid, reliable, job-related, and nondiscriminatory process.
  • develop a proposal for improving an employee benefit, including adequate information to justify the requested benefit improvement.
  • develop a measurable accident and injury prevention program, evaluating results to determine program effectiveness.

FIRE 1141 Chief Fire Officer 3B: Budget and Fiscal Responsibilities

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9.5 hours LEC; 8.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet the educational requirements for Company Officer.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with a basic knowledge of the budgeting requirements related to the roles and responsibilities of a Chief Fire Officer. Topics include developing a budget management system, developing a division or departmental budget, and describing the process for ensuring competitive bidding. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process for chief fire officer.
  • develop a budget management system to keep the division or department within the budgetary authority.
  • develop a divisional or departmental budget, determining and justifying capital, operating, and personnel costs.
  • describe the agency's process for ensuring competitive bidding, including developing requests for proposal (RFPs) and soliciting and awarding bids.

FIRE 1142 Chief Fire Officer 3C: General Administration Functions for Chief Fire Officers

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:14 hours LEC; 10 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet the educational requirements for Company Officer.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a basic knowledge of the administration requirements related to the roles and responsibilities of a Chief Fire Officer. Topics include directing a department record management system, analyzing and interpreting records and data, developing a model plan for continuous organizational improvement, developing a plan to facilitate approval, preparing community awareness programs, and evaluating the inspection program of the Agency Having Jurisdiction (AHJ). Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify different levels in the Executive Chief Officer certification track, the courses and requirements for Chief Fire Officer certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • direct the development, maintenance, and evaluation of a department record management system, ensuring the achievement of completeness and accuracy.
  • analyze and interpret records and data to determine validity and recommend improvements.
  • develop a model plan for continuous organizational improvement, maximizing resource utilization.
  • develop a plan to facilitate approval for a new program, piece of legislation, form of public education, or fire safety code.
  • develop a community risk reduction program to meet desired program outcomes.
  • evaluate the inspection program of the AHJ, assessing results to determine effectiveness.

FIRE 1143 Chief Fire Officer 3D: Emergency Service Delivery Responsibilities

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:12.5 hours LEC; 11.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet the educational requirements for Company Officer.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides basic knowledge of the emergency service requirements related to the roles and responsibilities of a Chief Fire Officer. Topics include developing a plan for the integration of fire services resources, developing an agency resource contingency plan, evaluating incident facilities, supervising multiple resources, developing and utilizing an incident action plan, obtaining incident information to facilitate transfer of command, developing and conducting a post-incident analysis, and maintaining incident records. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process for chief fire officer.
  • develop a plan for integrating fire services resources in the community's emergency management plan, ensuring that the role of the fire service complies with local, state/provincial, and national requirements.
  • develop a plan for the agency to ensure the mission of the organization is performed in times of extraordinary need.
  • evaluate the need for and location of incident facilities, so that the location is correctly sited, clearly identified, and communicated to personnel.
  • employ multiple resources and deploy them in accordance with the incident action plan and agency policies and procedures.
  • prepare, review, validate, modify, and document an incident action plan for each operational period, determining, assigning, and placing the required resources to mitigate the incident, and applying strategies and tactics according to agency policies and procedures and incident objectives.
  • obtain incident information from the outgoing incident commander to ensure the new incident commander has the information necessary to operate and complete the transfer of command.
  • develop and conduct a post-incident analysis in order to identify and communicate all required critical elements, and complete and process appropriate forms in accordance with policies and procedures.
  • maintain incident records to document required information.

FIRE 1150 Executive Chief Fire Officer: Human Resource Management

  • Units:1
  • Hours:19 hours LEC; 9 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet educational requirements for Chief Fire Officer
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the skills and knowledge needed to perform his/her duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topics include selection and placement of human resources, development of a positive and participative member/management program, establishment and evaluation of a list of education and in-service training goals, appraisal of a member assistance program, and the evaluation of an incentive program to determine if the desired results are achieved. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the different levels of Company Officer certification, the courses and requirements for Executive Chief Fire Officer certification, and be able to describe the capstone task book and testing process.
  • identify administrate job performance requirements and evaluate and improve the department, according to the specified job performance requirements.
  • determine effective recruitment, selection, and placement of human resources according to the law and consistent with current best practices.
  • initiate the development of a positive and participative member/management program.
  • establish and evaluate a list of education and inservice training goals so that all members can achieve and maintain required proficiencies.
  • appraise a member assistance program to determine if the program produces the desired results and benefits.
  • evaluate an incentive program to determine if the desired results are achieved.

FIRE 1151 Executive Chief Fire Officer: Community and Government Relations

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:6.5 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet educational requirements for Chief Fire Officer
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the skills and knowledge needed to perform his/her duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topics include assuming a leadership role in community events. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the different levels of Company Officer certification, the courses and requirements for Executive Chief Fire Officer certification, and be able to describe the capstone task book and testing process.
  • identify how to project a positive image of the fire department to the community, per the specified job performance requirements.
  • identify a leadership role in community events in order to understand and respond to community needs and enhance the image of the organization.

FIRE 1152 Executive Chief Fire Officer: Administration

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:21.5 hours LEC; 9 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet educational requirements for Chief Fire Officer
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the skills and knowledge needed to perform one's duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topics include developing a comprehensive, long-range plan, evaluating and projecting training requirements, assessing facility and building needs, completing a written comprehensive risk, hazard, and value analysis, and developing a plan for a capital improvement project or program. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the different levels of Company Officer certification, the courses and requirements for Executive Chief Fire Officer certification, and be able to describe the capstone task book and testing process.
  • develop a comprehensive, long-range plan to meet the projected needs of the community.
  • compile a written comprehensive risk, hazard, and value analysis of the community so that an accurate evaluation is made for service delivery decision making.
  • develop a plan for a capital improvement project or program to educate citizens about organization needs.

FIRE 1153 Executive Chief Fire Officer: Emergency Services Delivery

  • Units:2
  • Hours:35.5 hours LEC; 3 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet educational requirements for Chief Fire Officer
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the skills and knowledge needed to perform his/her duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topics include developing a comprehensive disaster plan and a comprehensive plan for the organization to operate at a civil disturbance. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the different levels of Company Officer certification, the courses and requirements for Executive Chief Fire Officer certification, and be able to describe the capstone task book and testing process.
  • develop a comprehensive disaster plan that integrates other organizations’ resources in order to rapidly and effectively mitigate the impacts on a community.
  • develop a comprehensive plan for the organization to operate at a civil disturbance, integrate with other organizations’ actions, and provide for the safety and protection of members.

FIRE 1154 Executive Chief Fire Officer: Health and Safety

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:11.5 hours LEC; 3 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Meet educational requirements for Chief Fire Officer
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the skills and knowledge needed to perform his/her duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topic include maintaining, developing, and providing leadership for a risk management program. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the different levels of Company Officer certification, the courses and requirements for Executive Chief Fire Officer certification, and be able to describe the capstone task book and testing process.
  • identify, maintain, develop, and provide leadership for a risk management program to reduce injuries and property damage accidents.

FIRE 1160 Incident Management of Major Fires

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 24 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FFS 1510 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the knowledge, skills, and abilities for those who are responsible for command and control of dynamic and complex fireground emergencies. Topics include assuming command, situational awareness and risk assessment process, Incident Action Plan (IAP), incident organization, accountability and command worksheets, continuing, transferring, and terminating command, and simulations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the components of the process of assuming command of an incident.
  • employ improved situational awareness, and identify the risk assessment process.
  • identify an effective communications plan.
  • develop and implement an Incident Action Plan (IAP).
  • develop an effective incident organization to assemble, coordinate, and control tactical resources, allowing for expansion based on complexity of the incident.
  • initiate and maintain accountability throughout the event at all levels and initiate a command worksheet.
  • demonstrate how to continue, transfer, and terminate command.

FIRE 1161 Incident Management of High-Rise Fires

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:20.5 hours LEC; 19.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1133 and 1160 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides knowledge, skills, and abilities required for those managing incidents occurring in large, multistory buildings. These incidents may present significant management, logistical, and safety challenges to emergency personnel. The size and complexity of the interior spaces; limited, sometimes arduous access; extended travel and response times; and the concentrated occupant load with egress challenges, all contribute to the problems faced by emergency responders. Additionally, most high-rise structures are equipped with various environmental, fire protection, and life-safety systems that require support and control. Successful emergency operations in these types of buildings also require preplanning and technical competence on the part of the emergency responders. Topics include identifying critical factors and hazards, identifying construction and fire-protection features, response roles and responsibilities, development and multi-division/group response roles and responsibilities, development and multi-branch response roles and responsibilities, and assessing and using fire and life-safety systems. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the construction and fire-protection features based upon the age and occupancy type of a high-rise building.
  • describe the elements of the incident command system’s modular development and the roles and responsibilities for initial response.
  • describe the elements of the incident command system’s modular development and the roles and responsibilities for multi-division/group (reinforced) response.
  • describe the elements of the incident command system’s modular development and the roles and responsibilities for multi-branch (extended) response.
  • describe the fire and life-safety systems based upon the age and occupancy type of the building.

FIRE 1162 Incident Management of the Fire Fighter Emergency

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:9 hours LEC; 15 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1133 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:Completion of Incident Command System (I-200), which is an online course offered by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides incident management terminology and methodology that is employed during a fire fighter emergency. Topics include functions of command, critical incident factors, warning signs of a Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC) deployment, duties of the RIC, command procedures of the emergency, and post deployment considerations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the eight functions/standards of command.
  • identify critical incident factors.
  • identify the warning signs of a pending RIC deployment.
  • identify the duties of the RIC.
  • employ the incident command procedures to address the fire fighter emergency.
  • employ the RIC division/group/division's procedures to address the fire fighter emergency.
  • describe the post-deployment considerations.

FIRE 1221 Fire Prevention 1B

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1220 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on specific codes, ordinances and statutes that pertain to fire prevention practices in California. Topics include building construction, occupancy requirements, evacuation procedures, fire hazards, safety devices, inspection reports, fire detection and alarm systems. Credit/No Credit Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the relationships of fire protection and life safety to building construction and furnishings
  • Analyze and compute occupancy loads and egress requirements
  • Assess and compare the operation readiness of two different types of sprinkler systems and list the common problems
  • Assess and compare the operational readiness of a wet and dry standpipe system and list the common problems
  • Validate the readiness of detection and alarm systems
  • Classify fire hazards and safety devices

FIRE 1222 Fire Prevention 1C

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1221 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on the special hazards associated with flammable and combustible liquids and gases. Topics of discussion include bulk flammable liquid and gas storage, extinguishing flammable liquid and gas fires, and transportation of flammable liquids and gases. Credit/No Credit Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Classify the physical properties of flammable liquids and gases, combustible liquids and compressed gases
  • Generate guidelines on the storage and handling of flammable liquids and gases
  • Assess the installation of storage tanks and containers for flammable liquids and gases
  • Implement the techniques for fire extinguishing of flammable liquids and gases
  • Evaluate information relative to the Department of Transportation (DOT), labeling and placarding system
  • Identify those regulations governing the transportation of flammable liquids and gases
  • Define the procedures for controlling compressed and liquefied gas leaks
  • Question procedures relative to the transfer of compressed and liquefied gases

FIRE 1500 Firefighter Academy

  • Units:14 - 15
  • Hours:137 - 140 hours LEC; 363 - 419 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Public Safety First Aid and CPR per California Health and Safety code 1797.182 or equivalent
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge necessary to assume the role of firefighter with the ability to work effectively and safely within a fire agency. Topics include indoctrination into the fire service, firefighter health and safety, self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), emergency scene operations, ropes and knots, hand and power tools, building construction and related hazards, fire behavior, fire hose use and maintenance, ground ladder operations, forcible entry, structural search and rescue operations, structural firefighting operations, ventilation techniques, overhaul, firefighter survival, wildland firefighting techniques, tools and equipment, hazardous materials, and weapons of mass destruction.
This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1090 prior to September 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the role of a firefighter in a fire department, identify the mission of the fire service, follow standard operating procedures and rules and regulations of the fire department, and access the department’s member assistance program
  • identify common types of accidents and injuries, maintain a healthy and physically fit lifestyle, and follow life safety initiatives in the line of duty
  • demonstrate use of a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) during emergency operations, correctly don SCBA within 60 seconds, demonstrate emergency techniques and procedures if the self-contained breathing apparatus fails, recognize low-air warnings, and exit hazardous areas prior to air depletion
  • set up operations in work areas at emergency scenes, follow procedures, wear protective equipment, establish safe protected work areas as directed and perform assigned tasks in protected work areas
  • demonstrate the following knots; Overhand, Half Hitch, Clove Hitch, Beckett Bend, Bowline, Figure 8, Water, and Handcuff
  • specify the maintenance, operations and use of a variety of hand and power tools. Describe the differences between two-and four-stroke engines and how they are identified
  • describe common building materials, various construction types, and identify dangerous building conditions created by fire
  • identify dangerous fire behavior conditions and describe mitigation needed to ensure firefighter safety
  • arrange fire hose on a fire engine according to its use and type, place nozzles on attack lines, and inspect, maintain, and place hose in or out of service after evaluating its condition
  • deploy ground ladders, assess hazards, ensure ladders are stable and their angles are correct for climbing, extend extension ladders and lock in place, position the tip of the ladder against reliable structural components
  • Demonstrate safe use of forcible entry tools and techniques to remove barriers and produce an opening that is safe and provides appropriate access into a structure
  • employ search and rescue techniques in a structure while maintaining safety and team integrity, search all assigned areas, locate and remove all victims
  • operate a hose line in an interior structure fire, maintain crew integrity, deploy the attack line for advancement, gain access into the fire area, effectively apply water, correctly approach the fire using standard attack techniques, locate and control hidden fires, and bring the fire under control
  • perform vertical and horizontal ventilation on a structure, free ventilation openings of obstructions, use tools as designed, place ladders and ventilation devices correctly, and clear structure of smoke, as a part of a team
  • analyze tools and equipment needed to conserve property, demonstrate standardized salvage techniques
  • apply personal protective equipment and following standard operating procedures, activate an emergency call for assistance and exit a hazardous area without endangering others
  • demonstrate proper use of wildland personal protective clothing and shelter according to the manufacturers’ guidelines within 60 seconds
  • describe basic wildland fire behavior and recognize hazards and unsafe situations, promptly communicate hazard(s) to a supervisor, and take appropriate action
  • recognize the presence of hazardous materials and the indicators of a hazardous materials incident, correctly identify the materials involved, take personal protective actions, initiate the appropriate notification process, and secure the area
  • perform basic control, containment, and confinement techniques in a simulated hazardous materials incident; protect citizens, emergency responders and the environment from contamination

FIRE 1503 Firefighter Intern Recruit Academy

  • Units:12 - 12.5
  • Hours:130 hours LEC; 270 - 290 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Completion of a firefighter intern certificate.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a continuation of the firefighter intern program. It provides the techniques and skills to work effectively and safely within the fire environment as well as the fire department. Topics include indoctrination into the fire service, general maintenance, apparatus and equipment operations, fire control, wildland firefighting, emergency vehicle operations, salvage, fire prevention and public education, fire and arson investigation, rapid intervention crew tactics, vehicle extrication, physical fitness/wellness, emergency care, and forcible entry. This course was formerly listed as SMFD 1121 prior to November 2010. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the history, development, structure, organization, and responsibility of the fire service.
  • Apply the components and principles of the Incident Command System.
  • Explain the core values of the fire service and the duty to provide service to the public.
  • Perform preventative maintenance to fire station, apparatus, and equipment.
  • Use fire department apparatus and tools within the scope of assignment.
  • Explain and apply the basic concept of fire control, fire and arson investigation, and fire communication systems.
  • Demonstrate basic skills in public education procedures and instruction.
  • Apply work place rules and laws regarding harassment/discrimination policies and mandated reporting procedures.
  • Identify and demonstrate first responder responsibilities for handling medical emergencies.
  • Identify first responder responsibilities for mitigation of hazardous material incidents.
  • Demonstrate safe driving procedures for emergency response vehicles.
  • Apply principles of vehicle extraction.
  • Demonstrate fire suppression tactics and strategies.
  • Explain wild land fire behavior, suppression techniques, and safety measures.
  • Demonstrate firefighter rescue and survival skills.

FIRE 1504 CDF Firefighter 1 Basic

  • Units:3
  • Hours:48 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides basic knowledge, skills, and demonstrated abilities as required to perform as a California Department of Forestry (CDF) Firefighter 1 Basic. Topics include fire physics and vegetation terminology, personal protective gear, self-contained breathing apparatus, ground ladders, firefighting equipment, fire shelters, wildland hose-lays, structural firefighting, and safety procedures. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1096 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • exhibit the proper fit, care, and use of self-contained breathing apparatus.
  • describe the proper care and use of ground ladders.
  • illustrate the ability to properly inspect and maintain firefighting equipment per CDF's 67 hour firefighter manual.
  • demonstrate proper fire shelter deployment techniques.
  • setup wildland hose-lays in a field environment.
  • assess building construction for proper strategy and tactics related to structural operations.
  • demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities to safely perform the many firefighting tasks required of a CDF Firefighter 1.
  • create realistic wildland fire scenarios using a sand table.
  • compare strategies and tactics from past wildland fire incidents.
  • predict outcomes from decisions made on the fireline.

FIRE 1506 Transitional Fire Academy

  • Units:11.5 - 13.5
  • Hours:140 hours LEC; 205 - 300 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Acceptance into the transitional firefighter academy AND successful completion of a California State Fire Training accredited fire academy or lateral transfer from a full-time career fire department
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge necessary to assume the role of firefighter with the ability to work effectively and safely with the fire environment as well as within a company in the fire department in all functions of that urban fire agency. Topics include indoctrination into a particular fire department, general maintenance, apparatus and equipment operations, fire control, wildland firefighting, emergency vehicle operations, salvage, fire prevention and public education, fire and arson investigation, rapid intervention crew tactics, vehicle extrication, physical fitness/wellness, emergency care, and forcible entry. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and describe the history, development, structure, organization and responsibility of the fire service as it relates to his/her particular fire department
  • define, identify and apply the components and principles of the incident command system
  • explain the core values of the fire service and its duty to providing service delivery to the public
  • perform preventative maintenance on the fire station, apparatus, and equipment
  • demonstrate the use of fire service apparatus and tools within the scope of his/her assignment
  • explain and apply the basic concepts of fire control, fire and arson investigation and the fire communication system
  • identify and demonstrate the basic skills in public education procedures and instruction
  • demonstrate an understanding of work place rules and laws regarding harassment/discrimination policies and mandated reporting procedures
  • describe the importance of the wellness programs, stress management and approved academy physical fitness programs
  • identify and demonstrate first responders responsibilities for handling hazardous materials incidents
  • demonstrate safe driving procedures for emergency response vehicles

FIRE 1507 Firefighter II Academy

  • Units:3.5
  • Hours:42 hours LEC; 70 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1507) the student must be an employee of a state or local fire agency and a Certified Fire Fighter I.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the skills and knowledge needed for the entry-level professional fire fighter to perform one's duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topics include fire department communications, fireground operations, rescue operations, and prevention, preparedness, and maintenance. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify different levels in the Fire Fighter certification track, the courses and requirements for Fire Fighter II certification, and be able to describe the certification task book process.
  • identify and describe the role and responsibilities of a Fire Fighter II within the organization, determine the need for command, and organize and coordinate activities using the incident management system until command is transferred.
  • complete a basic incident report that completely and accurately records all pertinent information.
  • communicate the need for team assistance in a manner that consistently informs the supervisor, follows department standard operating procedures, and safely accomplishes the assignment.
  • operate as a member of a team, extinguish an ignitable liquid fire, select the correct type of foam concentrate for the given fuel and conditions, apply a properly proportioned foam stream to the surface of the fuel to create and maintain a foam blanket, extinguish the fire, prevent reignition, maintain team protection, and face hazards until the team successfully retreats to a safe haven.
  • operate as a member of a team, control a flammable gas cylinder fire, maintain crew integrity, identify contents, identify safe havens prior to advancing, close any open valves, and extinguish flames only when leaking gas is eliminated, the cylinder is cooled, cylinder integrity is evaluated, hazardous conditions are recognized and acted upon, and the cylinder is faced during approach and retreat.
  • coordinate an interior attack line for a team’s accomplishment of an assignment at a structure fire, establish crew integrity, select attack techniques for the given level of the fire (e.g., attic, grade level, upper levels, or basement), communicate attack techniques to the attack teams, maintain constant team coordination, continuously evaluate fire growth and development, communicate or manage search, rescue, and ventilation requirements, report hazards to the attack teams, and apprise incident command of changing conditions.
  • note and protect evidence of fire cause and origin from further disturbance until investigators arrive on the scene.
  • extricate a victim entrapped in a motor vehicle, stabilize the vehicle, disentangle the victim without further injury, and manage hazards, as a member of a team.
  • assist rescue operation teams, follow procedures, recognize and retrieve rescue items in the time prescribed by the Agency Having Jurisdiction (AHJ), and complete the assignment.
  • perform a fire safety survey in a private dwelling, identify fire and life safety hazards, recommend hazard corrections to the occupant, and refer unresolved issues to the proper authority.
  • present accurate fire safety information to station visitors or small groups and answer or refer questions.
  • prepare a pre-incident survey that records required occupancy information, note items of concern, and include accurate sketches or diagrams.
  • maintain power plants, power tools, and lighting equipment, keep equipment clean and maintained according to manufacturer and departmental guidelines, record maintenance, and place equipment in a ready state or report it otherwise.
  • perform an annual service test on fire hose, follow procedures, evaluate the condition of the hose, remove any damaged hose from service, and record the results.

