Humanities

Humanities (HUM)

HUM 300 Classical Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or 312, AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 or ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course is a survey of Western culture that focuses on the human values expressed through painting, sculpture, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy. Emphasis is on the civilizations of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the role of the arts in society.
  • analyze major works of visual arts, music, and literature from each of the periods presented.
  • evaluate and logically discuss in written and oral form key philosophical concepts developed in western culture from ancient times through the Middle Ages.
  • compare thematic similarities across a broad range of artistic media, including oral and written literature, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture.

HUM 301 Introduction to the Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102, ENGWR 103, or ESLW 320
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This is a non-chronological course that introduces the humanities, primarily architecture, music, painting, poetry, sculpture, theatre, and film. Emphasis is on identifying, appreciating, analyzing, interpreting, and understanding various masterworks, primarily from Europe and America. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the key components of various genres of art (painting, sculpture, architecture, music, drama etc.)
  • analyze a work of art, including its components, structure, message, meaning, and function
  • compare and contrast two or more works of art of the same genre
  • examine two or more works of art from different genres in order to understand their commonalities and differences of historical context, form, message, and meaning
  • identify historically significant works of art (i.e. "great works" of Michelangelo, Beethoven, Frank Lloyd Wright, and others)

HUM 302 Global Humanities: Atheism in Creativity, Thought, and Inspiration Traditions

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This academic and non-sectarian course emphasizes the historical and cultural frameworks of atheism. It takes a basic, integrated humanities approach to global non-religious traditions. This course analyzes a broad range of visual and performance arts, as well as literary documents, that explore diverse atheist philosophies over time and around the world. It reviews the difference between atheism and related conceptual traditions in creative expression. This course studies works and ideas comparatively, analyzing their relation to their contexts and to their impacts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • demonstrate cultural literacy by interpreting the place and significance of humanities materials within a particular cultural context.
  • contrast different approaches (personal, historical, contextual, formal, thematic) to evaluating a work (e.g. musical selection, poem, essay, painting, building, garden, constructed landscape, website).
  • identify significant arts, artists, ideas, and religious and cultural perceptions of atheism as they have evolved over the course of the human cultural record globally.
  • compare similarities and differences between atheism and ideas conflated inaccurately with atheism across different artistic media, including oral and written literature, music, theater, visual arts, and architecture.

HUM 310 Modern Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course is a survey of Western culture that focuses on the human values expressed through painting, sculpture, architecture, music, literature, and philosophy. Emphasis is on the period from the Renaissance to the Modern Age. Field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • describe the role of the arts in society.
  • analyze major works of visual arts, music, and literature from each of the periods presented.
  • evaluate and logically discuss in written form key philosophical concepts developed in Western Culture from the Renaissance to the Modern Age.
  • compare thematic similarities across a broad range of artistic media, including oral and written literature, music, theatre, visual arts, and architecture.
  • identify significant arts, artists, ideas, and religious and cultural concepts as they have evolved in European and American cultures since the sixteenth century.
  • identify connections between earlier and later arts and ideas as they have developed in response to cultural and political changes in Europe and America.

HUM 320 Asian Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 and ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course surveys traditions, cultures, literatures, art, music, and film of India, China, and Japan from ancient times to the present. Emphasis is on the inter-relationships of the arts, literatures, and philosophies in their historical contexts within each geographical area. Topics may include arts and cultures of other Asian countries such as Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Korea.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify significant arts, ideas, and personalities past and present from Indian, Chinese, and Japanese cultures
  • compare and contrast major similarities and differences between Indian, Chinese, and Japanese cultural values
  • analyze the core ideas and values in the religions and of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shintoism