FIRE 1520 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator 1A - Pumping Apparatus

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:19.5 hours LEC; 20.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Valid Class C California Drivers License.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on fire apparatus preventive maintenance and driving/operating. Topics include routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions, operate, reverse, maneuver, and turn a fire apparatus in a variety of conditions, and operate all fixed systems and equipment on a fire apparatus. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1260 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • perform routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions on the systems and components of a fire apparatus to verify its operational status.
  • document routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions by checking all items for proper operation and report any deficiencies.
  • operate a fire apparatus following a predetermined route on a public way in compliance with all applicable state and local laws and policies and procedures of the jurisdiction.
  • operate a fire apparatus during emergency and nonemergency responses using defensive driving techniques while maintaining control of the apparatus.
  • operate all fixed systems and equipment on a fire apparatus not specifically addressed elsewhere in this standard in accordance with the applicable instructions and policies.
  • demonstrate driving skills necessary to operate an emergency vehicle including off-road driving.

FIRE 1521 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator 1B - Pumping Apparatus Operations

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:18 hours LEC; 22 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1520
  • Enrollment Limitation:Hold a valid Class C Firefighter Endorsed driver’s license (minimum).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on pumping apparatus preventive maintenance and operations. Topics include routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions, producing hand, master, and foam fire streams, relay pump operations, and supplying water to fire sprinkler and standpipe systems. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1261 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • perform and document routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions on the systems and components unique to a pumping apparatus to verify their operational status.
  • produce an effective hand or master stream by engaging the pump, setting all pressure control and apparatus safety devices, achieving and maintaining the rate flow of the nozzle, while continuously monitoring the apparatus for potential problems.
  • demonstrate how to pump a 2½” or larger supply line to provide the correct pressure and flow to the next pumping apparatus in the relay.
  • demonstrate how to produce a foam fire stream to provide properly proportioned foam.
  • demonstrate how to supply water to fire sprinkler and standpipe systems at the correct volume and pressure.

FIRE 1522 Fire Apparatus Engineer Refresher

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:20 hours LEC; 21 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Must be in the position of Fire Engineer or above.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides updates, enhancements, and refreshes the skills required by the fire apparatus engineer. Topics include wildland firefighting, arson identification, structural firefighting, incident command, strategy and tactics on initial attack incidents, supervision, management and company officer skills. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1010 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to operate fire engine pumps and water moving systems.
  • demonstrate the ability to deploy wildland hoselays.
  • investigate arson fires set in the wildland environment.
  • assess leadership skills among various leadership styles.
  • operate within the incident command system.
  • compare incident management systems used to organize emergency incidents.

FIRE 1523 Emergency Vehicle Operator - Phase I

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:2 hours LEC; 7 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Completion of a State of California Fire Marshal approved Firefighter 1 academy.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is the first phase of operating the emergency vehicle for fire personnel. The course includes skid pan exercises and vehicle driving exercises. This course was formerly listed as SMFD & SFD 1041 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate ability to control a vehicle through a skid.
  • Evaluate traffic obstacles and apply roadway position.

FIRE 1524 Emergency Vehicle Operator - Phase II

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:2 hours LEC; 7 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:SFD 1041 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a continuation of Driver Emergency Vehicle Operator Phase I training techniques. It includes vehicle placement, steering basics, acceleration, and braking. This course was formerly listed as SMFD & SFD 1042 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Judge the traffic environment and select the appropriate driving procedure.
  • Compare courses of action while driving and select appropriate course.

FIRE 1525 Emergency Vehicle Operator: Fire

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:SFD 1042 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a continuation of Emergency Vehicle Operator - Phase II training techniques. It includes apparatus inspection, safety, code 3 driving, and special considerations. This course was formerly listed as SMFD & SFD 1043 prior to October 2010. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the primary points of apparatus inspection.
  • Describe the procedure involving driving with lights and sirens.
  • Select the responses in various traffic situations.

FIRE 1526 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator - Aerial Apparatus

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:23 hours LEC; 17 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500 and 1520
  • Enrollment Limitation:Hold a valid Class C Firefighter Endorsed driver’s license (minimum).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on aerial apparatus preventive maintenance and operations. Topics include routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions on the systems and components unique to an aerial apparatus, maneuvering, positioning, and stabilizing an aerial apparatus; maneuvering, positioning, and lowering the aerial device; and deploying and operating an elevated master stream. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the courses and requirements for the Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator – Aerial Apparatus certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • perform and document routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions on the systems and components unique to an aerial apparatus to verify their operational status.
  • demonstrate how to maneuver and position an aerial apparatus for correct aerial device deployment.
  • demonstrate how to stabilize an aerial apparatus and transfer power to the aerial device hydraulic system in order to deploy the aerial device.
  • demonstrate how to maneuver and position the aerial device from each control station to accomplish the assignment.
  • demonstrate how to lower an aerial device using the emergency operating system to its bedded position.
  • demonstrate how to deploy and operate an elevated master stream so the stream is effective and the aerial and master stream devices are operated correctly.

FIRE 1527 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator - Tillered Apparatus

  • Units:1
  • Hours:13 hours LEC; 27 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500 and 1521
  • Enrollment Limitation:Hold a valid Class C Firefighter Endorsed driver’s license (minimum).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on operating a fire
department aerial apparatus equipped with a tiller. Topics include practical driving exercises, and operating, positioning and stabilizing the apparatus from both the
tractor and tiller positions. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the courses and requirements for the Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator – Tillered Apparatus certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • perform the practical driving exercises specified in National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1002 paragraphs 4.3.2 through 4.3.5 (Practical driving exercises) without striking the apparatus or obstructions.
  • operate an aerial apparatus equipped with a tiller over a predetermined route on a public way using the maneuvers specified in NFPA 1002 paragraph 4.3.1 while in compliance with all applicable state and local laws, and policies and procedures of the jurisdiction.

FIRE 1528 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator - Water Tender

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:7.5 hours LEC; 24.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500, 1520, and 1521
  • Enrollment Limitation:Hold a valid Class C Firefighter Endorsed driver’s license (minimum).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on water tender preventive maintenance and operations. Topics include routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions unique to a water tender, maneuvering and positioning a water tender at a water shuttle fill site and establishing, maneuvering, and positioning at a water shuttle dumpsite. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • perform and document routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions unique to a water tender, to verify their operational status.
  • operate a water tender in compliance with all applicable jurisdictional rules and regulations and operational limitations of the apparatus.
  • maneuver and position a water tender at a water shuttle fill site, without striking any objects or stretching additional hose, and attach supply hose to the intake connections.
  • establish a water shuttle dumpsite by keeping the draft tank full at all times, emptying the dump tank, and transferring the water from one tank to the next.
  • maneuver and position a water tender at an established water shuttle dumpsite and discharge all of the water from the water tender into the portable tank without striking any object at the dumpsite.

FIRE 1529 Fire Apparatus Driver/Operator - Wildland Fire Apparatus

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:5 hours LEC; 19 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500, 1520, and 1521
  • Enrollment Limitation:Hold a valid Class C Firefighter Endorsed driver’s license (minimum).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on preventive maintenance and operation of a wildland fire apparatus. Topics include routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions on the systems and components unique to wildland fire apparatus, and operating a wildland fire apparatus and producing an effective fire stream. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • perform and document routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions on the systems and components unique to wildland fire apparatus.
  • operate a wildland fire apparatus in compliance with all applicable jurisdictional rules and regulations and operational limitations of the apparatus.
  • produce an effective fire stream by engaging the pump, setting all pressure-control and vehicle safety devices, and achieving the rated flow of the nozzle while monitoring the apparatus for potential problems.

FIRE 1554 Communicable Disease Awareness

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Currently certified as a California EMT-1
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides emergency responders with communicable disease awareness. Topics include identification, recognition, communicability, prevention, and the operation of communicable diseases. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1116 prior to November 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define most common communicable diseases.
  • identify signs and symptoms of communicable diseases.
  • describe communicability of diseases.
  • differentiate between communicable and non-communicable diseases.
  • identify standardized safety control methods, plans, and purposes.
  • apply safety methods to operate in the presence of blood or other bodily fluids.
  • identify medical/legal and ethical issues related to the intervention and response to communicable diseases.

FIRE 1600 Hazmat First Responder Operational

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:14 hours LEC; 2 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the basic strategies involving potential exposure to hazardous materials. This course also covers how to detect hazmat substances, consult references for information, and implement operational procedures. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1068, CDF 1068, SFD 1068, and SMFD 1068 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the typical agencies from all levels of government that are likely to respond to a hazmat event and identify their roles, responsibilities and capabilities
  • identify hazardous materials using the DOT Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG)
  • describe the value, methods and limitations of stabilizing the hazmat incident through safe containment; and, describe protective action options available to first responders
  • cite the health effects that hazardous materials present to the first responder’s life, health, and safety

FIRE 1601 Hazardous Materials First Responder Operational Refresher

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:6 hours LEC; 3 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1600
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a refresher covering the basic strategies involving potential exposure to hazardous materials. Topics include detecting hazardous material substances, consulting references for information, and implementing operational procedures. May be taken one time for credit. This course was formerly listed as CDF 1085 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the basic hazard and risk assessment techniques.
  • define and demonstrate selection and use of personal protective equipment provided to the First Response Operational (FRO) level.
  • explain basic hazardous materials terminology.
  • apply basic control, containment, and/or confinement operations within the capabilities of the resources and personal protective equipment available in assigned jurisdiction.
  • implement basic decontamination procedures.
  • explain relevant standard operating procedures and termination procedures.

FIRE 1602 Hazardous Materials Incident Commander

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:10 hours LEC; 6 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1600; Proof of completion of FEMA Incident Command System (ICS) 100
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the content related to the role of an Incident Commander (IC), during a hazardous material (hazmat) event, with the emphasis on personnel safety and management. Topics include hazmat laws and regulations, command and scene management, operational risk management, and protective actions. This course was formerly listed as CDF, FJPA, SFD, SMFD, and USDA 1091 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the most dangerous types of hazardous materials.
  • identify laws, regulations, and plans that govern an emergency response to a hazardous materials incident.
  • demonstrate how to estimate potential outcomes when given a simulated hazardous materials leak.
  • identify hazardous material disposal requirements.
  • identify potential action response options (defensive, offensive and non-intervention) available.
  • identify legal roles and rights of the media in a hazardous material event.
  • identify common "real-world" problems likely to occur in a hazardous material event.
  • demonstrate the ability to approve an appropriate level of personal protective equipment commonly used in a hazardous materials incident.

FIRE 1610 Hazardous Materials Technician: Module 1A: Basic Chemistry

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1600
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the student with the most essential and basic aspects of chemistry and physics as they relate to successful hazardous materials incident management. Topics include basic terminology and theory of chemistry, overview of the identification and hazards of salts, hydrocarbons, and other non-salts and, most importantly, provides the student with the skills required to recognize the hazard and behavior of a material given only its chemical identification or formula. It meets standards prescribed by the CA State Fire Marshal and Office of Emergency Services. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize chemical compounds in terms of general categories and classifications.
  • identify symbols, names of elements, and atomic numbers on a periodic table.
  • name the four families and their outer shell electron configuration, explain the octet/duet rule and predict the type of ion formed by each family.
  • identify the hazard of each family including reactivity and oxidation ability.
  • identify the six types of salt and predict the hazards, recognize the general physical, chemical, health and environmental properties of salts and non-salts.
  • identify alkane, alkene, alkyne and aromatic hydrocarbons.
  • define the physical parameters of vapor pressure, vapor content, vapor density, specific gravity, boiling point, flash point, polarity, and standard and normal temperature and pressure; and correctly identify the relative ranking of chemicals with respect to these physical parameters when compared to other chemicals.
  • define the concepts: fire, oxidation, the fire tetrahedron, heat transfer, ignition temperature, flammable limits, and standard temperature and pressure.
  • describe the importance of chemical compatibility to responders, recognize the 4 types of chemical reactions, list the rules of solubility and use an incompatibility chart to determine the potential reaction(s) between two materials.
  • determine the logical systematic order of elements,
  • list the features of reducing agents and oxidizing agents.
  • identify the structures of hydrocarbons including isomers or aromatics.
  • explain the difference between slow and fast oxidation, the effects of oxygen on the combustion process, and the factors to consider when assessing an incident for the potential of fire.

FIRE 1611 Hazardous Materials Technician: Module 1B: Applied Chemistry

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:20.25 hours LEC; 19.75 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1610
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the student with basic terminology and theory of chemistry as it relates to hazardous materials. Topics include chemical aspects of the hazard classes, toxicology, including hazard and risk assessment, function and use of detection instruments, monitoring hazardous atmospheres, and use of a field identification kit to identify unknown solids and liquids. It meets standards prescribed by the CA State Fire Marshal and Office of Emergency Services. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • list the different exposure levels and the terms needed to describe them, identify which are legal requirements and which are recommended and describe what actions (if any) must be taken in a variety of situations when given sample exposures.
  • describe the differences between and the unique benefits of using printed and electronic reference sources.
  • perform research on a named chemical using textbooks, computer based and internet based resources.
  • describe the process of looking for contaminants in air, list the major components of a normal atmosphere, and list the types of contaminants that make an atmosphere hazardous.
  • describe the process of looking for contaminants in air, list the major components of a normal atmosphere, and list the types of contaminants that make an atmosphere hazardous.
  • identify classifications of chemicals and incidents which require detection capabilities beyond the Oxygen/PID/CGI/Colorimetric Tube range and discuss and compare the capabilities of five different advanced types of instruments.
  • describe the principles of operation of Radiation Monitoring devices and demonstrate their use with sample sources of radioactive material.
  • describe the difference between strategic and tactical air monitoring and describe the elements that can affect the accuracy of tactical air monitoring.
  • define and demonstrate the process and technique(s) of the Field Identification of Unknown Solids and Liquids, as it applies to Hazmat Emergency Response.
  • describe how safety procedures serve as a reminder of the real hazards of chemicals and to demonstrate that these materials can be handled and used in a completely safe way.

FIRE 1612 Hazardous Materials Technician: Module 1C: Incident Considerations

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:18.5 hours LEC; 21.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the student with on-scene incident considerations. Topics include data research, meteorological considerations, protective actions, personal protective equipment, incident command aspects, site safety concepts, legislative and regulatory measures influencing emergency response, and contingency planning. It meets standards prescribed by the CA State Fire Marshal and Office of Emergency Services. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define toxicology, list 2 subdivisions of toxicology, and identify dose as a key concept in toxicology.
  • identify how various meteorological factors may influence a hazardous materials incident.
  • recognize general protective action concepts associated with hazardous materials response, with specific emphasis on evacuation and shelter-in-place options.
  • identify the three types of vapor-protective, splash-protective and support-function clothing and describe the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  • explain the significance of degradation, penetration, and permeation as they relate to suit selection.
  • identify the factors to be considered and the process involved in selecting the proper chemical protective clothing, at least three indications of material degradation of chemical protective clothing, and the relative advantages and disadvantages of various cooling methods/devices.
  • list the primary differences between a Drug Lab, an Explosives Lab and a Biological Lab, and list the response priorities.
  • describe the duties of a member of the Command Staff within the Incident Command System at a hazardous materials incident.
  • describe the concept of dose-response relationships, list the factors that affect dose response values and define the terms “lethal dose (LD)”, “lethal concentration (LC)”, “no observed effect level (NOEL)”, “threshold limit value (TLV)”, “permissible exposure limit (PEL)”, “short term exposure limit (STEL)”, “immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH)”, “maximum allowable concentration (MAC)”, “level of concern (LOC)” and emergency response planning guide (ERPG).
  • recognize the importance of establishing control zones and identify the three control zones to be established at a hazardous materials incident.
  • identify various environmental, mechanical, physiologic and psychological stresses that personnel working in chemical protective clothing are subjected to.
  • identify some of the problems and resources which must be evaluated in order to triage hazardous materials incidents.
  • describe the various decontamination methods, the types of decontamination, factors that can affect the decontamination process and resources needed to set up a Contamination Reduction Corridor.
  • demonstrate the use of plugging and patching equipment for drums.
  • demonstrate the use of transfer pumps for product transfer between drums.
  • demonstrate the safe use of chemical sampling equipment for solids and liquids.
  • demonstrate the safe use of absorbent materials for containing a liquid spill.
  • demonstrate the collection of evidence at a hazardous materials incident, including the use of chain of custody forms, evidence seals, scene mapping and photography.
  • identify and discuss the basic concept of levels of chemical protective clothing.
  • identify and use the accepted standard operating procedures for hazardous materials incidents.

FIRE 1613 Hazardous Materials Technician: Module 1D: Tactical Field Operations

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:20 hours LEC; 20 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1612
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the student with experience in hazardous materials tactical field operations. Topics include confinement, control, hazmat triage and sabotage, performing in chemical protective clothing, preservation of evidence, decontamination, and emergency medical system considerations. It meets standards prescribed by the CA State Fire Marshal and Office of Emergency Services. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the components of a site safety plan for a hazardous materials incident and identify key points that should be made in a safety briefing prior to working on the scene.
  • describe the duties of the Assistant Safety Officer - Hazmat within the Incident Command System at a hazardous materials incident.
  • identify various non-bulk and intermediate bulk packaging, the types of materials they contain, basic design and construction features, and some of the marking requirements for the various packages.
  • identify the following regarding intermodal tank containers: tank construction features, tank markings, general classes of tanks, tank fittings and how to handle hazardous materials in tank containers.
  • describe the type of carrier and material most commonly involved in highway hazardous materials incidents.
  • identify some of the ways in which chemicals could be used for terrorism.
  • identify the types of shipping papers that may be found on rail cars, as well as the types of information they contain.
  • identify various tank cars by type, capacity and contents they typically transport. The student shall also identify various tank markings and construction features.
  • identify various tank car fittings that may be found on the different types of tank cars.
  • identify how a liquid pipeline may carry different products, the types of information which may be found on a pipeline marker, basic guidelines to follow for mitigating pipeline incidents and some of the regulations pertaining to pipeline construction and safety.
  • identify various offensive control options that may be utilized at a hazardous materials incident including repositioning leaking drums, overpacking, using absorbents, plugging, patching and catching.
  • identify basic design and construction features of storage tanks found at fixed facilities, the types of materials they may contain, and the types of damage that they could incur.
  • identify some of the metals used in aircraft construction, and the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as the fuels and fluids generally found aboard aircraft and their associated hazards.
  • demonstrate the use of emergency hand signals.
  • demonstrate the use of grounding and bonding equipment for product transfer.
  • demonstrate the use of plugging and patching equipment for drums.
  • demonstrate the use of transfer pumps for product transfer between drums.
  • demonstrate overpacking of a 55 gallon drum by the "V- Roll" and "End Over" Techniques.
  • demonstrate the safe use of chemical sampling equipment for solids and liquids.
  • demonstrate the safe application of a "Chlorine Institute A Kit."
  • demonstrate the safe application of a "Chlorine Institute B Kit."
  • identify and use accepted Standard Operating Procedures for hazardous materials incidents.
  • identify and use the selected method for field identification of the released hazardous material.
  • identify components of the three phases of an effective incident termination: debriefing, post-incident analysis and critique.

FIRE 1614 Hazardous Materials Specialist Module 1F: Special Mitigation Techniques

  • Units:1.75
  • Hours:28 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1613
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an introduction to mitigation techniques. Topics include plugging, patching and repairing methods, advanced chemical field identification testing procedures, and fixed facility repair considerations. t is part one of a two part series (including FIRE 1615) leading to certification as a Hazardous Materials Specialist. It meets requirements of CA Code of Regulations Title 8, Section 519(q). Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • determine the range of skills necessary to function as a Hazardous Materials Specialist working on a Hazmat Team.
  • determine the safety hazards inherent in this advanced course and procedures to follow in case of accident or injury.
  • initiate and complete the identification of hazardous materials using the HazCat or 5-Step identification system.
  • identify rail tank cars by construction features and markings.
  • identify damage to tank cars that may result in tank car failure and understand how to repair damaged or malfunctioning fittings.
  • determine the magnitude of damage to rail tank cars involved in derailments and rail accidents.
  • determine features of MC 306/DOT 406 cargo tanks, materials transported, and methods of proper removal.

FIRE 1615 Hazardous Materials Specialist Module 1G: Advanced Field Operations

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:2 hours LEC; 38 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1614
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers material presented in Hazardous Materials Courses 1A-1F in an environment of scenario based full scale exercises. Students are evaluated on their ability to perform and be certified as a member of a Hazardous Materials Team. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • practice operational guidelines at simulated hazardous materials incidents.
  • utilize chemical protective clothing and perform simulated hazardous materials mitigation skills.
  • utilize methods and procedures to mitigate leaking containers.
  • utilize methods and procedures to transfer hazardous materials between containers.
  • classify known and unknown chemicals.
  • utilize methods and procedures to participate as a member of a Hazmat Team in simulated hazardous materials incidents.
  • practice safe methods and procedures while operating at hazardous materials incidents.

FIRE 1621 Incident Command System (I-200)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:12 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This class introduces the basic components of the Incident Command System (ICS) used to manage all types of emergency incidents. This management system includes common structure, responsibilities and terminology used on incidents at the local, state, and federal levels. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1052 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the principal features that constitute the ICS
  • identify the ICS organizational structure and how it is used
  • identify the ICS incident facilities and their use
  • describe the kinds of resources often used in incidents and events
  • define common responsibilities associated with ICS assignments

FIRE 1628 High Rise Incident Management - Basic Organization

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:3.5 hours LEC; 3 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the content related to management of major high rise fire incidents. The content is based on curricula established at the National Fire Academy and Firefighting Resources of Southern California Organized for Potential Emergencies (FIRESCOPE), program. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1078 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the critical elements of successful high rise incident management
  • identify roles and responsibilities for command and control procedures for major high-rise operations
  • explain functions of incident command/operations (IC/Ops), fire attack, base, lobby control, staging, rapid intervention crew (RIC), firefighter accountability tracking system (FATS), communications, and systems
  • identify first-alarm capabilities and incident command system (ICS) organization

FIRE 1631 Incident Management

  • Units:1
  • Hours:20 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Completion of a State of California Fire Marshal approved Firefighter 1 academy.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an in-depth look into the various areas of commanding an initial attack. Topics include command presence, transfer of command, tactics and strategy, and size-up. This course was formerly listed as CDF, FJPA, SFD, and SMFD 1092 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the history and behavior to predict and recognize the strategies employed in the initial attack.
  • Analyze the initial attack dispatch resources to be sure adequate resources are responding to implement the initial attack incident action plan.
  • Describe the communication and interaction with the fire organization, public, and media.
  • Prepare a company officer to utilize the ICS during an initial attack emergency operation.