HUM 324 Global Islam: Culture and Civilization

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2

This course is a comprehensive introduction to Islamic cultures in a variety of geographic settings from the 7th century to the present, with emphasis on religious/philosophic concepts, and their expression in literature and the arts. It focuses on Arab, Persian, African, Asian, and American contributions. Topics include the origins and development of the religion in its formative period (the prophetic career of the Prophet Muhammad, the Qur’an, Islamic belief and ritual, Islamic law, early artistic expressions, and popular spirituality) as well as debates surrounding Islam in the contemporary world.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify the various social, political, and religious structures in place at the birth of Muhammad in the Pre-Islamic Middle East.
  • identify and comprehend how Prophet Muhammad’s responses to the personal, social, political, and religious challenges of his time differed from pre-Islamic responses and became distinctly Islamic.
  • comprehend the significance of the life and death of the Prophet Muhammad as it informs the life of Muslims both past and present in a variety of geographic locations.
  • identify the origin, development, collection, and transmission of the Qur’an in Islam.
  • identify and comprehend the role of the Qur’an as it informs the arts, architecture, literature, music, cultural, and personal lives of Muslims.
  • identify and differentiate between the multiple and distinct Islamic voices arising as a result of Prophet Muhammad’s death and the subsequent struggle for succession and the construction of Islamic authority in the Muslim world including the including Sunni, Shi’a, Sufi, and Wahhabi paths.
  • identify, examine, and explain the multiple and distinct Islamic methods and means by which the Qur’an is interpreted in both historical and contemporary contexts.
  • assess and deconstruct popular misconceptions and mischaracterizations of Islam.
  • identify, contextualize, and discern multiple and distinct Islamic responses to contemporary social issues including gender discourses, politics, power, peace, violence, global religious pluralism, and love.
  • identify, examine, and explain the impacts of European colonialism on the Muslim world.
  • identify, examine, and recognize the contributions of artists, poets, musicians, and writers from differing genders and cultures within the Islamic tradition.
  • develop the critical thinking skills necessary for formulating an analytical framework relevant to the study of global cultures, contemporary American religious pluralism, and the history of Islam.

HUM 326 Middle Eastern Humanities

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 and ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course surveys the cultures of the Middle East, with an emphasis on the analysis and appreciation of the arts, architecture, music, and sacred and secular texts of Egypt, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and other countries from ancient to modern times, as they apply to cultural and political developments.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • examine the roots of Middle Eastern societies as found in ancient texts and arts from Mesopotamia, Arabia, Israel, and Egypt
  • compare and contrast the basic principles, texts, and social developments of major religions of the Middle East, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
  • identify significant artforms of Persian, Ottoman, Jewish, and Arabic cultures
  • analyze concepts and conflicts of the major culture groups in the region, such as the Sunni Muslims, Shi'ite Muslims, Wahhabis, Persians, Jews, and Palestinians
  • analyze the current events in the Middle East as they relate to this region's cultural values and historic roots

HUM 330 Humanities of the Americas

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102 or ENGWR 103 and ENGRD 116 with a grade of "C" or better OR ESLR 320 and ESLW 320.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course examines the fine arts of the Western Hemisphere from antiquity to contemporary times, with an emphasis on an awareness of and a sensitivity to the literature, philosophy, art, and music of the past and present. It compares the various cultures indigenous to the Western Hemisphere both among themselves and in contrast to the cultures of Europe on their arrival in the 15th century. The course explores the ethnic and cultural conflicts and resolutions that constitute the confluence of ideas and beliefs in the Americas. It provides specific attention to the distinctively American aspects of the arts and their difference from the European tradition.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze major works of literature, music, and the visual arts from each of the periods, regions, and cultures presented
  • compare thematic similarities across a broad range of artistic media, including oral and written literature, music, theater, visual arts, and architecture
  • compare the arts and ideas of earlier and later cultures as they have developed in response to changing ethnic, racial, historical, and social forces in the Americas
  • analyze the uniquely American characteristics of the arts of the various cultural traditions of the Western Hemisphere
  • identify significant arts, artists, ideas, and cultural concepts as they have evolved in American culture
  • appraise the role of the arts in American society