FIRE 1653 Instructor I: Instructional Methodology

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:16.5 hours LEC; 23.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the skills and knowledge needed for the entry-level professional instructor to perform his or her duties safely, effectively, and competently. At the end of this course, candidates for certification will be able to teach and deliver instruction from a prepared lesson plan utilizing instructional aids and evaluation instruments. The Instructor will also be able to adapt a lesson plan and complete the reporting requirements to the local jurisdiction. Topics include instructional development, instructional delivery, evaluation and testing, and program management. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to review instructional materials and determine which elements of the lesson plan, learning environment, and resources need adaptation.
  • demonstrate how to adapt a prepared lesson plan to meet the needs of the student and the objectives of the lesson plan.
  • present prepared lessons using the cognitive and psychomotor methods indicated by the lesson plans to achieve stated objectives and enable students to achieve learning outcomes, following applicable safety standards and practices, and addressing risks.
  • demonstrate the ability to adjust to differences in learning styles, abilities, cultures, and behaviors, in order to accomplish lesson objectives, address disruptive behavior, and maintain a safe and positive learning environment.
  • demonstrate the ability to operate audiovisual equipment and demonstration devices so that the equipment functions properly.
  • demonstrate the ability to administer oral, written, and performance tests in a manner that eliminates bias and discrimination, conduct tests following correct procedures, and maintain the security of test materials.
  • demonstrate the ability to grade student oral, written, or performance tests accurately and secure student examinations, and grades properly.
  • demonstrate the ability to report test results by recording them accurately, forwarding test result forms according to procedure, and reporting any unusual circumstances in testing or test results.
  • demonstrate the ability to provide student evaluation feedback that is timely, objective, clear, relevant, and specific enough for the student to make efforts to modify behavior, and will include suggestions for additional study or behavior modification based on the data.
  • demonstrate the ability to evaluate other student instructor presentations to provide constructive feedback that identifies strengths and weaknesses of the teaching demonstration.
  • demonstrate the ability to assemble course materials by obtaining the lesson plan and all resources and equipment needed to deliver the lesson.
  • demonstrate the ability to schedule instructional sessions to deliver specified lessons.

FIRE 1654 Instructor II: Instructional Development

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:14.25 hours LEC; 25.75 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1653 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the skills and knowledge needed for the intermediate level professional instructor to perform his or her duties safely, effectively, and competently. Topics include developing lesson plans and evaluation instruments, teaching and delivering instruction, evaluating and coaching other instructors, analyzing resources, and formulating a program budget. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify different levels in the Instructor certification track, the courses and requirements for Instructor II certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • define the role of the Instructor II with regard to program management, instructional development, instructional delivery, and evaluation and testing.
  • demonstrate the ability to create a lesson plan that addresses Job Performance Requirements (JPRs) or learning objectives for the topic and includes learning objectives, a lesson outline, course materials, instructional aids, and an evaluation plan.
  • demonstrate the ability to modify an existing lesson plan to address the JPRs or learning objectives for the topic; and include learning objectives, the lesson outline, course materials, instructional aids, and an evaluation plan.
  • demonstrate the ability to conduct a class using a lesson plan that the instructor has prepared, using multiple teaching methods and techniques to achieve lesson objectives.
  • demonstrate the ability to supervise other instructors and students during training to ensure that all participants follow applicable safety standards and practices and meet instructional goals.
  • demonstrate the ability to develop student evaluation instruments that determine whether the student has achieved the learning objectives; evaluate relevant performance in an objective, reliable, and verifiable manner; and are bias-free to any audience or group.
  • demonstrate the ability to develop a class evaluation instrument that gives students the ability to provide feedback to the instructor about instructional methods, communication techniques, learning environment, course content, and student materials.
  • demonstrate the ability to schedule instructional sessions to ensure delivery of specified sessions according to departmental policy.
  • demonstrate the ability to formulate budget needs by identifying and documenting the resources required to meet training goals.
  • demonstrate the ability to acquire and obtain training resources within established timelines and budget constraints, and according to agency policy.
  • demonstrate the ability to coordinate training record-keeping in a way that meets all agency and legal requirements.
  • demonstrate the ability to evaluate instructors to identify areas of strengths and weaknesses and recommend changes in instructional style and communication methods, providing opportunity for instructor feedback to the evaluator.

FIRE 1655 Instructor III: Instructional Program Management

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:26.75 hours LEC; 9.25 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1653 and 1654 with grades of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces information on planning, developing, and implementing comprehensive programs and curricula. Topics include instructional development, program management, program and instructor evaluation, and test reliability and validity. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify course objectives, events, requirements, assignments, activities, resources, evaluation methods, and participation requirements in the course syllabus.
  • identify different levels in the Instructor III certification track, the courses and requirements for Instructor III certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • identify the duties of an Instructor III.
  • demonstrate the ability to conduct an agency needs assessment/analysis that identifies instructional needs and recommends solutions.
  • demonstrate the ability to utilize adult learning principles to design a performance-based training program or curriculum that includes job-related knowledge and skills, meets time and budget constraints, and supports agency goals.
  • demonstrate the ability to modify an existing curriculum to meet agency requirements and achieve the learning objectives.
  • demonstrate the ability to write clear, concise, and measurable program and course goals to correlate with agency goals.
  • demonstrate the ability to write clear, concise, and measurable course objectives that reflect specific tasks.
  • demonstrate the ability to construct a course content outline that supports the agency structure and reflects current acceptable practices.
  • demonstrate the ability to create a program evaluation plan that evaluates instructors, course components, facilities, and obtains student input for course improvement.
  • demonstrate the ability to develop a course evaluation plan that measures objectives and follows agency policies and procedures.
  • demonstrate the ability to construct a performance-based instructor evaluation plan that evaluates instructors at regular intervals.
  • demonstrate the ability to analyze student test instruments to determine validity and make necessary changes.
  • demonstrate the ability to develop a system for the acquisition, storage, and dissemination of test results consistent with agency policies and federal, state, and local laws and provides feedback to those affected by the information.
  • demonstrate the ability to administer a readily accessible training record system that captures concise information and meets all agency and legal requirements.
  • demonstrate the ability to develop recommendations for training program policies that achieve training and agency goals.
  • demonstrate the ability to select instructional staff who can achieve agency and instructional goals.
  • demonstrate the ability to write equipment-purchasing specifications that support curriculum needs.
  • demonstrate the ability to present evaluation findings, conclusions, and recommendations to agency administrator that are unbiased, supported, and reflect agency goals, policies, and procedures.

FIRE 1670 Fire Investigation 1A, Fire Cause and Origin Determination

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides participants with an introduction and basic overview of fire scene investigation. The focus of this course is to provide information in determining the area of fire origin in fires involving vehicles, structures, and wildland. Accidental and criminal fire causes are discussed in detail. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1240 prior to September 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish the four different methods of heat transfer and compare their effects during a fire's progression
  • choose the correct California Arson Law section when applying it to a factual situation
  • recognize the elements necessary for the ignition and the sustained combustion of fuel and heat
  • explain the elements required for an electrically caused fire to occur
  • identify common scene indicators of arson and apply it to a factual situation
  • describe the methodology required for a proper and thorough investigation of a structure, vehicle, and wildland fire
  • differentiate between the different types of explosions and their unique effects

FIRE 1671 Fire Investigation 1B, Techniques of Fire Investigation

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1670
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course expands on specific topics encountered by the fire investigator. These topics include detailed information on motives of fire setters; conducting a post blast scene; the investigation of a fire death; the recognition, collection, and preservation of evidence; interviewing and interrogation of witnesses and suspects; and the effect of a building's construction on the spread of fire. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1241 prior to September 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate between the six common motives associated with fire setters
  • examine a fire scene appraising the different safety hazardous associated with an investigation
  • compare a fire scene investigation versus a post blast scene investigation
  • examine a fire scene to determine the appropriate evidence to support a fire cause
  • compare factures associated with an interview and an interrogation
  • appraise a fire death scene to determine if a criminal act has occurred
  • organize their case investigations utilizing proper case reports, resources, and insurance information

FIRE 1672 Fire Investigation 2A

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1671
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on how to investigate, apprehend, and convict arsonists. It focuses heavily on legal case preparation. Topics include interviewing and interrogating suspects, search and seizure, warrants, courtroom demeanor, and working with the district attorney's office. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1242 prior to September 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • differentiate among the three effects of an explosion
  • validate an arson corpus after examining a practical fire scene
  • examine a fire scene to gather evidence in supporting a fire cause
  • appraise an explosion scene to determine if a criminal act has occured
  • organize a fire investigation utilizing case reports, court exhibits, and testimony
  • differentiate between the U.S. Supreme Court's finding and California's Supreme Court's requirements in preparing a search warrant
  • recognize the elements necessary for the ignition and the sustained combustion of fuel and heat in a practical situation
  • describe the methodology and procedure required for a proper surveillance operation

FIRE 1673 Fire Investigation 2B

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1672
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides advanced instruction in fire scene investigation, case preparation, and courtroom presentation. Topics include reviewing fire scene photography, sketching, evidence collection, interviewing and interrogation, and extensive use of simulations for developing and presenting an arson case in court. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1243 prior to September 2010. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the proper procedure of qualifying as an expert witness in fire origin and cause
  • structure interview questions with witnesses and suspects in accordance with federal and state law requirements
  • identify common scene indicators of arson and apply it to a practical situation
  • examine a fire scene to determine the appropriate evidence needed to support a criminal fire cause
  • verify an arson corpus after examining a criminal fire scene

FIRE 1674 Fire Investigator 1A: Basic Fire Investigation

  • Units:1.75
  • Hours:29 hours LEC; 11 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FT 304 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:On-line courses: Basic Electricity (CFITrainer.net), and Ethics and the Fire Investigator (CFITrainer.net)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on securing the fire scene and determining the origin and cause of the fire. Topics include responsibilities of a fire investigator, securing the fire ground, conducting an exterior and interior survey, analyzing fire patterns, interpreting individual fire patterns, discriminating the effects of explosions, examining and removing fire debris, reconstructing the area of origin, inspecting the performance of building systems. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the courses and requirements for Fire Investigator certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing processes.
  • employ the all aspects of the scientific method as the operating analytical process throughout the investigation.
  • secure the fire ground to protect all evidence or potential evidence from damage or destruction and ensure unauthorized persons recognize the perimeters of the investigative scene and are kept from the restricted areas.
  • conduct an exterior survey to identify and preserve evidence, interpret fire damage, identify hazards to avoid injuries, determine accessibility to the property, and discover all potential means of ingress and egress.
  • conduct an interior survey to identify and preserve areas of potential evidentiary value requiring further examination, determine the evidentiary value of contents, and identify hazards to avoid injuries.
  • analyze fire patterns to determine fire development, evaluate methods and effects of suppression, recognize false origin area patterns, and identify all areas of origin.
  • interpret individual fire patterns and the burning characteristics of the material involved in relationship with all patterns observed and the mechanisms of heat transfer that led to the formation of the pattern.
  • discriminate the effects of explosions from other types of damage to identify an explosion and preserve its evidence.
  • examine and remove fire debris to check for fire cause evidence, identify potential ignition source(s), and preserve evidence without investigator-inflicted damage or contamination.
  • reconstruct the area of origin to identify and correlate all protected areas and fire patterns related to contents or structural remains, return items potentially critical to cause determination and photo documentation to their prefire location, and discover the area(s) or point(s) of origin.
  • inspect the performance of building systems, including detection, suppression, HVAC, utilities, and building compartmentation to determine the need for expert resources, consider an operating system’s impact on fire growth and spread in identifying origin areas, identify defeated and/or failed systems, and recognize the system’s potential as a fire cause.

FIRE 1675 Fire Investigator 1B: Evidence and Documentation

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:24 hours LEC; 10 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1674
  • Enrollment Limitation:On-line course: Introduction to Evidence (CFITrainer.net)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on scene documentation and evidence collection/preservation. Topics include photographing the scene, diagramming the scene, constructing investigative notes, processing evidence and establishing chain of custody, processing victims and fatalities, selecting evidence for analysis, maintaining a chain of custody, preparing a fire investigation report, and disposing of evidence. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the courses and requirements for Fire Investigator certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • assemble photographs of the scene to accurately document and support scene findings.
  • diagram the scene and identify evidence, pertinent contents, significant patterns, and area(s) or point(s) of origin.
  • construct investigative notes that provide accurate documentation of the scene and represent complete scene findings.
  • locate, document, collect, label, package, and store evidence to properly identify and preserve for use in testing, legal, or other proceedings and examinations, establish the chain of custody, and avoid cross-contamination and investigator-inflicted damage to evidentiary items.
  • process victims and fatalities to discover and preserve all evidence while utilizing proper procedures and following protocol.
  • select evidence for analysis so the items support specific investigation needs.
  • maintain a chain of custody with written documentation for each piece of evidence.
  • prepare a written report that accurately reflects the investigative findings, is concise, expresses the investigator’s opinion, contains facts and data that the investigator relies on in rendering an opinion, contains the reasoning of the investigator to reach each opinion, and meets the needs or requirements of the intended audience(s).
  • dispose of evidence safely in compliance with jurisdictional or agency requirements.

FIRE 1676 Fire Investigator 1C: Preparation for Legal Proceedings

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:19 hours LEC; 21 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1674, FIRE 1675, and PSTC 1501
  • Enrollment Limitation:On-line course: Motive, Means, and Opportunity: Determining Responsibility in an Arson Case (CFITrainer.net)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information on legal considerations for a court proceeding. Topics include coordinating expert resources, formulating an opinion, presenting investigative findings, and testifying during legal proceedings. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the courses and requirements for Fire Investigator certification, and be able to describe the certification task book and testing process.
  • gather reports and records for a legal proceeding that are authentic, complete, and applicable to the investigation while maintaining the chain of custody to ensure the material is admissible.
  • evaluate the investigative file to identify areas for further investigation, interpret the relationship between gathered documents and information, and discover corroborative evidence and information discrepancies.
  • coordinate expert resources to match experts competencies to the specific investigation needs, justify financial expenditures, and further the investigative goals of determining cause and responsibility.
  • formulate an opinion concerning origin, cause, and responsibility for the fire supported by data, facts, records, reports, documents, and evidence.
  • present investigative findings that are accurate and include only need-to-know information for the intended audience
  • testify during legal proceedings to present all pertinent investigative information and evidence clearly and accurately while adhering to the appropriate demeanor and attire.

FIRE 1682 Interagency Incident Business Management (S-260)

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:16 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the foundation of incident business management practices. Topics include property management, recruitment, acquisition, and accident investigation. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1093 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • illustrate rules of conduct for incident assignments
  • describe the recruitment of casual employees
  • organize pay provisions, commissary, and travel times
  • assess compensation for injury
  • describe the acquisition of equipment, supplies, and services
  • examine property management
  • analyze cooperative agreements
  • describe investigating and documenting accidents and claims

FIRE 1703 Basic Wildland Fire Prevention

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the basic methods and practices used in wildland fire prevention. Topics include fire prevention history, campfire safety, powerline safety and fire investigation. This course was formerly listed as USDA 1107 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the history of wildland fire prevention.
  • List primary points of fire prevention.
  • Describe department policy on fire prevention.
  • Describe the five important areas in railroad fire prevention.

FIRE 1722 Division/Group Supervisor (S-339)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:CDF 1066 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge and skills to perform specific responsibilities as a Division/Group Supervisor within the Incident Command System. Topics include pre-incident responsibilities, incident arrival and check-in, assigned and available status, and out-of service status and demobilization. This course was formerly listed as CDF,EGFD,FJPA,SMFD,and USDA 1086 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify and define concepts of divisions and groups within the Incident Command System.
  • Describe pre-incident responsibilities
  • Describe responsibilities assigned at an incident.
  • Describe responsibilities while in available or out-of-service status.
  • Describe the demobilization process and explain responsibilities.
  • Describe Incident Command System documentation procedures specific to Divisions, Groups, and subordinate functions.

FIRE 1723 Professional Training for Fire Service Personnel

  • Units:7.5 - 9.75
  • Hours:84 - 114 hours LEC; 156 - 186 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Completion of a State of California Fire Marshal approved Firefighter 1 academy
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides current knowledge and techniques needed to maintain and improve fire service skills. It meets mandatory state and local training requirements. Topics may include fire service administration, suppression, emergency medical services, fire prevention, wellness and fitness, rescue, leadership/management, and command and control. This course was formerly listed as SFD and SMFD 1104 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe and discuss the various policies and procedure within the fire agency organization.
  • Operate fire department computer and related software.
  • Analyze various laws and legal issues affecting the fire service.
  • Identify the latest techniques to manage and supervise employees.
  • Operate various hose lays on the fire ground.
  • Calculate various mathematical hydraulic formulas to ensure proper engine pressures.
  • Apply different search and rescue techniques used to search structures.
  • Operate aerial apparatus for different fire ground and rescue situations.
  • Perform various truck company evolutions.
  • Describe the different approaches and techniques used in extrication.
  • Employ the various types of ventilation used in the fire service.
  • Describe how to secure utilities at different types of structures.
  • Explain the various type of techniques used to ensure firefighter safety and survival.
  • Describe the benefits of a post incident analysis as they might relate to firefighter safety.
  • Describe the basics of fire behavior.
  • Discuss the different techniques used to control wildland fires.
  • Discuss the different techniques used to control fire involving high rise buildings.
  • Recognize different medical problems through the use of a patient assessment.
  • Identify the various types of medical emergencies a firefighter may encounter.
  • Apply different treatment techniques used to treat patients.
  • Interpret the local protocols and procedures identified with in the EMS service area.
  • Identify the legal responsibilities of a emergency medical provider.
  • Demonstrate CPR.
  • Discuss the use of the incident command system as it applies to multi-casualty incidents.
  • Define bloodborne pathogens and identify ways to protect oneself from them.
  • Identify the correct personnel protective equipment use at various incidents.
  • Demonstrate self contained breathing apparatus procedures.
  • Demonstrate the use of other specialized equipment utilized in the fire service: saws, lighting, hand tools, etc.
  • Express knowledge of the periodic table.
  • Identify level of protective clothing for hazardous materials at entry.
  • Apply current laws and regulations pertaining to hazardous materials.
  • Identify category types relating to weapons of mass destruction.
  • Employ skill and knowledge in technical rescue procedures.
  • Conduct search and rescue techniques.
  • Apply a Rapid Intervention Crew, RIC requirements, and develop a RIC plan.
  • Describe the steps associated with pump operations and water flow.
  • Identify five (5) apparatus types used in the fire service.
  • Apply tiller operations and truck positioning techniques.
  • Apply defensive driving skills and Emergency Vehicle Operations Control capabilities.
  • Explain general staff sections in the Incident Command System.
  • Describe the responsibilities of the various positions during a major fire or emergency incident.
  • Identify the various ways that resources can be acquired and coordinated.
  • Describe command and control as it applies to an incident including the command and general staff positions.
  • Explain status reports using the Conditions/Actions/Needs model of field reporting.
  • Compare and contrast the differences between the various stages of fire.
  • Compare the relative effectiveness of different types of fire department connections and systems.
  • Identify specific risks and exposures in your first-in response area.
  • Conduct a risk assessment of occupancies and developments.
  • Identify the five (5) types of building construction.
  • Identify the high-hazard risks and develop a target hazard plan.

FIRE 1760 Low-Angle Rope Rescue Operational (LARRO)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:7 hours LEC; 17 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the techniques and methods for using rope, webbing, hardware friction devices, and litters in low-angle rescue situations. Topics include rope and related equipment, anchor systems, safety lines, stretcher lashing and rigging, mechanical advantage systems, and single-line and two-line rescue systems. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe rope rescue equipment, rescue knots and hitches, anchor systems, system attachments and fall restraint, belay/safety line systems, and load-releasing devices.
  • describe methods and techniques used to inspect and maintain rescue rope, webbing, and hardware.
  • demonstrate methods and techniques to tie knots and package victims and rescuers.
  • demonstrate methods and techniques for using rescue equipment to build lower/raise systems.
  • explain rescue scene organization and management.
  • demonstrate and apply basic low-angle rope rescue techniques.

FIRE 1761 Rescue Systems 1: Basic Rescue Skills

  • Units:1
  • Hours:9 hours LEC; 31 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500 and 1760
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides rescue professionals with the level of knowledge to perform urban search and rescues. Topics include team organization, rescue, and environmental considerations, use of ropes, knots rigging and pulley systems, descending, rappelling, and belaying tools and techniques, subsurface rescue techniques, use of cribbing, wedges, cutting/prying and hydraulic tools, use of fire service ladders in specialized rescue situations, and day and night simulated rescue exercises. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply techniques to operate safely when working around the structural collapse of light frame buildings.
  • identify the potential hazards associated with rescue operations.
  • build on skills acquired in low angle rope rescue operational (LARRO) training.
  • demonstrate techniques for lifting and moving heavy objects.
  • demonstrate techniques to break or breach building components to access a victim(s).
  • demonstrate techniques to shore and stabilize building components.

FIRE 1762 Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting (FC 5)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:19 hours LEC; 5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:FIRE 1500
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge to operate safely during an aircraft emergency. This course identifies types of aircraft, aviation fuels, proper extinguishing agents, and airport communication systems used in aircraft emergencies. This course was formerly listed as CDF, FJPA, SFD, SMFD, USDA, and FIRE 1062 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify typical airport operations
  • describe airport communications systems
  • identify types of aircraft, engines, and systems
  • identify the different types of aviation fuels
  • identify the different types of extinguishing agents and their appropriate uses
  • demonstrate proper utilization of protective clothing and breathing apparatus
  • describe how to work around aircraft emergency egress systems, aircraft armament and have an understanding of the types of hazardous cargo carried aboard aircraft
  • identify the importance of maintaining, knowing how to operate, and understanding the capabilities of aircraft fire fighting and rescue apparatus and equipment
  • demonstrate a sound workable knowledge of all facets of aircraft fire fighting and rescue procedures

FIRE 1763 Rescue Boat Operations

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:6 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Ability to Swim
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the skills needed to operate a rescue boat and perform rescue in river and flood situations. Safety, course philosophy, and terminology are covered. "In water" experiences for students include how to read dynamics flow for safety travel, perform self-rescue and victim- rescue operations, along with executing pre/post-inspections of the personal watercraft (PWC). This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1059 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the codes and regulations that impact rescue boat operations
  • identify the primary components of a rescue boat
  • describe the differences between rescue operations in dynamic water as opposed to rescue operations in static water
  • describe the inspection process on a rescue boat
  • describe the maintenance process on a rescue boat
  • identify the crew positions in a rescue boat
  • identify the different types of rescue boats
  • demonstrate how to launch a rescue boat
  • demonstrate how to hover and ferry a rescue boat
  • demonstrate how to shore a rescue boat
  • demonstrate how to trailer a rescue boat

FIRE 1764 Personal Watercraft Operations

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:4 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Ability to swim.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to operate personal watercraft on water related incidents. Subjects learned are the reading of water movement and the tactics/strategies for operating personal water craft. Not open to students who have completed CDF 1063, Rescue Water Craft. This course was formerly listed as CDF,SFD, and SMFD 1061 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the codes and regulations that impact personal watercraft operations.
  • Describe some of the tactics and strategies for operating personal watercraft.
  • Explain the philosophy of personal watercraft use.
  • Name the components of the pre-operation inspection.
  • Demonstrate the shoring procedure for personal watercraft.
  • Demonstrate how to right an overturned personal watercraft.
  • Discuss the differences between static and dynamic water as it realates to personal watercraft operations.
  • Demonstrate how to hover and ferry a personal watercraft.
  • Demonstrate how to perform a victim pick-up.

FIRE 1766 River and Flood Water Rescue

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:5 hours LEC; 11 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is intended for the training of fire service personnel in water rescue techniques. Topics include swift water rescue, submerged vehicles, drowning, use of engine/truck company equipment for water rescue, use of rafts and boats, and underwater search and recovery. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1079 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify river hydrology and where incidents occur
  • list the safety equipment required in water rescue
  • select the industry standard equipment for rescue
  • list river search techniques for day and night operations
  • identify medical concerns associated with rescue operations
  • describe the techniques employed in shore-based rescue
  • identify techniques for self-rescue

FIRE 1768 Vehicle Extrication

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:9 hours LEC; 15 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the knowledge and skills to prepare a fire fighter to extricate victim(s) from a common passenger vehicle in a safe and effective manner in accordance with established policies and procedures. Topics include sizing up a vehicle incident, scene safety zones, fire protection, stabilizing a common passenger vehicle, isolating and managing energy sources, access and egress points, disentangling victims, removing victims, and terminating a vehicle incident. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the fire agency’s role at a vehicle accident.
  • identify scene safety operation procedures.
  • describe fire protection policies and procedures.
  • identify initial vehicle immobilization techniques.
  • describe system awareness and isolation methods.
  • describe vehicle access and egress standard operating procedures.
  • describe extrication equipment uses, limitations, and safety considerations.
  • describe disentanglement points and techniques.
  • identify patient handling techniques.
  • employ protective measures for rescuers and bystanders during termination operations.

FIRE 1769 Trench Rescue Technician

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:10 hours LEC; 14 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1761
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course transitions students from classroom discussion to working safely and efficiently in a trench rescue environment. Topics include trench and excavation regulations, understanding soil, trench configurations, trench hazards, rescue team preparation, incident response, initial on-scene and pre-entry operations, shoring systems and components, installation of shoring systems, victim rescue and recovery, and incident termination. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate their knowledge by accurately citing specific regulations that impact trench rescue operations.
  • describe soil classifications and types, soil testing procedures and other factors affecting trench stability.
  • recognize types of trenches and excavations, along with the types of collapses, collapse patterns, and factors leading to trench failures.
  • describe the different types of hazards associated in and around the trench incident as well as how to mitigate those hazards.
  • recall and discuss rescue team preparation including rescue tool maintenance and use, scene accountability, personal protective equipment and scene safety.
  • outline trench rescue considerations when responding to a given trench rescue incident.
  • identify and integrate the operational priorities at a given trench rescue incident.
  • describe and demonstrate the pre‐entry operation essential to safely perform in‐and‐around a given trench rescue incident.
  • demonstrate various types of protective systems in trench rescue operations.
  • identify shoring system components and demonstrate how they are deployed and used in a given trench rescue operation.
  • demonstrate the installation of shoring systems in a given trench rescue operation.
  • identify factors that affect victim search, soil removal, and demonstrate victim rescue and recovery at a given trench rescue operation.
  • demonstrate all of the elements necessary to terminate a given trench rescue operation.

FIRE 1800 Firefighter Training (S-130)

  • Units:2
  • Hours:35.5 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides new firefighters with basic wildland firefighting skills. It also provides the knowledge needed to identify basic weather conditions, topography, fuels, and their effect on fire behavior. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate how to construct a fireline to required standards
  • demonstrate how to strengthen, reinforce, and use holding actions on a fireline
  • describe how to extinguish the fire with or without use of water
  • demonstrate how to locate self and fire on a map
  • describe how to assess and report fire situation data (written or oral) by radio and/or messenger
  • describe the assigned tasks and the safe actions used to complete those tasks
  • describe factors in a wildland environment which could impact safety

FIRE 1801 Fire Fighter Survival

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:4 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a greater understanding of how to avoid committing fatal errors on the fireground. Topics include fire fighter survival terminology, developing a survival attitude, increasing situational awareness, and problem-solving techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify fire fighter survival terminology.
  • demonstrate knowledge of the federal government involvement to reduce fire fighter injuries and fatalities and the guidelines and laws put in place from tragic fire loss events.
  • apply fire fighter fatality case study recommendations to enhance fire fighter training to handle their own emergencies on the fireground.
  • employ techniques for developing fire fighter survival attitude and identify personal equipment that fire fighters should carry in their possession for self-preparedness measures.
  • employ situational awareness to prevent the fire fighter emergency and recognize critical structural fireground factors.
  • employ "When to call a fire fighter emergency" and emergency communications when fire fighters become lost, trapped, or disoriented inside a burning structure.
  • employ Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) knowledge and techniques for air awareness and SCBA air emergencies, and applying them during hands-on evolutions.

FIRE 1803 Rapid Intervention Crew Operations

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:4 hours LEC; 20 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1500 and 1801
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for fire fighters to rescue a downed fire fighter in an Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) environment in the continuing effort to reduce the number of fire fighter injuries and deaths that occur regularly. Students train using evolutions and scenarios based off tragedies suffered by fellow fire fighters from departments across the country. Students receive information on how to locate and use these Line of Duty Death (LODD) studies as training and prevention tools throughout their careers. This course focuses on the three phases of a Rapid Intervention Crew (RIC) operation: 1) predeployment, 2) deployment, and 3) rescue. During the class, you will also gain a greater understanding of RIC operations terminology and the RIC mindset. Topics include identifying causes of firefighter injuries and fatalities at structure fires, describing and preventing common fire ground errors that have caused injuries or fatalities, demonstrating self-survival knowledge and techniques, and demonstrating and applying firefighter rescue and self-survival techniques. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1050 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify rapid intervention crew terminology.
  • employ fire fighter fatality case study recommendations to enhance rapid intervention crew training to handle fire fighter emergencies on the fireground.
  • employ techniques and training in developing the "RIC mindset" and steps taken before a RIC deployment occurs (pre-deployment) to increase the chances of a successful outcome.
  • employ techniques and training in conducting a RIC deployment, including search operations and thermal imaging.
  • employ techniques and training in conducting rescue operations once a downed fire fighter is located, including assessment and extrication from the structure.

FIRE 1804 Confined Space Awareness

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:6 hours LEC; 2 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides instruction in identifying a permit and non-permit required confined space, the hazards associated with confined spaces, state regulations and industry standards, incident management, communications, and equipment requirements. It does not qualify participants to make permit-required entries. Topics include regulations and standards, dangers of confined space incidents, permit-required confined spaces, hazards, resources needed, tactical worksheets, communications, nonentry rescue, and incident command. This course was formerly listed as CDF 1081 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the regulations and industry standards relating to confined-space incidents.
  • describe the history behind the dangers of confined spaces and describe the industry-recognized levels of training.
  • define and recognize a confined space.
  • define and recognize a permit-required confined space.
  • recognize and identify all incident hazards.
  • apply isolation procedures, considering hazard isolation and minimizing risks to rescuers and victims.
  • recognize the need for confined space support resources.
  • adapt resource application to the operational requirements and take into account rescue time constraints.
  • recognize the need for technical rescue resources at the incident.
  • apply search protocols, minimize risks to searchers, and account for all searchers.
  • employ communications with victim(s) and document victim(s) conditions.
  • perform nonentry rescue, operating the retrieval system to extract the victim, protecting the rescuer from fall hazards when working near unprotected edges, establishing and maintaining victim communication, managing the victim through the portal, and initiating patient care on extraction.
  • describe the mandatory positions and components of a permit-required confined-space entry, per Cal-OSHA.
  • describe how to properly terminate the incident, including performing rehab, debriefing personnel, inventorying and inspecting equipment, and completing documentation.

FIRE 1805 Wildland Firefighting Skills

  • Units:1.75
  • Hours:26 hours LEC; 20 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the necessary information required in wildland firefighting to safely operate in emergency conditions. Topics include map/compass and GPS use, radio use, hand tool use, fire shelters, belt weather kits, and human factors. This course was formerly listed as USDA 1109 prior to April 2011. Credit/No Credit only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in map reading, compass reading, and GPS reading.
  • Apply hand tools, radios, belt-weather kits, and fire shelters in firefighting.
  • Relate to the human factors in emergency situations.

FIRE 1806 Confined Space Rescue Technician

  • Units:1
  • Hours:11 hours LEC; 29 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1804
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is an intensive hands-on training program that will prepare students for confined-space emergencies. Topics include identifying confined spaces and permit-required confined spaces, the hazards associated with permit-required confined spaces, target industries and hazards, state and federal regulations, components of a rescue operation, and the roles and responsibilities of the rescue team. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify regulations and standards for entry into confined spaces.
  • identify confined spaces and permit-required confined spaces.
  • identify the hazards associated with confined spaces.
  • perform confined-space rescue on incidents involving terrorism or weapons of mass destruction.
  • select and use atmospheric monitoring equipment and the equipment necessary to control hazards in confined spaces.
  • identify, select, and use personal protective equipment.
  • use various types of victim removal and packaging systems.
  • construct rope rescue systems for confined-space rescue.
  • plan, organize, operate, and command at confined-space rescue incidents.
  • apply the principles of confined-space rescue through directed rescue scenarios.

FIRE 1807 Advanced Firefighter Training (S-131)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:8 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1800
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides advanced training in wildland firefighting skills with an emphasis on safety and tactics. This is suggested training for firefighters who wish to become qualified at first level supervisory positions. This course also meets the training requirements for Advanced Firefighter/Squad Boss and Incident Commander Type 5. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1067 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the appropriate information during fire suppression activities
  • incorporate and maintain open lines of communication with all appropriate fire suppression personnel
  • make informed fire fighting decisions
  • demonstrate the steps required to properly size up a fire situation and determine appropriate tactics
  • document fireline activities

FIRE 1808 Fire Ground Skills: Update

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:4 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:Completion of a State of California Fire Marshal approved Firefighter 1 academy
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course updates critical knowledge, skills, and abilities employed in emergency conditions. Topics include self-contained breathing apparatus, ground ladders, ropes and knots, apparatus operation, wildland hoselays, and fire shelter deployment and safety. This course was formerly listed as CDF 1048 prior to April 2011. Credit/No Credit only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate correct fit, care, and use of self contained breathing apparatus.
  • Describe correct care and use of ground ladders; demonstrate proper deployment and use of ladders.
  • Utilize and care for fire service ropes, including tying fire service knots.
  • Operate CDF fire engine pumps and water moving systems.
  • Describe use and care of fire shelters
  • Demonstrate deployment techniques.
  • Deploy wildland hoselays.

FIRE 1809 Wildland Fire Chain Saws (S-212)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:11 hours LEC; 25 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1809) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for prospective chainsaw operators. Topics include introduction to the function, maintenance and use of internal combustion engine powered chain saws, tactical wildland fire applications, and training for firefighters with little or no previous experience in operating a chain saw, providing hands-on cutting experience in surroundings similar to fireline situations. This course was formerly listed as CDF, FJPA, SMFD, USDA, EGFD, and SFD 1080 prior to September 2011. Credit/No Credit only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and apply chain saw safety standards as required by OSHA and agency handbooks, manuals, directives, and owner’s manuals.
  • identify and demonstrate basic chain saw operation, troubleshooting, maintenance, and safety features.
  • demonstrate the tactical application of chain saws in fireline construction and mop up operations.

FIRE 1860 Physical Fitness for Fire Service Personnel

  • Units:1.5 - 3
  • Hours:13 hours LEC; 42 - 130 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a physical fitness course for employed firefighters. It includes fire service wellness initiatives, cardiovascular and muscular fitness, safety and proper usage of exercise equipment, joint flexibility, hydration, nutrition and weight control, cardiac risk factors, and sleep disorders. This course was formerly listed as FITNS 341 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize major fire service wellness initiatives
  • investigate physical disablers and illnesses common to firefighters
  • describe the methods of self-evaluating personal fitness levels
  • examine the basic elements of nutrition
  • diagnose personal risk factors for coronary artery disease and formulate appropriate interventions
  • differentiate between safe and unsafe practices during resistance training
  • resolve the physiological responses of dehydration and supplementation through fluid replacement
  • access sleeping disorders associated with fire suppression and formulate appropriate interventions
  • recommend specific exercises associated with fire fighting

FIRE 1872 Basic Air Operations (S-270)

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:16 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers aircraft types and capabilities, aviation management and safety for flying in and working with agency aircraft, tactical and logistical uses of aircraft, and requirements for helicopter take-off and landing areas. Topics include the types of helicopters and air tankers and the criteria that make up each type. Also included are safe firefighting conduct operations when aircraft are being used. Note: The regulations, procedures and policies addressed in this course are primarily those governing federal agency and ICS operations. State, county, or other political subdivisions using this course will need to consult their agency having jurisdiction with respect to regulations, procedures and policies. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1058 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the Incident Command System (ICS) types helicopters and air tankers and the criteria that make up each type.
  • identify and discuss safety procedures to be followed while flying in or working around agency aircraft.
  • define tactical and logistical aircraft use.
  • describe safety procedures to be observed during water, foam, or retardant dropping.
  • identify helicopter operations.

FIRE 1873 Strike Team/Task Force Leader, All-Hazards (STEN/TFLD) (AH-330)

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:22 hours LEC; 10 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1873) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the skills and knowledge needed to perform in the position of Strike Team/Task Force Leader. Topics include position overview, pre-deployment responsibilities, concept of the position, resource typing standards, pre-dispatch preparation, incident responsibilities, administration, supervision, response, assignment, demobilization, tactics and safety, risk management, entrapment avoidance, Wildland Urban Interface (WUI), case studies, scenarios, and appropriate action vs. freelancing. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1066 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the differences between a Strike Team and a Task Force, so that Strike Team/Task Force (ST/TF) Leaders will maximize the use of resources, reducing the span-of-control and simplifies communications.
  • identify the qualification requirements for ST/TF personnel, so that ST/TF are formed and designated with the all hazard incident command structure.
  • assemble a ST/TF leader kit and personal “kit”, and describe the tools needed to assemble, brief and coordinate your resources while traveling to, during and returning from an incident, so that the safety, coordination and needs of all personnel and equipment on the ST/TF are provided.
  • identify personnel actions, significant events and equipment issues, so that understanding of agreements are maintained and the duties are managed with maximum coordination, notification and documentation.
  • utilize the resources of a ST/TF, so that the assignment will complete all operational goals with the elements of management and supervision while keeping personnel on track.
  • describe the proper steps to assemble and brief the ST/TF on the assignment, operational procedures, expectations, information on the equipment and personnel, so that guidelines for assignment, safe travel routes and checking in are performed on all hazard incident.
  • utilize assigned resources, so that Strike Team/Task Force resources are managed within incident guidelines matching assignments while assigned to an incident.
  • describe the demobilization process, so that maximum safety and orderly demobilization is completed with the resources of the ST/TF for efficient return to home assignment.
  • describe a snapshot in the “day in the life of a ST/TF leader,” so that elements and procedures are administered and managed on the all hazard incident.
  • describe risk and the risk control elements, so that risk is managed with calculated and pre-determined tools with proper risk refusal.
  • determine escape routes and safety zones when engaging a fire, so that human factors that contribute to fireline decision errors are managed with fireline conditions and utilization of required safety zones for maximum personnel safety considerations.
  • determine tactical maneuvers and tactical actions, so that an appropriate tactical engagement process is determine utilizing FIRESCOPE WUI placarding system.
  • determine and establish incident objectives, establish briefing elements, and provide feedback action item feedback for passover assignments on case studies, so that a relief transition assignment can carry the objectives of an incident action plan during the next operational period responding to an appropriate question and answer period.
  • identify and describe typical situations that may be encountered as a ST/TF leader, so that a predetermined systematic problem analysis is completed and can be documented or reported for standard outcomes.
  • determine unintended consequences, and identify potential freelancing decisions, so that the appropriate actions are determined to be directly in support of the all hazard incident action plan avoiding freelancing decisions.

FIRE 1874 Task Force/Strike Team Leader Refresher

  • Units:0.25 - 0.5
  • Hours:4 - 8 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course presents the rules and regulations required to operate as a strike team/task force leader on emergency incidents. Additionally, this course explains the many rules and regulations governing strike team leaders' actions. This course was formerly listed as CDF, FJPA, SMFD, and USDA 1075 prior to April 2011. Credit/No Credit only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify the hazards and risks on various incidents and describe how to mitigate them.
  • List and describe the rules and regulations as they pertain to a strike team leader's management of an incident.
  • Implement task force/strike team.
  • List and describe the five components of an Incident Action Plan.
  • Develop and implement an incident action plan.

FIRE 1875 Fire Operations in the Wildland/Urban Interface (S-215)

  • Units:0.25 - 0.75
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 4 - 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1875) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the firefighter operating as incident commander in areas where urban growth and expansion interfaces with the wildland. Topics include firefighter safety in the interface, managing human factors in the interface, pre-incident planning, size-up and initial strategy, structure triage, structure protection overview, tactics in the interface, tactical operations and resource use in the interface, action assessment, plans updates, and after action review. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1073 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe how to operate safely and effectively in a wildland/urban interface incident by using situational awareness.
  • describe how to perform structure triage.
  • describe how to operate safely and effectively in a wildland/urban interface incident by using pre-planning tools.
  • apply a basic understanding of fire behavior.
  • apply strategy and tactics unique to the wildland/urban environment.

FIRE 1880 Field Observer/Display Processor (S-244/S-245)

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:24 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:CDF 1052
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the techniques, theory, and practical experience to be a field observer/display processor in the Incident Command System Planning Section. Topics include identifying and interpreting maps, making map calculations, using observation aids, mapping from aircraft, making field observations, and processing and displaying data. This course was formerly listed as CDF, FJPA, SMFD, and USDA 1118 prior to April 2011. Credit/No Credit only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Define the various types of maps used in wildland fire situations.
  • Record weather and fire behavior measurements on a topographic map.
  • Demonstrate the use of equipment as a Field Observer/Display Processor.
  • Define the role of the Field Observer/Display Processor in the Incident Command System.

FIRE 1881 Helicopter Training (S217)

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:26 hours LEC; 14 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FT 55 (SMFD 1055) and FT 52 (SMFD 1052)
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an understanding of basic helicopter operations and their use on wildland firefighting incidents. This course includes aircraft terminology, helicopter support systems and helicopter tactics used in their operation. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1070 prior to April 2011. Credit/No Credit only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Perform safety briefing to passengers.
  • Listten safety precautions to be observed when working around helicopters.
  • Describe the procedures to be taken during a landing area emergency.
  • List and complete incident reporting documents.
  • List the six procedures to be accomplished during an in-flight emergency.
  • List the personal protective equipment requirements.
  • Discuss the general aspects of helicopter design, flight controls, terminology and principals of flight.
  • Describe "safe autorotation" theory.
  • Demonstrate how to correctly complete the helicopter load calculation form.
  • Identify various helicopter models and types.
  • Define helispots, helibase, and safety circles.