HUM 355 Introduction to World Religions

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 OR ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; AA/AS Area VI; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This course surveys selected major world religions. Emphasis is on the origins, development, beliefs, practices, social ethics, and ethnic / cultural issues of indigenous tribal religions, Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course focuses on the central beliefs and practices of these religions using selected material from each religion's sacred texts and arts.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • define basic terms and concepts of the religions studied.
  • explain the effects of key religious beliefs, practices, and cultural conflicts on the families and societies of regions studied.
  • describe the historical developments of the religions studied.
  • compare and contrast key beliefs and worldviews of the religions studied.
  • evaluate the contributions of and tensions between several culturally diverse religious traditions in selected regions of the world.
  • identify the influences of earlier religious traditions on later developing religions.

HUM 360 Introduction to the Old Testament (The Hebrew Bible)

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This academic and non-sectarian course provides a literary, theological, and historical approach to the Hebrew Bible (also called the Old Testament). Ancient Israelite society and beliefs prior to the Common Era are explored primarily through a study of this biblical text, supported by the study of Middle Eastern cultural artifacts, non-biblical texts, and scholarly theories and archaeological studies related to the Hebrew Bible.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • identify key Bible figures and their roles.
  • describe the evolving beliefs and assumptions about the land and people of Israel, their God, and neighboring cultures.
  • examine major academic theories about the Hebrew Bible's structure, message, and audience.
  • evaluate central themes developed by Hebrew Bible writers.
  • compare differing points of view of several major Hebrew Bible book authors.
  • summarize key attributes of God and the Israelites (Hebrews) as found in the Hebrew Bible.

HUM 365 Introduction to the New Testament

  • Units:3
  • Hours:54 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:Eligible for ENGRD 310 or ENGRD 312 AND ENGWR 300; OR ESLR 340 AND ESLW 340.
  • Transferable:CSU; UC
  • General Education:AA/AS Area I; CSU Area C2; IGETC Area 3B

This academic and non-sectarian course provides a literary, theological, and historical approach to the New Testament. These canonical texts of the early Christian community are analyzed in relation to both Judaism and the Greco-Roman world. Topics include contemporaneous religious ideas about the Messiah, the afterlife, the origin of the gospels, the nature of inspiration, transmission of documents and ideas, important Jewish groups, the politics of Palestine under the Romans, and the role of Paul.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze dating and authorship of New Testament (NT) documents using internal and external sources.
  • analyze theories of origins such as the "Q" source and transmission of NT texts.
  • identify Christian theological ideas as connected to and different from Judaism and other Greco-Roman religious influences.
  • define and analyze ideas, symbols, and images in apocalyptic texts.
  • compare and contrast the four gospels in terms of the authors' goals, themes, audiences, and kerygma (proclamations about Jesus).
  • describe the early Christian community's experience and challenges as found in the gospels and Paul's epistles.
  • identify the NT sources of ideas and images that have influenced subsequent Christian worship practices, arts, and music.

HUM 494 Topics in Humanities

  • Units:0.5 - 4
  • Hours:9 - 72 hours LEC
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Advisory:ENGWR 102, ENGWR 103, or ESLW 320, or placement through the assessment process.
  • Transferable:CSU

This course provides the opportunity for concentrated study on specialized topics in the Humanities. Each offering focuses on the integration of arts and ideas in the works of a particular time and place and/or illuminates a selected theme. Refer to class schedule for current topic. Individual field trips may be required.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  • analyze the inter-relationship between specific works of art and the ideas that they express.
  • analyze the role that a particular temporal and/ or geographic context or selected artistic or philosophical theme has/ had in forming and given body of visual and performance arts.
  • compare and contrast key works from the time, place, or theme covered in the course.
  • evaluate the contributation of the arts and ideas of the course selected time, place, or theme, to contemporary global culture.
  • interpret the constraints and enhancements that the time, place or theme imposes/d on the human achievements studied.

HUM 495 Independent Studies in Humanities

  • Units:1 - 3
  • Prerequisite:None.
  • Transferable:CSU