FIRE 1882 Ignition Operations (S-234)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course presents the functions of an Ignition Specialist or Firing-Boss on emergency incidents. It includes backfire and burnout safety training and the proper application of fire suppression firing methods and practices. This course was formerly listed as FIRE 1094 prior to April 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the roles and responsibilities of Firing-Boss and Ignition Specialist
  • name resources needed to successfully conduct an ignition operation
  • discuss an ignition plan utilizing fire behavior data

FIRE 1883 Chainsaw Bench

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers basic chainsaw field mechanics and troubleshooting. Topics include chainsaw components, attachments, adjustments, problems, and maintenance. This course was CDF, FJPA, and USDA 1083 prior to September 2011. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Identify 20 parts of the chainsaw and describe the function of each.
  • Describe cutting attachment inspections, adjustments, and maintenance.
  • List the three carburetor adjustments and the function of each.
  • Describe how carburetor adjustments are made.
  • Explain air and fuel filter maintenance.
  • List three problems that cause ignition failure.
  • List the daily, weekly, and monthly maintenance items.
  • Describe the procedure to adjust starter cord spring tension.

FIRE 1884 Crew Boss (Single Resource) (Blended) (S-230)

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:8 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:FFS 1541 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1884) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the performance of duties associated with the single resource boss position from initial dispatch through demobilization to the home unit. Topics include operational leadership, preparation and mobilization, assignment preparation, risk management, entrapment avoidance, safety and tactics, offline duties, demobilization, and post incident responsibilities. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe Crew Boss responsibilities prior to and during mobilization, on the incident, and during demobilization.
  • identify the hazards and risks on various incidents and describe how to mitigate them.
  • describe tactics which are appropriate to various wildland fire situations and procedures to implement them through the chain of command.

FIRE 1885 Firing Operations (S-219)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1885) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course utilities a blended approach to learning, incorporating a mix of online and instructor-led training (ILT). Students complete the online training portion of the course prior to taking the ILT. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of a Firing Boss (FIRB), outlines duties of other personnel who may engage firing operations, and illustrates common firing devices and techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the roles and responsibilities of the FIRB for planning, execution, safety, coordination, and evaluation of an ignition operation on a wildland or prescribed fire.
  • describe the characteristics, applications, safety, and availability of the various firing devices a FIRB has at their disposal.
  • given a wildland or prescribed scenario, prepare a firing plan and briefing that contains desired fire behavior, firing techniques, required resources, coordination, safety and risk management factors, and communication, to meet specific objectives.

FIRE 1886 Engine Boss (Single Resource) (Blended) (S-231)

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:3.5 hours LEC; 4.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:FIRE 1884
  • Enrollment Limitation:To enroll in this course (FIRE 1886) the student must be an employee of a federal fire fighting agency, or a member of a state or local fire agency.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to produce student proficiency in the performance of the duties associated with Engine Boss, single resource (ENGB). Topics include engine and crew capabilities and limitations, information sources, fire size-up considerations, tactics, and wildland/urban interface. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • perform the tasks of an engine boss in making the tactical decisions required to safely manage an engine on an incident.

Public Safety Training Center (PSTC)

PSTC 1200 Basic Law Enforcement Academy

  • Units:24 - 32
  • Hours:304 - 389 hours LEC; 410 - 584 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions 2) Possess a valid California Driver's License 3) Undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check 4) Be a minimum of 18 years of age 5) Be a United States high school graduate, pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university 6) Complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The Basic Law Enforcement Academy meets or exceeds the minimum training requirements of the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) for Level I Reserve Officer training and for Full-time Regular Peace Officer employment. Topics include: leadership, professionalism & ethics, policing in the community, introduction to criminal law, laws of arrest, search and seizure, presentation of evidence, juvenile law & procedure, investigative report writing, vehicle operations, use of force, vehicle operations, domestic violence, unusual occurrences, traffic collision investigations, crime scenes, evidence, defensive tactics, firearms/chemical agents, hazardous materials awareness, and cultural diversity/discrimination. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the components of leadership, the responsibility of law enforcement officers to lead, and the impact of law enforcement leadership on the profession.
  • distinguish between problem oriented policing and community policing.
  • discuss landmark events in the evolution of civil and human rights.
  • identify and discuss the freedoms and rights afforded to individuals under the US Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and later amendments.
  • describe a peace officer’s authority, responsibility, and potential for liability in the areas of search and seizure law, the protections provided by constitutional law, statutory law, and case law against unreasonable searches and seizures.
  • describe the rules of evidence as they pertain to relevancy, types of evidence, and evidence authentication.
  • discuss the consequences of using unreasonable force and the legal/ethical responsibilities to intervene if force used by another peace officer is inappropriate or unlawful.
  • describe the consequences for the use of unreasonable force on the officer, community perception, and public trust.
  • demonstrate safe and effective handcuffing procedures, mechanics of control holds and take down techniques, handgun retention techniques, and delivering strikes with an impact weapon.
  • distinguish and apply reasonable force options in a given circumstance.
  • demonstrate the safe and effective operation of specified firearms.
  • demonstrate the ability to safely drive and control a law enforcement vehicle while operating under emergency and pursuit conditions.
  • demonstrate appropriate actions officers should take to maintain their own safety and the safety of others while on patrol.
  • identify terminology, capabilities, exposure symptoms, and decontamination procedures in order to safely and effectively handle/deploy chemical agents and gas masks.
  • demonstrate proficiency in Victimology and Crisis Intervention.
  • demonstrate proficiency in performing the tasks of an officer conducting preliminary investigations.
  • demonstrate proficiency in contacting people with simulated disabilities.
  • demonstrate proficiency in responding to and investigating simulated in-progress crimes and critical incidents.
  • prepare an arrest report which minimally incorporates the elements of a crime, probable cause to stop, probable cause to search/seize evidence, recovery of evidence, probable cause to arrest, and admonishment of the suspect.
  • demonstrate proficiency in providing basic life support techniques.
  • demonstrate appropriate peace officer responses while testifying as a witness.

PSTC 1251 Skills and Knowledge Modules

  • Units:0.25 - 3
  • Hours:4.5 - 44 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to facilitate the acquisition of advanced skills and knowledge necessary for policing and peacekeeping in contemporary society. Course topics are based upon California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) updates to mandated minimum training for peace officers, legislative mandates, changes in local, state and federal laws, and evolving bodies of knowledge in the law enforcement field. Course hours are variable in order to meet specific local and regional needs which may exceed the POST minimum. Topics include: arrest methods update, chemical agents update, community relations, courtroom testimony, emotional survival, entry techniques update, ethics, field tactics, impact weapons update, interpersonal/tactical communication update, investigative report writing update, juvenile law update, legal update, less than lethal force update, search and seizure update, search warrant writing and service and tactical firearms update. Pass/No Pass.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the inter-relationship between statutory and case law, law enforcement practice and policies, and social and cultural change.
  • develop new and/or advanced skills and knowledge beyond basic academy competencies.
  • demonstrate skills and knowledge as POST mandated in the course curriculum.
  • pass POST required written and exercise exams for perishable skills.

PSTC 1270 Juvenile Corrections Officer Core

  • Units:7.5
  • Hours:126 hours LEC; 34 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the new juvenile corrections officer or the individual interested in a career in juvenile corrections. Topics include California criminal justice system, professionalism and ethics, defensive tactics, report writing, mental health issues, gangs and physical conditioning. This course is certified by California Standards and Training for Corrections (STC). This course is formerly known as PSTC 1519. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess gang signs to determine gang affiliation.
  • draft court reports making recommendations to court personnel.
  • analyze court documents to determine appropriate sentencing.
  • apply arrest and control techniques to restrain and/or take into custody law violators.
  • identify appropriate criminal codes applying to violations of the law.
  • define mental health issues that afflict individuals in a custodial environment.

PSTC 1271 Adult Correctional Officer Core Course

  • Units:8.5
  • Hours:151 hours LEC; 28.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for entry level positions in the adult corrections field. Topics include criminal procedure, interviewing and counseling techniques, defensive tactics, public relations, oral and written communications, classifications and housing of inmates, court testimony and indicators of psychological problems.This course meets or exceeds Standards and Training for Corrections' minimum training requirements for entry level adult corrections officers. This course is formerly known as SCSD 1139 and PSTC 1879. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the past and present criminal justice system.
  • assess a set of facts and apply the appropriate statute, code or regulation.
  • classify individuals as gang members based on specific identifying criteria.
  • categorize items as non-contraband or contraband in a correctional setting.
  • apply restraint holds.

PSTC 1272 CDC Advanced Investigations

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1294
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to enhance the basic criminal investigation skills of the California Department of Corrections Investigator. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply the accepted and standard methods of collecting evidence
  • recognize the effects of drugs and alcohol
  • prepare a valid search warrant
  • assemble and analyze intelligence information from various sources
  • differentiate gang affiliations

PSTC 1273 Probation Officer Core Course

  • Units:9
  • Hours:156 hours LEC; 40 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for entry-level positions in the probation officer field. Topics include criminal justice system, legal foundations, terminology, codes, statutes, case law, indicators of psychological problems, gangs, interviews, court reports, and report writing. This course meets or exceeds minimum standards set by Standards and Training for Corrections (STC). This course is formerly known as PSTC 1878. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate proper search techniques in a field setting.
  • differentiate the need to interview or interrogate a subject based upon a recognized fact pattern.
  • compare and contrast legal liabilities, roles, and responsibilities relating to the position of probation officer.
  • recommend a course of action to court officials relating to probation.
  • demonstrate the physical skills and abilities necessary to physically defend self and others.

PSTC 1275 Adult Corrections: Supplemental Core Course

  • Units:3.5
  • Hours:59.5 hours LEC; 10.5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1271
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course expands upon the student's existing knowledge of legal and procedural concepts introduced in PSTC 1271. Instruction is focused on correctional codes and statutes, inmate classification, contraband, and booking and inmate supervision. This course is formerly known as PSTC 1294. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply regulations related to Title 15 to a correctional facility.
  • assess inmate needs and provide appropriate supervision and care.
  • differentiate the different types and classes of fires.
  • compare and contrast inmate gangs and their cultures.
  • examine safety policies and strategies for supervising inmates.
  • evaluate situations and select appropriate security measures to safeguard inmates and officers.

PSTC 1300 Bureau of Investigative and Security Services (BSIS) Skills Training Course for Security Guards

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Applicants must 1) be at least 18 years old and 2) undergo a criminal history background check through the California Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the student with the skills training required for security guard licensing by the Department of Consumer Affairs, Bureau of Security and Investigative Services (BSIS). Topics include powers to arrest, weapons of mass destruction, public relations, observation and documentation, communication and its significance, liability/legal aspects, officer safety, handling of difficult people, trespass, and courtroom demeanor. Students will receive a certificate of completion at the end of the course and be eligible to apply for BSIS security guard registration.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role and responsibilities of the security guard/proprietary private security officer.
  • differentiate the legal authority between a security guard/proprietary private security officer and a peace officer.
  • recall the definition of arrest.
  • describe the circumstances under which a security guard/proprietary private security officer may perform a frisk for weapons.
  • recall the definition of terrorism and the techniques of physical security.
  • discuss the reasons security guards should develop and maintain positive relationships with community members and customers.
  • write a basic observation report.
  • identify internal and external resources that may be necessary to contact under normal and/or emergency conditions.
  • compare and contrast aspects of civil, legal, and administrative liability.
  • discuss aspects of personal safety.
  • recall the definition of trespass.
  • describe challenges associated with conflict management.
  • demonstrate professional demeanor before, during, and after courtroom testimony.

PSTC 1301 Skills Training for Security Guards - BSIS Elective A

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:8 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1300
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course improves the skills and knowledge of the BSIS Security Guard and is accepted as part of the 16 hours of elective training mandated by the Business and Professions Code section 7683.6 and 7683.6 (b). It may be taken within thirty (30) days from the day the security guard's registration card is issued or the day the security guard starts employment, or within the first six (6) months from the day the security guard's registration card is issued or the day the security guard starts employment. Topics include security officer safety and handling difficulty people. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify basic threats to officer safety.
  • discuss proper and safe measures to take when exposed to a blood borne pathogen.
  • identify hazardous materials, precautionary measures to avoid injury, and proper safety and notification procedures.

PSTC 1302 Skills Training for Security Guards - BSIS Elective B

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:8 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1300
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course improves the skills and knowledge of the BSIS Security Guard and is accepted as part of the 16 hours of elective training mandated by the Business and Professions Code section 7683.6 and 7683.6 (b). It may be taken within thirty (30) days from the day the security guard's registration card is issued or the day the security guard starts employment, or within the first six (6) months from the day the security guard's registration card is issued or the day the security guard starts employment. Topics include trespass and arrest; search and seizure update. Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss how trespass law applies to open land, private property, private buildings, public property, and other public places.
  • recall the Merchant Law, its use and limitations.

PSTC 1305 Introduction to Loss Prevention

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:PSTC 1300
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the student to the foundational concepts of loss prevention in the retail industry. It covers the roles and responsibilities of loss prevention officers, the crimes that commonly occur in the retail environment, the legal authority for the loss prevention officer to effect an arrest, loss prevention techniques, case building, and courtroom testimony. Students may be required to travel to multiple locations for course instruction and demonstrations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the impact of theft on retail businesses.
  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of the loss prevention officer/agent.
  • describe the types of crimes that commonly occur in the retail environment.
  • recall the legal authority for loss prevention officers/agents to effect an arrest.
  • identify theft evidence.
  • write a retail theft incident report.
  • compare and contrast floor walking techniques.
  • prepare for courtroom testimony in a retail theft case.

PSTC 1400 Limited Peace Officer Criminal Investigations I

  • Units:4
  • Hours:66 hours LEC; 18 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1501, 1555, and 1800
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide advanced investigative skills and knowledge to the limited peace officer, as defined in PC 830.11 PC. Topics include evidence, interviewing techniques, search and seizure, search warrants, working with victims and witnesses, managing informants, information sources, case preparation, courtroom testimony, media relations, and surveillance techniques. This course was formerly PSTC 1803. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the role of a criminal investigator at a crime scene.
  • recognize, identify, and properly handle evidence.
  • recall search and seizure laws and the legal requirements and parameters of a search warrant.
  • obtain investigative information using advanced interview and interrogation techniques.
  • develop and organize an investigative surveillance plan.
  • discuss the requirements, issues, and challenges of maintaining and managing informants over time.

PSTC 1401 Limited Peace Officer Criminal Investigations II

  • Units:3
  • Hours:48 hours LEC; 20 - 32 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to advance the skill set of the limited peace officer, as defined in PD 830.11 PC. Topics include personal safety, medical marijuana investigations, economic crimes, tobacco dating, crime scene management, evidence identification, collection, processing, and preservation, case management, investigative report writing, and courtroom testimony. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate and define situational awareness.
  • discuss investigative and evidentiary aspects of medical marijuana, economic crimes, and tobacco dating.
  • recall the common obstacles to effective crime scene management.
  • discuss the technological advances in evidence identification, collection, processing, and preservation.
  • assess case documents and files for investigative detail and compliance for regulatory review and audit.
  • prepare an in-depth and detailed investigative report.
  • anticipate courtroom challenges and objections to victim, witness, and suspect credibility and testimony and plan/implement investigative methods to minimize these issues.

PSTC 1402 Limited Police Officer Criminal Investigations III

  • Units:3
  • Hours:48 hours LEC; 20 - 32 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide advanced investigative skills and knowledge to the limited peace officer, as defined in PC 830.11 PC. Topics include community oriented policing and problem-solving, media relations, and surveillance techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define community oriented policing.
  • apply a problem-solving model to a crime pattern or quality of life issue.
  • evaluate social media content for investigative leads.
  • recall the laws and limitations associated with seizure of electronic devices.
  • discuss the legal issues associated with accessing social media accounts for investigative and evidentiary purposes.

PSTC 1403 Basic Skills for the District Attorney Non-Sworn Investigator

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:32 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide the student with foundational skills and knowledge for employment as a non-sworn investigator in a California District Attorney's office. Topics include the role of the district attorney and district attorney investigator, evidence, interview skills, report writing, technology resources, criminal justice information systems, subpoenas and due diligence, personal safety, and courtroom testimony. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the roles of the district attorney and the district attorney investigator.
  • describe the prosecutor's obligations in discovery.
  • list the components of evidence collection and preservation.
  • demonstrate basic interview skills.
  • demonstrate basic note-taking skills.
  • cite key provisions of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.
  • identify common law enforcement sharing applications and their capabilities.
  • define due diligence and associated legal requirements.
  • explain the necessity of situational awareness and the use of tactical communication in the field.
  • compare and contrast direct and cross examination.
  • demonstrate appropriate demeanor when objections are raised during courtroom testimony.

PSTC 1500 Basic Sheriff Academy

  • Units:25
  • Hours:198 hours LEC; 758 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is a consolidated program of regular basic law enforcement training. Topics include criminal law, juvenile law, laws of evidence, administration of justice, community relations, investigation, traffic control and procedures, patrol procedures, defensive tactics, arrest control, weaponless defense, baton techniques, first aid/cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and vehicle operations. This course is certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define necessary procedures including patrol, arrest, self defense, and vehicle operations.
  • explain and analyze basic investigations, traffic control, and community relations.
  • apply defensive techniques including handcuffing, baton, chemical agents, and weaponless defense.
  • analyze critical aspects of juvenile law, criminal law, laws of evidence, and other related codes.
  • demonstrate the principles of handgun shooting, including safe and effective techniques to manipulate the semiautomatic pistol in both the left and right hand.
  • write a clear, concise, and organized report which documents the facts and activities of a criminal investigation.
  • evaluate the consequences of using unreasonable force and the legal and ethical responsibilities to intervene if the force being used by another peace officer is unlawful or inappropriate.

PSTC 1501 PC 832 Arrest, Search & Seizure

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course satisfies the arrest, search, and seizure requirement for peace officers as defined in section 832 of the California Penal Code. Topics include professional orientation, justice system, knowing your community, laws of evidence and arrest, investigation, use of force and, arrest and control. This course is Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certified. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss ethical conduct required of today's peace officers.
  • compare and contrasts elements of a crime and select the appropriate crime code(s).
  • name the components of the criminal justice system.

PSTC 1502 Basic Law Enforcement Academy- Module III

  • Units:6 - 7
  • Hours:80 - 100 hours LEC; 86 - 126 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions 2) possess a valid California Driver's License 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age 5) be a United States high school graduate, pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university, and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

The course satisfies Level III training requirements of the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Level III module. Topics include: leadership and ethics, community policing and problem solving, introduction to criminal law, investigative report writing, use of force, traffic enforcement, crimes scenes and forensics, arrest methods and defensive tactics, and firearms. POST certification #2970-00133. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the components of leadership, the responsibility of law enforcement officers to lead, and the impact of law enforcement leadership on the profession and the community.
  • identify and discuss the freedoms and rights afforded to individuals under the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and later amendments.
  • describe the rules of evidence as they pertain to relevancy, types of evidence, evidence authentication and chain of custody.
  • perform the steps of a preliminary criminal investigation.
  • write a clear, concise, and organized report which documents the facts and activities of a criminal investigation.
  • discuss the consequences of using unreasonable force, and the officer's legal and ethical responsibilities to intervene if the force being used by another peace officer is inappropriate or unlawful.
  • demonstrate techniques to effectively direct and control traffic using hand signals, flashlights, and warning devices.
  • demonstrate safe and effective handcuffing procedures, mechanics of control holds and takedown techniques, handgun retention techniques, and use of an impact weapon.
  • demonstrate basic life support techniques.
  • demonstrate the principles of handgun shooting, to include techniques to safely and effectively manipulate the semiautomatic pistol in both the left and right hand.

PSTC 1503 Basic Law Enforcement Academy- Module II

  • Units:8 - 11
  • Hours:108 - 140 hours LEC; 132 - 200 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1502
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions 2) possess a valid California Driver's License 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age 5) be a United States high school graduate, pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university, and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course satisfies training requirements of the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Module II. Topics include property crimes, crimes against persons, crimes against the justice system, laws of arrest, search and seizure, presentation of evidence, patrol techniques, vehicle pullovers, crimes in progress, lifetime fitness, and career preparation. POST certification #2970-00140. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • distinguish between problem oriented policing (POP) and community policing (CP).
  • identify the actions which should be taken during a preliminary investigation.
  • describe a peace officer's authority, responsibility, and potential for liability in the areas of search and seizure law, as well as the protections provided by constitutional law, statutory law, and case law against unreasonable searches and seizures.
  • demonstrate appropriate peace officer responses while testifying as a witness.
  • prepare an arrest report which minimally incorporates: 1. Elements of a crime 2. Probable cause to stop 3. Probable cause to search/seize evidence 4. Recovery of evidence 5. Probable cause to arrest 6. Admonishment of the suspect, if appropriate.
  • describe the consequences for the use of unreasonable force on the officer, community perception, and public trust.
  • demonstrate appropriate actions officers should take to maintain their own safety and the safety of others while on patrol.
  • demonstrate handgun takeaway and retention techniques.
  • demonstrate the safe and effective operation of specified firearms.
  • identify the terminology, capabilities, exposure symptoms, and decontamination procedures in order to safely and effectively handle and deploy chemical agents and gas masks.
  • discuss landmark events in the evolution of civil and human rights.

PSTC 1504 Basic Law Enforcement Academy- Module I

  • Units:13.5 - 17
  • Hours:149 - 190 hours LEC; 286 - 360 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1503
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions 2) possess a valid California Driver's License 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age 5) be a United States high school graduate, pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university, and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course, the third in a three-part series of courses, satisfies training requirements of the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) for the Level I reserve or full-time regular peace officer. Topics include victimology, crimes against children, juvenile law and procedure, vehicle operations, crimes in progress, domestic violence, missing persons, traffic collision investigation, lifetime fitness, firearms and chemical agents, persons with disabilities, gang awareness, emergency management, interview and interrogations, courtroom testimony and emotional survival. Upon successful completion the students will possess a Certificate of Completion of the POST Basic Law Enforcement Academy. POST certification #2970-00150. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the officer's responsibility to provide ethical leadership in the law enforcement agency and in the community.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the safe and proper application of control holds, handgun retention, and handgun take-away techniques.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the safe and proper application of the carotid control hold and for aftercare.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the delivery of safe and proper impact weapon strikes.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the safe handling and use of specified firearms under a variety of conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency in victimology and crisis intervention.
  • understand the officer's legal responsibilities, duties, and obligations when interacting with juveniles.
  • demonstrate proficiency in first aid and CPR.
  • demonstrate the ability to safely drive and control a law enforcement vehicle under emergency and pursuit conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency in conducting pedestrian stops.
  • demonstrate proficiency in conducting vehicle pullovers under a variety of conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency is responding to and investigating suspicious persons and incidents.
  • perform the tasks of an officer conducting preliminary investigations of crimes against property and persons.
  • write an investigative crime report which is free of spelling and grammar errors.
  • write a traffic collision report and draw a related traffic collision diagram.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the administration of a DUI field sobriety test.
  • demonstrate proficiency in contacting persons with disabilities.
  • identify items commonly associated with illegal marijuana grows and clandestine labs.
  • pass the POST-developed physical fitness work sample test battery (WSTB).
  • pass the POST-approved arrest methods exercise tests.
  • pass the POST-approved firearms tests.
  • pass the POST-approved scenario tests.

PSTC 1505 California Highway Patrol Basic Law Enforcement Academy

  • Units:25
  • Hours:152 hours LEC; 894 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions 2) possess a valid California Driver's License 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age 5) be a United States high school graduate, pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university, and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This POST certified course is a consolidated program of training in criminal law, juvenile law, laws of evidence, administration of justice, community relations, investigation, traffic control and procedures, patrol procedures, defensive tactics, arrest control including handcuffing and weaponless defense, baton techniques, firearms, first aid and CPR, and vehicle operations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the objectives and responsibilities of each of the three components of the criminal justice system.
  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of the peace officer in modern society.
  • discuss the professional and ethical standards by which peace officer are held in order to maintain the public trust.
  • describe the psychological trauma experienced by crime victims.
  • identify techniques used to defuse crisis situations which result from people being victims of crime.
  • differentiate between the letter of the law and spirit of the law, and between criminal and civil law.
  • recall the statutory definitions, crime elements to arrest for, and classifications of general criminal statutes and specified property crimes, person crimes, and narcotic and alcohol-related crimes.
  • discuss the physical and behavioral indicators of child neglect and abuse.
  • describe the common emotional and physical reactions victims experience and the pressures associated with reporting a sex crime.
  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of peace officers regarding the protection of the rights of juveniles under California law.
  • describe how specified drugs can affect normal behavior.
  • recognize the existence of an illegal manufacturing/cultivating site for controlled substances based on observations and discovery, and how officers need to take appropriate safety precautions to protect themselves and the public from potential associated problems.
  • identify and discuss amendments to the U.S. Constitution and similar sections of the California Constitution that are related to peace officer authority, liability, and responsibility they have in making arrests.
  • differentiate the statutory rules regarding appropriate actions during a consensual encounter, detention, and arrest.
  • understand that in order to develop admissible evidence while ensuring the constitutional rights of all individuals, peace officers must correctly follow standardized practices for conducting crime scene interviews and interrogations.
  • understand the peace officer’s authority, responsibility, and potential for liability in the areas of search and seizure law, as well as the protections provided by constitutional law, statutory law, and case law against unreasonable searches and seizures.
  • identify the rules and requirements for peace officers to obtain and execute a search warrant and of the legal requirements for warrantless searches.
  • discuss the rules of evidence as they pertain to relevancy, types of evidence, authentication, and chain of custody.
  • discuss the laws governing the use of force including the Fourth Amendment standard for determining the objective use of reasonable force, the circumstances under which a peace officer has the authority to use force, and the level of authority agency policies have regarding the use of force by a peace officer.
  • write an investigative report that is well organized, includes facts needed to establish that a crime has been committed and all actions taken by officers were appropriate, and is relatively free or errors in sentence structure, grammar and other writing mechanics.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the safe and proper operation of a law enforcement patrol vehicle while utilizing defensive driving principles and techniques under a variety of low and high speed conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the use of force to include problem-solving, decision making, legal authority/individual rights, officer safety, effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills, ethical action based upon professional values and expectations, and stress tolerance and emotional regulation.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the use of effective communication, command presence, and appropriate physical control during the detention of a verbally uncooperative individual.
  • demonstrate proficiency in responding to reports of suspicious persons.
  • demonstrate proficiency in conducting safe and proper vehicle pullovers under a variety of conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency in employing effective tactics while responding to specified high-risk situations and critical incidents.
  • understand the peace officer’s responsibility to keep the peace in order to prevent a civil matter from escalating into criminal activity that could threaten the safety of officers and the persons involved.
  • demonstrate appropriate skills for defusing, mediating and resolving disputes in order to protect their safety and the safety of others, as well as prevent a dispute from escalating.
  • understand the peace officer’s legal and professional obligations as well as the need for sensitivity and effective communication when responding to a missing persons investigation.
  • perform the tasks associated with specified criminal investigations.
  • demonstrate competency in effectively directing and controlling traffic using hand signals, flashlights, and warning devices.effectively direct and control traffic using hand signals, flashlights and warning devices.
  • recall commonly used California Vehicle Code violations and the associated classifications.
  • perform the tasks associated with a traffic collision investigation.
  • understand definitions, laws, and procedures related to DUI arrests.
  • explain the legal responsibilities of a peace officer in the care and custody of an arrested person from the time of arrest to the transfer of responsibility to a local detention facility.
  • demonstrate physical proficiency in a law enforcement-related test battery.
  • demonstrate competency in conducting safe and proper searching, handcuffing, and take-down techniques.
  • demonstrate competency in applying the carotid restraint hold.
  • demonstrate competency in handgun take-away and retention techniques.
  • demonstrate competency in administering first aid/CPR.
  • demonstrate competency in basic handgun and shotgun safety, mechanical functions, manipulations, and shooting accuracy under a variety of conditions.
  • understand the laws regulating access and use of law enforcement information systems.
  • recognize the behavioral and psychological indicators of mental illness in order to determine if an individual is a danger to others, a danger to self, or gravely disabled and to determine an appropriate response.
  • discuss the indicators of gang involvement.
  • recognize the risks presented by hazardous materials and the peace officer’s role in responding to hazardous materials incidents and the indicators and warning systems that identify specific dangers of hazardous materials.
  • discuss the complexities and impact of cultural diversity within law enforcement agencies and California’s changing communities.
  • discuss how to implement the Incident Command System (ICS) and its relationship to the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

PSTC 1506 Sacramento Police Department Basic Academy

  • Units:22 - 26
  • Hours:251 hours LEC; 466 - 682 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions 2) possess a valid California Driver's License 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age 5) be a United States high school graduate, pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university, and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course presents a comprehensive program of training in law, ethics, community policing, vehicle operations, use of force, patrol techniques, firearms, traffic control and enforcement, criminal investigations, physical fitness, chemical agents, and first aid and CPR. Upon successful completion of the course, students receive a POST Basic Academy Certificate of Completion. This course is formerly known as SPD 1100. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the objectives and responsibilities of each of the three components of the criminal justice system.
  • discuss the professional and ethical standards by which peace officers are held in order to maintain the public trust.
  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of the peace officer in modern society.
  • describe the psychological trauma experienced by crime victims.
  • identify techniques used to defuse crisis situations which result from people being victims of crime.
  • differentiate between the letter of the law and spirit of the law, and between criminal and civil law.
  • recall the statutory definitions, crime elements to arrest for, and classifications of general criminal statutes and specified property crimes, person crimes, and narcotic and alcohol-related crimes.
  • discuss the physical and behavioral indicators of child neglect and abuse.
  • describe the common emotional and physical reactions victims experience and the pressures associated with reporting a sex crime.
  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of peace officers regarding the protection of the rights of juveniles under California law.
  • recognize how drugs can affect normal behavior.
  • recognize the existence of an illegal manufacturing/cultivating site for controlled substances based on observations and discovery, and how officers need to take appropriate safety precautions to protect themselves and the public from potential associated problems.
  • identify and discuss amendments to the U.S. Constitution and similar sections of the California Constitution that are related to the authority, liability, and responsibility they have in making arrests.
  • differentiate the statutory rules regarding appropriate actions during a consensual encounter, detention, and arrest.
  • understand that in order to develop admissible evidence while ensuring the constitutional rights of all individuals, peace officers must correctly follow standardized practices for conducting crime scene interviews and interrogations.
  • understand the peace officer’s authority, responsibility, and potential for liability in the areas of search and seizure law, as well as the protections provided by constitutional law, statutory law, and case law against unreasonable searches and seizures.
  • understand the rules and requirements for peace officers to obtain and execute a search warrant and of the legal requirements for warrantless searches.
  • discuss the rules of evidence as they pertain to relevancy, types of evidence, authentication, and chain of custody.
  • discuss the laws governing the use of force including the Fourth Amendment standard for determining objective reasonable force, the circumstances under which a peace officer has the authority to use force, and the level of authority agency policies have regarding the use of force by a peace officer.
  • write an investigative report that is well organized, includes facts needed to establish that a crime has been committed and all actions taken by officers were appropriate, and is relatively free or errors in sentence structure, grammar and other writing mechanics.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the safe and proper operation of a law enforcement patrol vehicle while utilizing defensive driving principles and techniques under a variety of low and high speed conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the use of force.
  • demonstrate proficiency in the use of effective communication, command presence, and appropriate physical control during the detention of a verbally uncooperative individual.
  • demonstrate proficiency in responding to reports of suspicious persons.
  • demonstrate proficiency in conducting safe and proper vehicle pullovers under a variety of conditions.
  • demonstrate proficiency in employing effective and safe tactics and/while responding to specified high-risk situations and critical incidents.
  • understand the peace officer’s responsibility to keep the peace in order to prevent a civil matter from escalating into criminal activity that could threaten the safety of officers and the persons involved.
  • demonstrate appropriate skills for defusing, mediating, and resolving disputes in order to protect their safety and the safety of others, as well as prevent a dispute from escalating.
  • understand the peace officer’s legal and professional obligations as well as the need for sensitivity and effective communication when responding to a missing persons investigation.
  • perform the tasks associated with specified criminal investigations.
  • demonstrate competency in effectively directing and controlling traffic using hand signals, flashlights, and warning devices.
  • recall commonly used California Vehicle Code violations and associated classifications.
  • understand definitions, laws, and procedures related to DUI arrests.
  • perform the tasks associated with a traffic collision investigation.
  • explain the legal responsibilities of a peace officer in the care and custody of an arrested person from the time of arrest to the transfer of responsibility to a local detention facility.
  • demonstrate physical proficiency in a law enforcement related test battery.
  • demonstrate competency in conducting safe and proper searching, handcuffing, and take-down techniques.
  • demonstrate competency in applying the carotid restraint hold.
  • demonstrate competency in handgun take-away and retention techniques.
  • demonstrate competency in administering first aid/CPR.
  • demonstrate competency in basic handgun and shotgun safety, mechanical functions, manipulations, and shooting accuracy under a variety of conditions.
  • understand the laws regulating access and use of law enforcement information systems.
  • recognize the behavioral and psychological indicators of mental illness in order to determine if an individual is a danger to others, a danger to self, or gravely disabled and to determine an appropriate response.
  • discuss the indicators of gang involvement.
  • recognize the risks presented by hazardous materials and the peace officer’s role in responding to hazardous materials incidents and the indicators and warning systems that identify specific dangers of hazardous materials.
  • discuss the complexities and impact of cultural diversity within law enforcement agencies and California’s changing communities.
  • discuss how to implement the Incident Command System (ICS) and its relationship to the Standardized Emergency Management System (SEMS) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

PSTC 1507 Preparing for a Law Enforcement Career

  • Units:0.5 - 0.75
  • Hours:4 - 8 hours LEC; 16 - 24 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the student to requirements that must be met for application and acceptance into a California Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) certified regular basic law enforcement academy. Topics include an overview of the academy training program and program standards, POST and legislatively mandated pre-academy testing, educational requirements, required clearances, reading and writing tests, physical skills tests, and availability of financial assistance through the community college. It also covers guidance in researching law enforcement agencies throughout the state and preparing for a law enforcement agency background and interview process. Field trips may be required. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • articulate the legal requirements for application and acceptance into a POST certified regular basic law enforcement academy.
  • describe the recommended skill set for academy applicants.
  • discuss the purpose and role of the law enforcement communication metric.
  • identify behaviors consistent with law enforcement academy success.
  • demonstrate written communication skills in a writing exercise.
  • demonstrate oral communication skills in a mock interview.

PSTC 1512 POST Instructor Development - Intermediate Level 2

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the skills necessary for obtaining level 2 instructor certification through California California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Topics include learning theories, instructional design, student assessment, outcome-based learning, problem-based learning, facilitation skills, active learning, presentation skills, and critical thinking. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • design a lesson and/or learning activity that addresses learning styles, learning modalities, and the different audiences within the training environment.
  • integrate assessment strategies that determine what students know, don't know, and need to know based on presented evidence.
  • analyze the quality of critical thinking and problem solving in a lesson plan.
  • explain the concept of problem based learning.

PSTC 1514 Academy Graduate Training - SPD

  • Units:1.5 - 2
  • Hours:28 - 34 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course, designed for the new academy graduate, provides specific additional training in areas not covered in the POST Basic Academy. Topics include use of the intoxilyzer, in-car camera, field training overview and the robbery alarm monitor system. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the proper and effective use of the intoxilyzer.
  • explain the M26 Taser device and demonstrate the necessary after force care following use on an individual.
  • describe the purpose and function of the Internal Affairs Unit.
  • describe the purpose and function of the Peace Officers' Association.

PSTC 1515 Academy Instructor Certification Course

  • Units:1
  • Hours:8 hours LEC; 32 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for instructors assigned to teach at a POST-certified basic law enforcement academy. Upon completion of the course, students receive a POST AICC certificate of completion. Topics include adult learning methodologies, facilitation skills, and the POST regular basic academy instructional design. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define and apply adult learning concepts and principles in an educational setting.
  • identify the roles and responsibilities of a basic academy instructor.
  • design and integrate course curriculum and lesson plans with POST training and testing specifications.
  • demonstrate knowledge of a variety of instructional techniques and a commitment to delivering entry-level training.
  • compare and contrast a variety of instructor and student learning resources and training aids.

PSTC 1517 Academy Graduate Training

  • Units:2
  • Hours:51 hours LEC; 22 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:California POST-certified basic law enforcement academy within 2 years or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the recent POST-certified law enforcement academy graduate with additional training in topics specific to daily field operations. It is intended to bridge the academy and field training programs with a focus on enhancing the safety and well-being of law enforcement officers and the communities they serve. Topics include introduction to the field training program, internal affairs and the role of the police officers union, legal update, fair and impartial policing, less lethal force options and deployment, crowd movement and control, court appearances, and work-life balance and wellness. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the purpose and objectives of the field training program.
  • discuss the relationship between cultural competency and fair and impartial policing
  • identify effective techniques for cross-cultural communication.
  • describe the applications of various technology resources utilized in field operations, criminal investigations, and community outreach efforts.
  • explain the appropriate circumstances for employing the Conductive Energy Device (CED), bean bag, and other less than lethal equipment.
  • report potential infectious disease exposures.
  • describe the internal affairs investigations process and the role of the police officers union.

PSTC 1520 POST Supervisor

  • Units:2
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 64 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST-certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee that state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the legal, moral, and ethical responsibilities and challenges associated with first line field operations supervision specific to the law enforcement environment. Lectures, facilitated discussions, and student presentations emphasize the examination of case studies, reviews and updates of case and statutory law, situational leadership, followership, critical incidents and critical incident management, stress management, managing conflict, counseling, and problem solving. It includes examining personality profiles for effective team development and supervision, developing and conducting subordinate counseling sessions, and preparing performance evaluations and improvement programs. This course is certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training, POST #2970-00400. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the law enforcement supervisor's vicarious responsibility and liability for subordinate personnel.
  • identify subordinate behavior that requires intervention, counseling, or disciplinary measures.
  • develop a performance improvement plan for subordinate personnel.
  • identify common types of stress experienced by on-duty law enforcement officers, signs and behaviors associated with stress, and resources for stress prevention and management.
  • identify leader actions to manage difficult personalities.
  • resolve workplace conflicts in accordance with state and federal law and within organizational parameters.

PSTC 1521 Supervisory (STC Format)

  • Units:2
  • Hours:24 hours LEC; 56 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1270, 1271, or 1273
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course focuses on aspects of supervision specific to the field of corrections. This examination of supervision in the context of parole and probation environments will include ethics, problem solving, discipline, legal update, grievance procedures, and leadership. This course is accredited by the State of California's Standards and Training for Corrections (STC) with STC Certification #0218-011703. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • diagnose and document the performance of subordinate officers.
  • define and apply the legal requirements involved in supervision.
  • resolve employee work environment conflicts within the standards of organizational parameters.
  • evaluate, research and recommend resolutions to employees' legal grievance procedures.

PSTC 1522 Supervisor Training -Non-Sworn

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of the non-sworn public safety first-line supervisor, focusing on ethical leadership, vicarious liability and sources of influence. Students will explore the use of effective communication in counseling, mentoring, recognizing training opportunities and performance evaluations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the the relationship between effective communication and ethical leadership.
  • compare and contrast leadership techniques and select the appropriate technique for influencing the outcome of a given situation.
  • evaluate subordinate employees for retention, additional responsibilities, commendation and promotion.
  • recognize the need to counsel an employee and apply appropriate disciplinary measures.

PSTC 1525 Supervisory Update

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:1 hours LEC; 23 - 39 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1520
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide the existing law enforcement supervisor with updated training on contemporary supervisory issues and techniques. Topics include leadership and ethics, tactical resources, legal issues, general orders, use of force and progressive discipline. This course is presented in educational partnership with the Sacramento Police Department and is accredited by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) with POST Certification number #9270-1200 and #1039-1200. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize issues in the transition from first line officer to supervisor.
  • explain the need to provide reasonable accommodations for personnel, in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
  • examine existing departmental policies and procedures for appropriate application and revision.
  • describe progressive discipline and the processes for its application.
  • prioritize the multiple tasks assigned to peace officers during their duty assignments.

PSTC 1531 Frontline Leadership SPD

  • Units:3
  • Hours:71 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to enhance the leadership skills of line level personnel, both sworn and civilian. It is not intended for supervisors. The course also introduces strategies for dealing with a variety of work place challenges and ethics issues. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate different leadership techniques.
  • define how paradigms and filters affect us and the people we have contact with.
  • discuss how values affect decision making.
  • compare and contrast discipline and punishment.
  • discuss how attitude affects interpersonal communication.
  • formulate appropriate personal goals.
  • apply sound leadership techniques.

PSTC 1533 Internal Affairs Investigation

  • Units:1
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the issues and techniques associated with conducting Internal Affairs investigations in a law enforcement environment. Topics include the role and purpose of internal affairs, risk and liability assessment, role of internal affairs investigator, policy considerations and public employee rights. This course also explores the impact of internal investigations on employees, the organization and the public. This course is certified by the California Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of the internal affairs investigator.
  • recall case law relative to internal affairs investigations.
  • conduct a risk and liability assessment.
  • identify public safety/law enforcement employee misconduct.
  • conduct public safety/law enforcement internal affairs investigations.
  • recognize challenges in conducting an internal affairs investigation.

PSTC 1534 Sergeant Training and Orientation Program (TOPS)

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the new police supervisor to the responsibilities and job requirements of the sergeant position. Emphasis is placed on leadership, handling of critical incidents, major crimes, internal affairs, and pursuit liability. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define police department expectations of a new sergeant.
  • explain the civil liability implications while supervising vehicle pursuits and other major incidents.
  • apply sound leadership techniques.

PSTC 1542 Property and Evidence Room Management

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the legal requirements, procedures, and basic responsibilities and techniques involved in the proper operation of a property room. Topics include property room problems and solutions, packaging, security, storage management, documentation, purging, dispositions, audits, and inventories.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • diagnose an agency property and evidence room systems and make recommendations for increased efficacy.
  • critique internal controls related to intake, storage and disposal.
  • analyze agency controls and author policy and procedures manuals.

PSTC 1550 Code Enforcement Officer

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for newly appointed code enforcement/peace officer who is assigned to enforce the codes of a city, county, or state. Topics include ethics, zoning laws, sub-standard housing, inspection protocol, report writing, case preparation, and administrative hearings. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the laws and procedures related to code enforcement abatement and zoning.
  • critique the protocol of inspections and determine the difference between sub-standard and safe housing.
  • formulate the elements for case preparation and documentation for prosecution in court.

PSTC 1551 Code Enforcement Officer - Intermediate

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1550
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for code enforcement/peace officers with experience enforcing city, county, and state administrative codes. Topics include legal update, courtroom testimony, administrative hearings, tactical communication, use of pepper spray, problem oriented policing (POP), customer service, officer safety, and animal awareness. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define recent changes to laws and procedures relative to code enforcement.
  • evaluate possible communication techniques when contacting upset, angry or irrational subjects.
  • investigate neighborhood code violations while using good customer service.
  • recognize the potential hazards in dealing with domestic and/or wild animals.
  • formulate an action plan to safely handle a dangerous animal.
  • apply problem oriented policing strategies to neighborhood complaints.

PSTC 1552 Code Enforcement Officer - Advanced

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1551
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers advanced topics for code enforcement/peace officers. Topics include legal updates and personal safety, with a focus on vectors, molds, fire, electrical, and plumbing codes. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the existence and type of mold present in various environments.
  • research the differences between fire, electrical, plumbing and mechanical codes.
  • formulate a rudimentary safety plan for an inspection and activate necessary techniques.

PSTC 1555 Regulatory Investigative Techniques

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the law enforcement officer assigned to an investigative role within a state agency. The course focuses on techniques that enhance the investigator's ability to prepare a criminal or administrative cases for prosecution in a criminal or administrative hearing. Topics include roles and responsibilities, interview techniques, search warrants and report writing. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of an investigator.
  • compare and contrast an inspection warrant, subpoena duces tecum, and search warrant.
  • analyze legal issues and apply the appropriate investigative technique.

PSTC 1571 Field Training Officer

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee that state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for newly assigned personnel responsible for training entry-level law enforcement officers. Topics include field training program goals and objectives; the expectations, functions, and roles of the field training officer; legal and liability issues for field training officers; driver awareness and safety; interaction with persons with mental illness or intellectual disability; teaching and training skills development; competency evaluation and documentation; intervention techniques; remediation; and test and scenario development strategies. Field Training Officer is certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST), certification #2970-31725. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the four goals of the law enforcement field training program.
  • compare and contrast the basic law enforcement academy environment and the law enforcement training environment.
  • analyze and evaluate leadership and ethical dilemmas common in the law enforcement and field training environment, and develop risk management strategies to reduce liability exposure for the trainee, trainer, and organization.
  • design and deliver a course of competency-based remedial instruction.
  • recognize behavioral cues and other indicators of people with mental illness or intellectual disability.
  • employ strategies to effectively intervene and safely manage encounters involving people in crisis.
  • identify common stressors that affect a law enforcement trainee's performance and the available resources to minimize the trainee's psychological, physical, and emotional stress.
  • identify and discuss methods to evaluate and remediate a trainee's mental and physiological preparedness and ethical awareness for operating a vehicle under normal and emergency conditions.
  • demonstrate appropriate and effective field training intervention strategies.
  • analyze, evaluate, and impartially document a law enforcement trainee's performance against agency-established standards of core competencies.
  • utilize the Situational Leadership concept and an ethical decision making model to prepare a recruit evaluation and remedial performance plan.

PSTC 1572 Field Training Officer - Update

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1571
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course updates field training officers on new training methods, new policing methods, and legal liabilities. Topics include academy update, remediation methodologies, tactical communications, adult learning theories, ethics, liability, and supervision. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply the basic components of communication skills and techniques.
  • evaluate and document employee performance.
  • employ adult learning techniques to facilitate individual learning styles.

PSTC 1573 Field Training Program Supervisor, Administrator, Coordinator Course

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This POST certified course is designed for personnel responsible for administering their law enforcement agency's Field Training Program. Topics include POST approved Field Training Program and manual, managing a training program, documentation and legal liability. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • diagnose an agency POST approved Field Training program.
  • design an adult learning Field Training Program activity.
  • prioritize the legal and liability issues within a training program.

PSTC 1581 Volunteeers in Partnership with the Sheriff - Module A

  • Units:1
  • Hours:26 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed as an entry level course for individuals who desire to work for law enforcement in a volunteer capacity. Topics include peer support, basic law, scams and frauds, crime prevention and report writing. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate a fact pattern and apply a specific crime code to the pattern.
  • locate and interpret a department's general orders.
  • describe specific crime prevention techniques.

PSTC 1582 VIPS Academy - Module B

  • Units:1
  • Hours:25 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1581
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed as the second of two courses to assist citizen volunteers to better understand the various aspects of the law enforcement community. Topics include traffic control, explosives, radio procedures, drugs and search and rescue techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast gang dynamics to determine gang affiliation.
  • categorize various drugs and drug paraphernalia to determine type, legality, or illegality.
  • Identify and report an explosive device.

PSTC 1584 Life Skills - Power Program --Sac Sheriff

  • Units:1
  • Hours:26 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to assist those who have a criminal background in developing life skills. Course topics include Domestic Violence, Substance Abuse, Identifying Drug Problems, Anger Management, and Communication Techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss state laws and local rules regarding Domestic Violence.
  • design a personal program regarding abstinence from substance abuse.
  • evaluate effects of drug and alcohol use on children.
  • create a personal plan for anger/stress management.
  • develop interpersonal and communication skills by incorporating active listening techniques.
  • implement a daily health and nutrition plan.

PSTC 1585 Employment Training - Power Program - SSD

  • Units:1
  • Hours:26 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to prepare those who have a criminal background in seeking employment. Course topics include completing employment applications and resumes, navigating the job interview and job seeking skills. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • prepare an employment application.
  • compose an employment resume.
  • respond to interview questions.
  • develop an employment cover and thank-you letter.

PSTC 1586 Citizens Academy - SPD

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 24 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the criminal justice system. Topics include the role of the District Attorney, role of law enforcement and internal affairs, special challenges for the prosecution, race as a factor in the criminal justice system, the federal criminal justice system, anatomy of a criminal case, the judicial system, community focus and gangs, and building bridges and partnerships. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the primary roles and responsibilities of Sacramento area law enforcement agencies and the District Attorney.
  • recognize the importance of effective partnerships among communities and criminal justice agencies.
  • analyze the benefits of achieving long term strategies and solutions to public safety and quality of life issues.

PSTC 1602 Defensive Tactics Instructor

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:80 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students with the requisite skills and knowledge to provide weaponless defense instruction in POST certified law enforcement and/or STC certified correctional environments. Instruction is provided in the areas of defense and liability issues for police and corrections, health and safety precautions for instructing manipulative skills, safe and proper application of control holds, take-down maneuvers and ground fighting. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the instructor's role and associated liability for providing law enforcement/corrections agencies with instruction in weaponless defense.
  • explain law enforcement/correction's use of weaponless defense tactics in the use force continuum.
  • explain the proper and safe training conditions under which to provide instruction in weaponless defense.
  • demonstrate instruction on the safe application of control holds, take-down techniques, and escape techniques.
  • explain the safety hazards of utilizing the carotid restraint and the required after care associated with utilization of the technique.
  • discuss the necessity for the proper documentation of the use of force.
  • develop a POST and/or STC weaponless defense expanded course outline and lesson plan.
  • evaluate a student's safe application of control holds, take-down techniques, and escape techniques.
  • provide corrective instruction for a student's safe application of control holds, take-down techniques, and escape techniques.

PSTC 1603 Defensive Tactics Instructor- Advanced

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:40 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1602
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with advanced skills and knowledge for providing weaponless defense ground fighting instruction in POST certified law enforcement and/or STC certified corrections environments. Topics include legal updates, ground control, take-downs, wall defenses, escapes, and sustained resistance techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • instruct, evaluate, and correct a student in the application of take-down techniques to a ground control.
  • instruct, evaluate, and correct a student in the application of gun take-a ways.
  • develop a POST and/or STC lesson plan for ground fighting.
  • develop a departmental use of force policy.

PSTC 1604 Defensive Tactics Instructor Update

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:24 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1602
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides weaponless defense instructors with updates in techniques, tactics, and legal issues in contemporary policing. Topics include legal updates, control holds, take-downs, arrest tactics, searches, handcuffing, ground control, and expert witness testimony. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss liability issues associated with providing weaponless defense training for law enforcement agencies.
  • discuss relevant changes in statutory and case law pertaining to the use of force.
  • demonstrate and evaluate gun retention techniques.
  • demonstrate and evaluate take down and ground fighting techniques.
  • demonstrate and discuss handcuffing techniques.
  • discuss the challenges unique to testifying as an expert witness in weaponless defense.

PSTC 1621 Impact Weapons Instructor

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:80 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces students to effective instructional design and methods for teaching a Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST) certified course in the use of impact weapons course in public safety environments. Topics include adult learning, aggression and suspect action, POST regulations for instructing, evaluating, and testing in the use of impact weapons and documentation per the POST Administrative Manual (PAM), relevant case law, legal issues, physical warm-ups, striking and blocking techniques with the baton and the yawara stick, personal body weapons, and confrontational exercises and evaluations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe how adults learn.
  • identify the POST regulations that apply to the training, evaluation, testing, and documentation of impact weapons instruction in a law enforcement environment.
  • identify liability issues in the use of impact weapons.
  • demonstrate the safe, effective, and proper use of one or more law enforcement approved impact weapons.
  • demonstrate the use of three different methods to instruct a student on the safe and proper use of a law enforcement approved impact weapon.
  • evaluate and document a student's learning and performance in the use of one or more impact weapons that meets requirements of the PAM.
  • develop and implement a POST expanded course outline and lesson plan.

PSTC 1622 Impact Weapons Instructor - Update

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:16 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1621
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides impact weapons instructors with updated skills and knowledge in the use of force and the accompanying legal issues in the public safety environment. Topics include review of baton use, striking techniques, and legal and liability updates. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate liability issues regarding impact weapons.
  • discuss the different strike zones of the body.
  • demonstrate the use of various impact weapons while instructing.
  • discuss changes in case law pertaining to the use of impact weapons.
  • discuss changes in PAM regulations pertaining to the instruction, evaluation, and testing in the use of impact weapons.

PSTC 1625 Arrest Control and Baton Instructor - SPD

  • Units:3
  • Hours:42 hours LEC; 38 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides law enforcement officers with the skills necessary to be certified as arrest control and baton instructors. Topics include principles of arrest control, legal issues, search fundamentals, handcuffing techniques and application, ground-fighting techniques, and carotid control hold. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • safely apply control holds and take down techniques.
  • explain the hazards and first aid techniques of carotid restraint.
  • compare and contrast various laws and liability issues associated with the use of force.
  • safely apply take downs and ground control.
  • identify liability issues associated with the use of impact weapons.
  • effectively manipulate impact weapons for safe and legal use in the law enforcement environment.
  • identify how adults learn.
  • create a training plan.

PSTC 1640 Firearms Familiarization (PC 832)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:19 hours LEC; 5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This POST certified course complies with California Penal Code 832. It provides a basic introduction to legal aspects of shooting and safety. Topics include handgun familiarization, safety, shooting principles, and live fire exercises. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe a handgun's nomenclature.
  • manipulate a firearm in a safe manner.
  • compare and contrast different shooting principles.

PSTC 1645 Force and Weaponry - Basic

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:24 hours LEC; 16 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1273
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for field probation officers who are required to carry firearms in the performance of their duties. Topics include day and night shooting, use of force, firearms safety, principles of arrest control, and tactical reloading. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • assess the need for the use of force and select the appropriate level of force to be used.
  • demonstrate techniques for the safe handling, loading, and unloading of firearms.
  • employ a lawful and reasonable use of force defense against an armed assailant.
  • demonstrate proficiency in weapon retention.

PSTC 1646 Force and Weaponry - Advanced

  • Units:1
  • Hours:16 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1645
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides an update for armed probation officers. Topics include legal issues, shoot/don't shoot, weapon retention, arrest and control, and weapon malfunctions. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply proper arrest and control procedures while arresting an individual.
  • assess a situation to determine the level of force necessary to be used.
  • employ proper safety techniques when using a firearm.

PSTC 1648 Firearms Tactical Rifle SSD

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:10 hours LEC; 14 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course builds upon the student's existing skills and knowledge in the legal, safe, and proper use of firearms in the law enforcement environment. Instruction includes the safe and proper handling of the long rifle, consideration of environmental factors, tactical shooting, tactical movement, and shooting under dim light conditions. This course is formerly known as SCSD 1221. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate the ability to safely and properly disassemble, assemble, and clean a patrol rifle.
  • demonstrate the ability to safely and properly use a long rifle under a variety of lighting conditions.

PSTC 1650 Firearms Instructor

  • Units:3
  • Hours:48 hours LEC; 32 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1683; POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is specifically designed to prepare experienced law enforcement personnel to teach firearms courses at the basic and in-service level. Topics include the role of the law enforcement firearms instructor, liability issues, instructor development, lesson plan development, basic marksmanship, shooter problem analysis, standard and non-traditional shooting positions, weapons transition, and tactical movement and cover. This course meets the minimum instructor certification requirements to be a POST pistol, rifle, and shotgun instructor. Successful completion of all portions of the course, including all course work and firearms qualifications, are mandatory to receive certification. Partial certification will not be allowed. POST certification 2970-21640. Pass/No Pass.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the four cardinal rules of firearms safety.
  • identify the state and federal laws pertaining to the use of firearms.
  • conduct an agency firearms training needs assessment.
  • identify the roles of the firearms instructor.
  • demonstrate proficiency with industry standard firearms and shooting practices, static and moving line drills.
  • prepare a lesson plan, safety plan, and training diagram for the law enforcement academy recruit firearms qualifications course and the state mandated in-service re-qualification course.
  • assess shooting problems and target analysis.
  • evaluate and properly document student shooting performance and deficiencies.

PSTC 1651 Firearms Instructor Update

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:2 hours LEC; 22 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1650
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to further develop and update existing firearm instructors on instructional techniques, diagnostic interpretation, and target systems. This course is accredited by the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) with POST Certification #297021740 and the Standards and Training for Correction (STC) Program #0218-027422. This course is formerly known as PSTC 1258. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • diagnose sample problem shooter and develop an appropriate training plan.
  • design a target system for various courses of fire.
  • construct a training presentation for an individual to safely manipulate various weapons during hands-on application and under a variety of conditions.
  • assess a law enforcement agency firearms and use of force policies to ensure they are contemporary and in compliance with state and local regulations.

PSTC 1653 Firearms Instructor - Long Rifle

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:30 hours LEC; 10 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1650; POST-certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee that state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for existing law enforcement firearms instructors to develop into effective patrol rifle instructors in the AR15 platform patrol rifle. This will be accomplished through an understanding of the weapon, legal aspects, demonstrating proficiency with the weapon, as well as specific training in the teaching of a patrol rifle course. Topics include safety protocol, liability, nomenclature, weapon employment, and student presentations. Because this course is designed to provide practical hands-on training in police tactics and weapon usage, participants will engage in activities and exercises that include a risk of injury. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss legal aspects and agency policy and procedures for use of the long rifle in day to day law enforcement activities.
  • demonstrate the safe and proper use, cleaning and storage of the long rifle.
  • prepare a safety plan, lesson plan and qualification course for the long rifle.
  • demonstrate classroom, range, and firing line instruction for the use of the long rifle.
  • evaluate and document a student's long-rifle shooting pattern/performance and any recommended corrective measures.

PSTC 1654 Firearms / Rifle Instructor - Update

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:2 hours LEC; 22 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200; Firearms Instructor PSTC 1650 or Firearms Instructor - Long Rifle PSTC 1653
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides the law enforcement firearms instructor with contemporary information on legal issues, liability issues, updated training techniques and skills assessment in the use of the short barreled patrol rifle. Topics include instructional techniques, close-quarter combat and active shooter techniques, maintenance, and deployment shooting techniques. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • employ adult learning techniques while instructing law enforcement officers in the use of firearms.
  • define and analyze the legal aspects related to the use of a rifle and its deployment.
  • evaluate individual officer firearm proficiency and create an improvement program.

PSTC 1660 Public Safety Dispatcher - Basic (SPD)

  • Units:6
  • Hours:105 hours LEC; 15 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to introduce new dispatchers to the basic requirements of first responder dispatching. This course fulfills the requirement by Commission on Standards and Training for Peace Officers (POST). Topics include telephone procedures, radio procedures, stress management, criminal justice system and law. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply communication skills in a crucial situation.
  • evaluate the need for a low enforcement response based upon a specific fact pattern.
  • analyze information provided by a citizen and interpret it to a responding officer.
  • evaluate specific information and apply the appropriate laws to the situation.

PSTC 1661 Public Safety Dispatcher - Advanced (SPD)

  • Units:8
  • Hours:77 hours LEC; 203 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1660
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for public safety dispatchers who have successfully completed the Public Safety Dispatcher Basic Course. Topics include local geography, databases, officer safety, system inquiries, telephone systems and practical exercises. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • deduce the correct geographical location and select the appropriate unit to dispatch.
  • generate a computer aided dispatch inquiry for law enforcement information.
  • compare and contrast specific facts to determine the appropriate incident codes.
  • discuss the employee assistance/peer support program.

PSTC 1662 Radio Dispatch Academy (SPD)

  • Units:2.5
  • Hours:33 hours LEC; 42 - 47 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1660
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course increases the student's knowledge of radio procedures and technology, emergency dispatch, and telecommunications. Topics include radio equipment, radio codes, basic voice dispatch, special assistance commands, broadcast procedures, officer safety, and search patterns. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate a working knowledge of computer aided dispatch equipment.
  • process traffic stops, subject stops, and on-view incidents using a computer aided dispatch system.
  • demonstrate the dispatch of basic calls for police service.
  • demonstrate the dispatch of emergency calls for service.

PSTC 1663 SPD Communications Training Program (CTP)

  • Units:2
  • Hours:34 hours LEC; 6 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200 with a grade of "C" or better; Completion of a POST Law Enforcement Basic or Dispatcher's Academy
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to instruct dispatchers on the techniques for training newly assigned personnel to a communications center. Topics include leadership, training models, adult learning theories and practical exercises. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the differences between the traditional dispatch models and the Communications Training Program (CTP).
  • demonstrate teaching and evaluation methods used in the CTP program.
  • analyze adult learning styles and describe how they impact the learning process.
  • construct a learning matrix binder with relevant departmental operating procedures, regulations and other necessary materials.

PSTC 1671 Automated Field Reporting (AFR)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:4 hours LEC; 16 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1660 (Public Safety Dispatcher - Basic (SPD)) or equivalent as determined by the Dean of academy instruction.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course builds upon students' existing skills, providing training and orientation to the law enforcement records management system. Topics include records management, tracking, data screens and terminology. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast the records management system and automated field reporting system.
  • define the terminology used when using the records management system.

PSTC 1683 Continuing Professional Training for Peace Officers

  • Units:0.25 - 1.5
  • Hours:6 - 16 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course updates and advances the student's existing knowledge and skill set associated with effective policing in dynamic environments. Instruction includes tactical firearms, arrest and control,first aid/CPR refresher, and tactical communication. This course is formerly known as SCSD 1150. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify mandated legislative training requirements for public safety personnel.
  • demonstrate the safe and legal execution of arrest methods and defensive tactics associated with the use of non-lethal force.
  • demonstrate the legislatively mandated and industry standard public safety first aid/CPR techniques.
  • demonstrate the proper storage, handling, cleaning, firing, and tactical movement techniques for the use of public safety agency approved on-duty firearms.
  • demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills that develop rapport, reduce conflict, and optimize safety for public safety personnel and community members.
  • discuss the impact of contemporary and evolving issues on policing in diverse communities.

PSTC 1684 Continued Professional Training - Sacramento Police Department

  • Units:0.25 - 2.5
  • Hours:4 - 40 hours LEC; 4 - 40 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST-certified basic law enforcement academy within two (2) years or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction (Chapter 11, California Code of Regulations, Section 1005). NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course updates and advances the student's existing knowledge and skill set associated peacekeeping and law enforcement in contemporary society. Instruction in evolving issues includes the safe handling of firearms, tactical shooting, tactical movement, arrest and control, ground fighting, chemical weapons, non-lethal weapons, government codes, penal codes, vehicle codes, health and safety codes, welfare and institution codes, and interpersonal and tactical communication. This course is formerly known as SPD 1193. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss how recent changes to case and statutory impact law enforcement policies and procedures, field operations, and police-community relations.
  • demonstrate effective verbal and non-verbal communication skills to optimize community and officer safety.
  • demonstrate the legislatively mandated and industry standard first aid/CPR/AED techniques.
  • demonstrate the proper storage, handling, cleaning and firing techniques for agency approved on-duty firearms.

PSTC 1685 Patrol Entry and Search Training- SPD

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:3 hours LEC; 5 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This update course provides students with information on the various aspects of patrol entry and search techniques. Topics include firearms entry and search techniques in the law enforcement environment, including room clearing, three man bump, and team composition. This course is formerly known as SPD 1217. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the officer safety aspects associated with the entering and searching a business or residence.
  • explain safe handling of firearms in entry and search training situations.
  • demonstrate law enforcement entry techniques.

PSTC 1695 Media for the Public Information Officer or Public Affairs Officer

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the new Public Information Officer, Public Affairs Officer or individual whose responsibility it is to work with the media. Topics include legal issues, issue management, crisis and incident management, media management, interview training and writing for the media. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply laws affecting media relations and public safety.
  • manage strategies and tactics for working with various types of media.
  • evaluate opportunities and challenges in interacting with special interest groups.

PSTC 1713 Special Weapons and Tactics - Commander

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:20 hours LEC; 30 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency. Students who do not hold a POST basic certificate, or equivalent, may struggle in this course, because fundamental terms and concepts and laws basic to law enforcement will not be taught or explained.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for supervisors or command staff assigned responsibility for a SWAT unit. Topics include tactical entries, utilizing assault weapons, barricaded subjects, and conducting tactical rescues. This course was formerly known as SCSD 1232. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply leadership concepts in tactical situations.
  • assess tactical situations and select appropriate responses such as team deployment, evacuation options, weapons selection, and/or use of chemical agents.
  • recognize a critical incident and prepare a tactical response to the situation.

PSTC 1720 Defensive Driving

  • Units:0.25
  • Hours:8 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to enhance the driving skills of public employees who are required to drive motor vehicles in the performance of their duties. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • manipulate a motor vehicle in a safe manner.
  • apply appropriate techniques to control vehicle skids

PSTC 1722 Driver Training - Update

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:6 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:“Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.”
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for law enforcement personnel to update them on new laws and refresh their driving skills. This is a Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) mandate. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast legal immunities and liabilities affecting law enforcement personnel.
  • employ appropriate emergency vehicle driving techniques under a variety of emergency and non-emergency situations.

PSTC 1729 Emergency Vehicle Operations Instructor (SSD/SPD)

  • Units:1
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 28 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200; Completion of a Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) Basic Academy
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides information and resources to start an emergency vehicle operations course, develop instructional lesson plans, and day to day operational issues. Topics include starting an Emergency Vehicle Operations Course program, Emergency Response, Pursuit Driving, and Civil Liability. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize and discuss defensive driving factors.
  • demonstrate Pursuit Immobilization Techniques (PIT).
  • construct a skid pan and pursuit training program.
  • compare and contrast emergency response and pursuit statistics.

PSTC 1734 Basic K9 Training

  • Units:7
  • Hours:8 hours LEC; 372 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide officers with skills and knowledge in all areas of canine (K9) training and deployment. Topics include home care, kenneling, obedience, narcotics, obstacles, control work, area search, bite work, canine behavior, gunfire, building search, tracking, socialization, call-outs, call-offs, multiple agitators, and vehicle deployments. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain canine behavior and learning process.
  • apply appropriate canine training techniques.
  • navigate a variety of obstacles typically encountered by a canine handler.
  • critique and control the canine in a variety of field situations.
  • compare and contrast canine obedience training techniques.
  • conduct field tracking and building searches using a canine partner.

PSTC 1744 Less Lethal Force Update- SPD

  • Units:0.75
  • Hours:12 hours LEC; 6 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This update course on lethal force enhances the knowledge of personal safety and effectiveness of the officer assigned to patrol. Topics include pepper spray, use of baton, and carotid holds. This course is formerly known as SPD 1195. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • interpret use of force policies and applicable statutory and case laws.
  • evaluate the appropriate level of force to use under a variety of circumstances and conditions.
  • choose effective protocol for Taser deployment.

PSTC 1745 Police Radar Operator (SPD)

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:32 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency. Students who do not hold a POST basic certificate, or equivalent, may struggle in this course, because fundamental terms and concepts and laws basic to law enforcement will not be taught or explained.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course advances the student's existing knowledge and skill set in the area of traffic violation enforcement and in the proper use of police radar devices. Topics include speed enforcement, history and theory, vehicle code law and court decisions, moving radar operation, radar effects, and visual speed and range estimation. The course may meet at various off-campus locations. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • operate a police radar device as a stationary unit.
  • demonstrate knowledge of laws affecting the operation of radar devices.
  • evaluate a moving vehicle's speed and estimate the approximate speed.
  • evaluate and interpret information in a clear and concise manner and testify in a court of law regarding the information.

PSTC 1749 Officer Survival and Tactics

  • Units:1
  • Hours:8 hours LEC; 32 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to advance the skill level of law enforcement personnel in the most current methods of field tactics and combative confrontations. Topics include officer survival techniques, handgun retention techniques, and defensive tactics. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast various defensive tactics and apply the appropriate technique for a give situation.
  • apply safe searching techniques when searching a room.
  • analyze a situation to determine if it is necessary to use deadly force.

PSTC 1760 Basic Crime Prevention

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for new law enforcement personnel who provide basic crime prevention services for community members. Topics include physical hardware, alarm applications, use of environmental design, security surveys, community support, and program evaluation. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define the purposes of neighborhood watch.
  • plan a neighborhood watch program for a neighborhood.
  • interpret the role of the police in the crime prevention process.
  • construct a crime prevention survey program for a business.
  • define the crime prevention process as it relates to the criminal justice system.

PSTC 1761 Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for crime prevention personnel and city and county planners dealing with environmental designs. Topics include reviewing new construction submittals and it's impact on law enforcement, community policing, problem solving and theory and process. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the basic applications of Community Policing.
  • compare and contrast CPTED theories.
  • evaluate a specific site and apply CPTED theories.

PSTC 1763 High Rise Policing and Crime Prevention through Environmental Design

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides participants with an awareness of the specific and unique considerations for designing high rise structures relative to preparing for, preventing, and responding to high rise incidents. Topics include infrastructure protection, critical assessment and management, crime prevention, physical security, mass evacuations and terror mitigation. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the impact of weapons of mass destruction, explosive devices, and fires as they relate to high rise structures.
  • Identify and explain at least two critical infrastructure components.
  • Define the basic principles and strategies of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) relative to high rise structures.

PSTC 1768 Community Oriented Policing

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is for new personnel assigned to work within Community Oriented Policing Programs (COPPS) and/or Problem Oriented Policing Program (POPPS). Topics include introduction to COPPS and POPPS, problem solving, facilitating community meetings, politics and Section 8 housing. Pass/No Pass only

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast COPPS and POPPS.
  • identify common community problems/quality of life issues and best practice problem-solving models.
  • facilitate a community meeting in a manner that reduces conflict as a result of politics and personal agendas.
  • analyze information and/or data associated with a community problem and develop an appropriate response.
  • evaluate the effectiveness of problem-solving efforts.

PSTC 1770 Basic Peer Support

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:6 - 10 hours LEC; 18 - 30 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course introduces the skills required to provide basic peer support in the law enforcement environment. Topics include communication and listening skills, peer support methods, critical incidents and critical incident stress management, operational stress injury, the grief cycle, suicide prevention and intervention, peer support responses, and peer support program building. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the mission and goals of a law enforcement peer support program.
  • identify the three components of a critical incident.
  • describe the physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional reactions and perceptual distortions commonly associated with critical incidents.
  • discuss the impact and recognition of secondary trauma.
  • demonstrate active listening skills.
  • discuss the potential impact of critical incident stress on an individual's law enforcement career and family.
  • delineate the principles of stress management.
  • apply the ACE model for suicide prevention and intervention.

PSTC 1771 Faith in Crisis

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides volunteer crisis responders with the basic knowledge needed to provide appropriate support for survivors of violent crimes and critical incidents. Topics include local program background, structure, and code of ethics; operational procedures for local public safety agencies; local resources and referral agencies; occupational health, safety, and first aid; and mandated reporting requirements. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • list the types of events that tend to cause emotional trauma.
  • describe normal physical, mental, emotional, behavioral, and spiritual reactions to a trauma.
  • identify symptoms that indicate a traumatized person needs prompt attention from a medical professional.
  • identify risk factors that may indicate a survivor should be encouraged to seek out a mental health professional.
  • explain how providing effective crisis intervention as soon as possible after a traumatic incident can have a long-term effect on survivors' lives.
  • identify self-care techniques for volunteer crisis responders.

PSTC 1773 Basic Critical Incident Stress Management

  • Units:1
  • Hours:18 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course examines a wide range of crisis intervention services, including pre-incident and post-incident crisis education, significant support services, crisis intervention for individuals, demobilizations after large-scale traumatic incidents, small group diffusing, and the group intervention known as Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD). Pass/No Pass Only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and explain crisis intervention services.
  • demonstrate specific demobilizations and defusings.
  • demonstrate specific interventions.
  • prepare a simulated Critical Incident Stress Debriefing.

PSTC 1778 Interpersonal and Tactical Communications: Train the Trainer

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the individual who is assigned to or intends to teach Interpersonal and Tactical Communications. Topics include elements of communication, persuasion techniques, questioning techniques, adult learning concepts and lesson planning. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate different communication techniques.
  • apply methods of de-escalation using verbal and non-verbal communication.
  • develop an an extended course outline and prepare a lesson plan for Tactical Communication.

PSTC 1780 Campus Law Enforcement

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:Successful completion of a POST certified basic law enforcement academy within the last three years or current equivalent training as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee that state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency. Students who do not hold a POST basic certificate, or equivalent, may struggle in this course, because fundamental terms and concepts and laws basic to law enforcement will not be taught or explained.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course extends the student’s fundamental knowledge of and skill set in contemporary law enforcement and peacekeeping in diverse societies to include the considerations and challenges unique to the campus environment. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of school police, mandatory reporting requirements, constitutional, case, and juvenile law specific to school campuses, situational and tactical awareness in the education setting, clique structure, gang culture, dynamics of student behavior, and application of crowd control, emergency management, and incident command principles on and around campus. This course is certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST), #2970-22294. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the school police officer's role and responsibilities in the education environment.
  • discuss the school police officer's authority on and off duty.
  • recognize student behavior as it relates to providing a safe educational environment, with a focus on gang culture, gang dynamics, and/or clique structure.
  • recount the laws relative to search, seizure, and arrest on school campuses.
  • discuss the school discipline process and privacy issues as they relate to student records.
  • identify mandated reporting requirements and liability issues on and off campus.
  • utilize communication skills to defuse conflict and obtain voluntary compliance.
  • utilize age-appropriate mediation to resolve conflicts.
  • identify dangerous and potentially dangerous situations, trespassers, and the time frame for potential problems to arise on and around the campus.
  • summarize the school district's responsibilities for managing disasters and emergencies.
  • apply crime scene management and crowd control principles on and around campus.

PSTC 1781 School Resource Officer

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the officer assigned or newly assigned as a school resource officer. Topics include school law, mentoring, basic teaching skills, instructional techniques and constructing a course outline. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and apply appropriate codes to individual and/or groups of students.
  • compare and contrast gang affiliation indicia.
  • develop a 2-4 hour course outline.

PSTC 1783 Campus Law Enforcement Supervisor

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:28 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1780
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide skills and knowledge for the campus law enforcement supervisor employed by a school district. Topics include the role and responsibilities of the campus supervisor, administrative processes, campus safety plans, violence mitigation, crowd control, disaster and emergency management, disciplinary and truancy hearings, legal update, and liability issues for campus supervisors. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the role and responsibilities of the campus supervisor.
  • explain legal issues and liabilities related to campus supervision.
  • explain the importance of procedural justice.
  • discuss the impact of technology on student behavior and campus life.
  • develop a campus security plan.
  • develop a campus emergency and disaster response plan.

PSTC 1787 School Security Officer

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for security officers and guards (watch-person, campus monitor, campus officer) employed by a school district (K-12 or California Community College) for more than 20 hours per week. Topics include roles and responsibilities, liability issues, conflict resolution and student behavior. This course is approved by Department of Consumer Affairs/Bureau of Security and Investigative Services, and the California Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST). Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify important points of campus law enforcement.
  • identify appropriate laws and regulations related to search and seizure on school grounds.
  • demonstrate knowledge of handling disasters and emergencies within the on-campus environment.

PSTC 1800 Interview and Interrogation Techniques

  • Units:2
  • Hours:36 hours LEC; 4 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course advances the law enforcement or corrections student's knowledge and skills set in legal and behavioral techniques associated with interview and interrogation. Topics include predictable behavior, free-format interviews, elimination interviews, polygraphs, and the Ten Step Plan for interviews and interrogations. This course is certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST), #2970-31445 and Standards and Training for Corrections (STC), #0218-007921. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • compare and contrast attorney privileges specified in 5th and 6th Amendments.
  • determine when to apply the Miranda Warning three-pronged test.
  • conduct free format, cognitive, and elimination interviews.

PSTC 1801 Background Investigations

  • Units:1.5 - 2
  • Hours:32 - 40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for law enforcement or civilian personnel who are responsible for conducting background investigations for the hiring of public safety personnel. Topics include the background process, psychological evaluations, interviewing techniques and documentation. This course is approved by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) and California Standards and Training for Corrections (STC). Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the instruments available to detect deception.
  • apply the Commission on Peace Officers Standards and Training (POST) rules and regulations to the public safety background process.
  • evaluate pre-employment applications for employment recommendation.

PSTC 1804 Informant Development and Maintenance

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course advances students' existing investigative skills, interview and interrogation skills, informant development and management, case management and the development and execution of search warrants. Topics include common problems when using informants, limitations on the use of informants, informant motives, informant policies, investigative strategies, and informants and ethics.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the most common problems encountered when using informants.
  • identify and discuss the contemporary state and federal statutes related to developing confidential informants.
  • discuss law enforcement agency policies relevant to informant development, vicarious liability and officer safety.
  • describe the parameters for maintaining the confidentiality of informants.
  • demonstrate interview techniques for recruiting and developing informants.
  • demonstrate confidential informant case development, utilization and management in undercover scenarios.
  • discuss the ethical issues associated with the use of informants.

PSTC 1806 Crime Analysis

  • Units:1.5
  • Hours:32 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for the newly hired, promoted, or assigned crime analyst and/or supervisor responsible for law enforcement crime analysis functions with an agency. Topics include building a crime analysis unit, staffing, data collection and information dissemination. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • discuss the elements of crime analysis.
  • collect and analyze information to construct crime patterns.
  • evaluate and determine the appropriate distribution of crime analysis data.

PSTC 1807 Advanced Identification of Organized Criminal Street Gangs and Criminal Gang Activities

  • Units:0.25 - 0.75
  • Hours:8 - 16 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides students with information and resource identification critical to the reduction of gang violence. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and document local organized criminal street gangs.
  • identify the impact of criminal street gangs on communities.
  • identify law enforcement and community partners impacted by organized criminal street gangs.

PSTC 1808 Advanced Organized Gang Investigations

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200, 1519, 1878, or 1879 with a grade of "C" or better
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course enhances the skill level of law enforcement officers, probation and parole officers with information vital to reduce gang violence. Topics include identification and documentation of organized gang activity, proactive investigative techniques, developing an investigative plan, case initiation and operational planning, case organization and documentation, and multi-location and multi-jurisdictional search warrants.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify and document local organized criminal street gangs.
  • identify law enforcement, corrections and community partners impacted by organized criminal street gangs and gang violence.
  • develop a strategy for providing gang education, gang prevention, and gang violence reduction.

PSTC 1812 Fingerprint Identification - Basic

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to provide basic instruction in fingerprint comparison and identification. Topics include ridge characteristics, basic pattern types, classifications and verifications. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate basic fingerprint pattern types.
  • classify a fingerprint based upon established procedures.
  • compare and contrast a fingerprint to identify an individual.

PSTC 1813 Crime Scene and Forensic Photography of Physical Evidence

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides law enforcement crime scene investigators the skills needed to conduct forensic photography of physical evidence as well as conduct general crime scene photography. Topics include legal admissibility, photographic coverage, major crime scene photography, film speed, lighting techniques, and photographic equipment. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the importance of documenting every photograph taken at a crime scene.
  • demonstrate how to properly photograph a crime scene.
  • recommend film suitable for crime scene and evidence photography.
  • select proper camera settings to properly expose color and black and white film.

PSTC 1814 Advanced Latent Print Comparison & Identification

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1812
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This advanced course is designed for the crime scene investigator or fingerprint technician to learn how to compare and identify latent/fragmentary prints to inked fingerprint and palm print impressions. This course is formerly known as PSTC 1821. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the basis for the science of identification of friction ridge impressions and its historical background.
  • discuss the embryonic development and characteristics of friction ridge skin.
  • identify the various friction ridge formations and ridge flows found on the fingers, thumbs, and palmer surface of the hand.
  • analyze and use the ridge flows and creases on the palmer surface of the hand to help locate and orient fragmentary friction ridge impressions for comparison to known impressions.
  • identify the three phalanges of the fingers and the two phalanges of the thumbs and the phalangeal creases are commonly discovered.
  • describe the various shapes of latent palm prints that will provide orientation clues for a comparison to a corresponding area in a known impression.
  • discuss verification protocols, note taking, and documentation matters.
  • develop proficiency with the ACE-V Scientific Method to compare and identify partial/fragmentary latent friction ridge impressions.
  • understand the usefulness of charts to illustrate and identification by friction ridges to a jury.
  • discuss what juries expect to see and hear from a latent fingerprint expert.
  • develop a list of “qualification questions” and answers to use when testifying as an expert fingerprint witness in the future.
  • take the I.A.I. Latent Print Examiner Certification test.
  • take legible Complete Friction Ridge Exemplars.

PSTC 1820 Crime Scene Investigation - Basic

  • Units:2
  • Hours:30 hours LEC; 30 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed for newly assigned law enforcement agency crime scene investigators who are responsible for conducting crime scene investigations. Topics include evidence integrity, documentation, evidence recognition and preservation, firearms study, latent prints, and evidence handling and storage. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • evaluate and preserve critical evidence.
  • analyze and prepare documentation of a crime scene through photography and videography.
  • apply court recognized procedures for handling and storage of evidence.
  • compare and contrast bloodstain spatter.

PSTC 1852 Drug and Alcohol Recognition

  • Units:1
  • Hours:24 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides law enforcement personnel with the knowledge and skills to evaluate the effects of drugs and alcohol on an individual and to provide expert testimony on the evaluation. Topics include legal codes, stimulants and depressants, investigative techniques and courtroom testimony. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recognize and categorize the effects of different drugs on the human body.
  • recognize objective symptoms of alcohol on the human body.
  • compare and contrast the effects of alcohol between individuals at various levels of intoxication.
  • administer legally approved field tests to determine the level of intoxication.

PSTC 1853 Integrated Narcotics Training

  • Units:0.5 - 1
  • Hours:4 - 8 hours LEC; 32 - 36 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course advances the student's existing advanced investigative skills with specialized narcotics related training. Topics include ethics and integrity, surveillance techniques, undercover operations, and asset seizure. This course is formerly known as SPD 1237. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • recall updated case law, forfeiture procedures, and legal requirements for search warrants related to narcotic enforcement.
  • differentiate between reliable and problematic informants.
  • design and formulate a basic search warrant and affidavit.
  • demonstrate basic fixed and moving surveillance techniques.

PSTC 1854 Drug Recognition Evaluator Course

  • Units:3.5
  • Hours:64 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course enhances the skills of law enforcement personnel to evaluate and provide expert testimony on the effects of drugs and alcohol. Topics include psycho-physical tests, eye examinations, alcohol workshop, signs and symptoms, drugs in society, vehicle operation, drug classification process and procedures, nystagmus, convergence, pupil size and reaction to light, physiology and drugs, depressants, stimulants, physician's desk reference, hallucinogens, associative anesthetics, narcotic analgesics, inhalants, cannabis, report writing, curriculum vitae, and case preparation and testimony. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze objective symptoms of alcohol and drugs on the human body.
  • administer legally approved field tests to determine the level of intoxication.
  • recognize and categorize the effects of different drugs on the human body.
  • collect evidence, complete a narrative report, and prepare a case for court.

PSTC 1870 Disaster Preparedness

  • Units:1.25
  • Hours:19 hours LEC; 12 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course prepares students to respond to disasters and take the necessary steps to minimize loss of life and property. Topics include floods, hazardous materials, transportation disasters, wildfires, earthquakes, national security, and critical incidents. This course is formerly known as SCSD 1209. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the characteristics of the seven common disasters.
  • identify and evaluate the basic hazards and problems law enforcement officers face when responding to and managing a disaster/ critical incident.
  • analyze law enforcement disaster plans.

PSTC 1874 Traffic Collision Investigation - Intermediate

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1900
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course is designed to expand the investigative knowledge and skills of the traffic collision investigator. Topics include definitions and terminologies associated with minor and major collisions, measuring and diagramming the collision scene and speed computation. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • diagram a collision for evidential purposes and courtroom presentation.
  • apply mathematical formulas from vehicle tire marks to determine speed.
  • prepare documents for courtroom testimony.

PSTC 1900 Traffic Collision - Basic

  • Units:2
  • Hours:40 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:PSTC 1200
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course provides in-depth instruction into the multiple disciplines of traffic collision investigation. Topics include scene management techniques and introduction to the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, highway engineering definitions, Nine-Cell Matrix, incident scene photography, primary collision factors, identification and documentation of physical evidence, measuring and diagramming methodology, use of the Northwestern University traffic template functions and nomographs, and an in-depth discussion on proper traffic collision documentation and Highway Patrol Manual 110.5, Collision Investigation Manual (CIM). This course satisfies the prerequisites for the Intermediate Collision Investigation course, as well as the requirements of Vehicle Code Section 40600.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the primary collision factor of a traffic collision and justify the opinion based upon the collected facts and statements.
  • identify, collect, and document physical evidence associated with traffic collisions.
  • properly document a complex traffic collision, utilizing the Collision Investigation Manual (HPM 100.5), based on a felony DUI scenario.

PSTC 1902 Traffic Accident Reconstruction

  • Units:4
  • Hours:72 hours LEC; 8 hours LAB
  • Prerequisite:POST certified basic law enforcement academy or equivalent as determined by the Dean of Academy Instruction. NOTE: Approval of equivalent training is not a guarantee state regulatory or licensing agencies will also grant equivalency. Students who do not hold a POST basic certificate, or equivalent, may struggle in this course, because fundamental terms and concepts and laws basic to law enforcement will not be taught or explained.
  • Enrollment Limitation:Students must 1) Be free of felony convictions; 2) possess a valid California Driver's License; 3) undergo a fingerprint and criminal history check; 4) be a minimum of 18 years of age; 5) be a United States high school graduate; pass the GED, pass the California High School Proficiency Examination, or have attained a two-year or four-year degree from an accredited college or university; and 6) complete a medical suitability examination.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course advances the skill set of law enforcement personnel assigned to investigate traffic collisions. It covers the knowledge and skills needed to determine at-impact speeds of collision-involved vehicles and to draw conclusions of how and why the collision occurred. Topics include math and physics review, reconstruction principles, crush analysis, conservation of momentum analysis, heavy duty and articulated vehicles, motorcycle collision, vehicle vs. pedestrian, and bicycle collision analysis. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • apply basic math and physics principles involved in collision reconstruction.
  • calculate slide to stop velocity and conduct critical speed scuff mark analysis.
  • define the basic principles underlying the determination of speed change from collision damage.
  • summarize the collision reconstruction process.
  • formulate and support conclusions as to how and why a traffic accident occurred.

PSTC 1904 LIDAR Operator Course

  • Units:0.5
  • Hours:9 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

This course covers the legal and technical use of light distance and ranging speed enforcement (LIDAR). It includes the history of LIDAR, applicable case law, and visual speed determination skills. May be taken two times for credit. Pass/No Pass only.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • explain the operational considerations when using LIDAR speed enforcement.
  • cite the applicable case law regarding laser speed enforcement.

PSTC 1998 Work Experience in PSTC

  • Units:1 - 4
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Catalog Date:June 1, 2019

Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District (SMFD)